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Carrots

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FOOD
November 29, 1989 | By Marilynn Marter, Inquirer Food Writer
With carrots available at a low of 20 cents a pound this week, savvy shoppers can plan on some low-cost as well as healthful snacking between holiday events. For party menus, carrots offer a welcome change from the calories of the season. Fresh vegetable crudites are a favorite hors d'oeuvre for people concerned with diet and health. And carrot sticks, so rich with the beta carotenes that health professionals are encouraging us to eat to ward off cancer, are a must on any crudites tray.
FOOD
January 20, 1993 | by Barbara Gibbons, Special to the Daily News
Carrots are the ultimate good-for-you "rabbit food. " If you ask your "Doc:" "What's up?" he might tell you about the exciting research linking carrots' main nutrient with health. Maybe it's beta carotene that helps that pink battery bunny keep right on going! Beta carotene - the pigment that makes carrots orange - is an anti-oxidant that helps protect body tissues against cancer. Carotenes are changed by the body into vitamin A, but only about half the carotene you eat actually gets changed.
FOOD
November 28, 2013 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, Inquirer Food Editor
The good news: Bianca Perez announced that she made the chicken and spinach quesadillas she learned in class for her family last week! The bad news: A plastic bag left in our school kitchen with half a bag of chips, half a bag of pretzels, and a package of snowball cupcakes was described as a "breakfast/lunch combo," as in, half eaten for breakfast, the rest for lunch, as a veteran teacher told me. And right there, in those two moments, was...
FOOD
May 7, 1997 | By Faye Levy, FOR THE INQUIRER
Ever since many of us can remember, a common accompaniment for the meat at dinner has been peas and carrots. All too often this side dish was not particularly exciting. Usually it consisted of mushy carrot cubes and grayish-green peas. In the process of canning, their colors were muted and their texture became soft and tired. Frozen peas and carrots did not produce excellent results, either. However, peas and carrots can be a lively combination. My favorite formula is to combine fresh carrots with sugar snap peas.
FOOD
February 22, 1987 | By Leslie Land, Special to The Inquirer
The thing about carrots is that they're so, well, so there, so commonplace, so taken for granted. Say the word and the mind dutifully registers "good for you" or "see at night. " What does the mind picture? Carrot sticks, the dieter's friend, faithful standby of the relish tray; glazed carrots, vitamin-rich staple of childhood; frozen carrots, diced, with fat, flat-tasting green peas. There has been a bit of an improvement lately. Those under the age of 30 seem to associate carrots primarily with cake, which may not be healthful but at least is not dispiriting.
NEWS
April 19, 2012
2 pounds young or baby bunch carrots (peeled baby carrots can be used if necessary) 4 tablespoons olive oil 2 teaspoons sherry vinegar 2 tablespoons Montreal Steak Seasoning 1/2 teaspoon ground clove 2 teaspoons salt 2 teaspoons black pepper 2 teaspoons crushed fresh garlic 12-ounce can of garbanzo beans, drained 6 ounces canned or jarred sauerkraut, with some of its juice 2 tablespoons chopped...
FOOD
July 23, 1997 | by Aliza Green, For the Daily News
Yo, Chefs! At Io e Tu Ristorante in South Philadelphia, every diner is treated to complimentary marinated carrots while waiting for their dinner. Could you obtain the recipe for the dressing? It's very tasty! Also, what's the best technique for grilling fish on a gas grill without drying it out? - Pat Liardo Philadelphia Dear Pat, You're not the only one who enjoys that appetizer. The dish is so popular that Io e Tu (which means "me and you" in Italian and is named for its co-owners Concetta and John Varallo)
FOOD
August 31, 1986 | By Leslie Land, Special to The Inquirer
OK, OK, I know it was only an ad, and not even (except distantly) about politics. But there's something about a sophisticated, full-page, full-color sales pitch that claims frozen broccoli and frozen carrots are the height of culinary elegance - in August! - that rankles. Almost all photograph, the ad featured a "tasteful" place setting worthy of a glossy food magazine, complete with black marble table, black plate and a notable lack of clutter. "You passed up the red flowers. And walked an extra two blocks to find the pinks," rhapsodized the text.
FOOD
April 29, 1990 | By Leslie Land, Special to The Inquirer
For most modern vegetable-lovers, the first great delicacy from the spring garden is probably asparagus, but in the old days that title would have gone to spring-dug parsnips. In my book, it still does. "Spring dugs" are roots that matured in fall and have been left in the ground to overwinter. This increases their sweetness and seems to mellow their flavor. The common wisdom is that parsnips, like Brussels sprouts, must freeze before they are any good. But scientific experiments have proved that what they must do is simply stay very cold - as close to freezing as possible but definitely less than 40 degrees - for several weeks, during which time their formidable starch content slowly converts into sugar.
NEWS
February 27, 2007 | By Kathy Boccella INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Maybe now she won't hurl vegetables at the help anymore. The Villanova heiress accused of roughing up her housekeeper with a bag of carrots, among other things, was sentenced to one-year probation plus $2,800 in fines, mandatory anger-management classes and community service yesterday on charges of criminal mischief and harassment. At Montgomery County court, a smiling, deeply tanned Susan Tabas Tepper, 44, never made eye contact with Xiomara Salinas, the Venezuelan native who accused her of behaving very badly last spring at Tepper's Eagle Farm estate.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 2015 | By Sally McCabe, For The Inquirer
Plant some fall vegetables. Last week, we talked about cooling the soil. Now, it's time to do some last-minute summer planting. Select seeds for short-season, cold-tolerant plants, like beets or carrots that need less than 60 days to mature. They will need even more time, sometimes as much as two weeks more, to get to eating size as the days get shorter and cooler. (I promise you they will - both the carrots and the days.) Once the seeds sprout, provide a little protection by using row cover or shade cloth.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 8, 2015 | By Jenny DeHuff, Daily News
ComicĀ  HeadKrack from "Dish Nation" was in town yesterday to tout a new, hotter Philly time slot for the popular Fox tabloid talk show. "Dish Nation" is moving from midnight to 7 p.m. because it's been doing so well in the ratings. HeadKrack, also a regular DJ on the nationally syndicated radio program "The Rickey Smiley Morning Show" appeared on "Good Day Philadelphia" yesterday with Fox 29 anchors Mike Jerrick and Alex Holley . He thanked Philly for giving him and the show that coveted new spot on Channel 29. "It was originally a dirty little secret - airing in the middle of the night - just getting buried after 11 p.m., but people are starting to recognize," HeadKrack told me yesterday.
NEWS
June 26, 2015 | BY SUSAN SELASKY, Tribune News Service
IF YOU'RE growing your own or getting produce through a CSA, you've probably got the whole vegetable to consider. Using it all can yield more value and variation. Not only are stalks, stems and leaves tasty, but some have entirely different flavors than their more popular parts. Broccoli stalks are sweeter than their florets. Feathery carrot tops taste like herbs and can be used as such. Beet greens mellow when sauteed; raw, they can add a peppery flavor to salads. To gather the makings of a great vegetable stock, keep a plastic bag in the freezer to add vegetable scraps or unused pieces (broccoli stalks, onion pieces, carrots, celery ribs and leaves)
FOOD
March 27, 2015 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, Inquirer Food Editor
As our second cooking class got underway at Roberto Clemente Middle School, I was amazed at how quickly these eighth graders had gotten the hang of things. They filed in, stashed their backpacks, donned their aprons, washed hands, and turned to the recipe. "We're making the winter minestrone today," announced Tatiana Castillo, 13, completely in charge. A new student joined us, our only boy, Raul Camacho, 14, who sports a thick shock of dyed-blue hair and hip black glasses. I wasn't sure what to expect, but he was quiet and serious, and actually a calming addition to our group.
NEWS
February 18, 2015 | ABBY CRUZ, Daily News Staff Writer cruza@phillynews.com, 215-854-5938
VERNON WILKINS travels the city on buses, subways and foot, selling $1 carrot cupcakes he bakes from scratch, using a recipe he has made nearly every day - the exact same way - for the past 35 years. "I never ever, ever, ever changed or skimped on my recipe," he said. "I buy fresh products every day. I go to the market every day. One of my favorite sayings in life is, 'If it's not broke, don't fix it,' and that's how I managed to be successful so long. " In the beginning, Wilkins, 60, sold carrot cake in his West Philly store.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 7, 2014
YOU DON'T have to hunt wild mushrooms to enjoy earthy dishes. In Happy Herbivore: Holidays & Gatherings (BenBella Books) Lindsay Nixon has portobellos stand in for beef in a warming dish she pairs with polenta (recipe below) or mashed potatoes. PORTOBELLO POT ROAST 2 cups vegetable broth, divided 1 small onion, sliced thin 3 to 4 garlic cloves, minced 2 to 3 carrots, sliced 1 parsnip, sliced (optional) 4 portobello mushrooms, de-stemmed, cut into strips 1 cup water 2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar 6 to 8 sprigs fresh thyme 1 sprig fresh rosemary Vegan Worcestershire sauce (optional)
FOOD
April 18, 2014 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, Inquirer Food Editor
It's not enough to get kids to just fork down their vegetables. I want them to embrace carrots and onions and peas, to get excited about green beans and sweet potatoes and beets. So my plan for the fourth cooking class at Henry Lawton Elementary School was to take familiar vegetables and prepare them in an unfamiliar way. I chose a soup made with onion, carrots, and sweet potatoes to demonstrate how different vegetables can feel in your mouth when made a certain way, in this case, all blended together; and how different they can taste when seasoned with spices, in this case curry and paprika.
FOOD
November 28, 2013 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, Inquirer Food Editor
The good news: Bianca Perez announced that she made the chicken and spinach quesadillas she learned in class for her family last week! The bad news: A plastic bag left in our school kitchen with half a bag of chips, half a bag of pretzels, and a package of snowball cupcakes was described as a "breakfast/lunch combo," as in, half eaten for breakfast, the rest for lunch, as a veteran teacher told me. And right there, in those two moments, was...
FOOD
November 8, 2013 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, Inquirer Food Editor
"What is that ?" Bianca Perez exclaimed as I pulled a cream-colored, bottlenecked gourd from the grocery bag. "Butternut squash," I said. "Does it taste like peanut butter?" asked Mark Ramirez. "Not really, but it does look like a peanut," I said. Moroccan stew with butternut squash, carrots, and quinoa was the project for our fourth cooking class at Bayard Taylor school in North Philadelphia. None of my five aspiring fifth-grade cooks had ever tasted butternut squash or quinoa.
NEWS
August 21, 2013 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Like most big employers across the country, Pennsylvania State University has spent several million dollars over the last decade on voluntary wellness programs, hoping to cut health costs and improve workers' health. The strategy hasn't worked. "Only a very small percentage of faculty and staff have participated," university president Rodney Erickson wrote this month to all 17,500 employees and their 22,700 dependents. So Penn State, like a small but fast-growing number of employers, is switching from carrots to sticks.
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