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NEWS
June 7, 2010
I WAS FORTUNATE enough to be able to purchase a nice home at 57th and Race. But ever since, I've pleaded with the congregants at Mount Carmel Baptist Church to not park on the side of my home. They double-park all up and down Race and use every available space in the neighborhood, and when there are no more spaces, they park on the Cecil Street side of my house. On a recent Sunday, there were two identical SUVs parked along the side of my house. I asked one driver if he'd kindly move, and if he knew who the owner of the other SUV was. He told me they were part of the mayor's detail, so he was apparently attending services, and his cars parked on my pavement!
NEWS
December 22, 1987 | By Rushworth M. Kidder
The distance from central Michigan to John Donne's England is measured in more than miles. Yet the other day, as I strolled past the holiday decorations of this struggling industrial city, Donne's famous lines came to mind. "No man is an island," he wrote, "entire to itself; every man is a piece of the continent, a part of the main. " That's a sentiment easily overlooked. Why, after all, should someone who doesn't live here be concerned about Flint? It's a one-company town - and that company, General Motors, has had a tough year.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 1995 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Newark, N.J., is the auto-theft capital of the world, so the headlines say, and if New Jersey Drive is any evidence, not one motorist in the city has The Club. In other times, a high schooler like Jason Petty (Sharron Curley) would have defied authority by stealing hubcaps. But this is the 1990s, and as with every aspect of the economy, inflation has struck the crime world, too. Jason and his crew boost cars. It would be tempting to call this hot-wired urban drama Boyz Under the Hood, but there's little to joke about in writer-director Nick Gomez' keenly observed film about dead-end crimes on dead-end streets.
NEWS
September 19, 1992 | By Russell E. Eshleman Jr., INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
Common Cause asked House and Senate leaders yesterday to review all legislative car leases over the last five years, following an Ethics Commission ruling against a lawmaker accused of abusing the system. The citizen lobby, which monitors the conduct of public officials, made the request after a House Democratic leader said this week that further discipline was unnecessary in the case involving Rep. Richard Olasz (D., Allegheny). Olasz agreed in July to reimburse the state more than $6,200 for devising a "sham lease" on one state-paid vehicle and structuring a lease on another state-paid car that ultimately benefited his daughter.
NEWS
February 12, 2013 | By Jan Hefler, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The gravel lot tucked into a remote area of Gloucester County once housed a fleet of 100 yellow school buses that would rumble back and forth on weekdays. But when Hurricane Sandy hit in the fall - soon after the bus company moved out - the empty lot in Glassboro was assigned a new purpose: More than 300 vehicles that were damaged by raging rivers of saltwater were hauled to the five-acre property, Glassboro officials said. In New Jersey, lots like these have been tapped to temporarily hold an estimated 72,000 devastated cars, trucks, boats, and jet skis while they are processed for resale or salvaged parts.
NEWS
October 6, 2000 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Benjamin Orr, who cofounded the '80s rock band the Cars and sang on several of the group's hits, died Tuesday of pancreatic cancer. News reports gave his age variously as 45 and 53. Mr. Orr died at his Atlanta home, said Billy Johnson, manager of the musician's current band, Big People. Mr. Orr was diagnosed with the disease in May. Mr. Orr, born Benjamin Orzechowski in Cleveland, formed the Cars in Boston in 1976 with fellow Ohio native Ric Ocasek. He played bass and sang lead vocals on several of the band's hits, including "Drive" and "Just What I Needed.
NEWS
December 11, 1987 | By KIT KONOLIGE, Daily News Staff Writer
SEPTA has taken a step to improve the accident-plagued Norristown High Speed Line by removing its old "bullet cars" from weekday service. The five bullet cars moved to weekend-only service are among the oldest cars SEPTA uses. They were built in 1931. The action was taken following a recent study suggesting that a greater risk of damage would result from a collision between a bullet car and another type of vehicle than from between two bullet cars or two non-bullet cars. This is because the bumper mechanism (called an anti-climber)
NEWS
May 3, 1999 | Inquirer photographs by Bonnie Weller
The only things big about the vehicles scooting around the Benjamin Franklin Parkway yesterday were the hearts of the organizers and the drivers. The Mini Grand Prix was a charity event, with proceeds going to the Arthritis Foundation. Thirty souped-down, miniature Indy-style race cars competed in the seventh annual event.
NEWS
April 1, 2014
REMEMBER "American Graffiti"? Remember the hamburger-shop drive-in where all the cool kids with cars hung out? (That was California. Around here it was Hot Shoppes.) Did anything better capture the love affair between the automobile and the American teenager? It looks as though the romance is fading like a summer tan. That observation follows reporting by the Delaware Valley Regional Planning Commission that automobile use around here is down. The "why" is intriguing.
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