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NEWS
January 23, 2014 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Chester County woman abandoned her car in front of an oncoming train Tuesday after getting stuck under a lowered crossing gate in Royersford, the police said. The gate came down on Victoria Campbell's Ford Focus at about 12:22 p.m. as she was inching over the Main Street crossing, said Thomas Nerlinger, the Royersford acting police chief. Nerlinger, who happened to be a few vehicles back at the crossing, said the conductor was unable to stop the 50-car freight train before it collided with the car. "I saw the gate fly up and then a big puff of snow," he said.
BUSINESS
January 6, 2014 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Columnist
You may or may not think it's fair that your credit history could play a key role in setting your auto-insurance premiums - a long-running debate in insurance regulation, though a battle that insurers so far appear to have won. Only a handful of states - California, Massachusetts, and Hawaii - have limited credit scores' use in insurance pricing. If you pay bills promptly and have a top credit score, you likely benefit. But you suffer if you occasionally fall short, which is why groups such as the Consumer Federation of America contend that the practice discriminates against low- and middle-income drivers.
NEWS
December 28, 2013 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
A man suspected of stealing a pizza-delivery car in South Philadelphia was shot in the arm Thursday night when he allegedly tried to run down officers in an attempt to evade arrest, police said. Shortly after 9 p.m., the 29-year-old man allegedly stole the car, a Honda, at 10th and Catharine Streets in Bella Vista, said Chief Inspector Scott Small. The deliveryman had left the Honda running with the keys in the ignition, and the man just drove off with the car, Small said. At 22d Street and Snyder Avenue, police saw the Honda driving north and tried to stop the vehicle, Small said.
NEWS
December 26, 2013 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
Expensive cars in the front. Cheap cars in the back. John Silva's display strategy has worked well in attracting business to his car dealership in Frankford. But on Monday, a major water main broke across the street, sending water gushing into his car lot and other businesses. "It was all my front line," Silva said Tuesday of his BMW and Mercedes vehicles that were destroyed by the quick-moving current. "My crappy cars were in the back, on the hill. Those were fine. " About 23 million gallons of water broke free from a 106-year-old water main at Frankford and Torresdale Avenues, flooding nearby streets and businesses, including a small ice cream shop and a large CVS. The damage was still being assessed Tuesday.
NEWS
December 16, 2013 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
With new lights, colors, and digital displays, No. 1047 looks terrific on the inside. Outside, its silvery skin also gleams. The 45-year-old PATCO car has undergone more than a cosmetic makeover; a recent $1.6 million overhaul includes new or rebuilt electronic, mechanical, and other systems. But even though the undercarriage - wheels, gearbox, and other components - have been rehabilitated, they're the originals from 1968, when the car was built by the Budd Co. in Philadelphia. And even refurbishing the entire 120-car fleet (that's the $195 million project)
NEWS
December 13, 2013 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
PATCO unveiled the first of its refurbished commuter railcars Wednesday, showing off vehicles with brighter colors, higher ceilings, better lighting, digital displays, new seats, video screens, and security cameras. Seating capacity, though, will be slightly reduced in the new cars, because of handicapped-accessible seating and a closed cab area for the operator. The first two of PATCO's 120 cars are back from the factory in Hornell, N.Y., where the $194 million makeover is being done, and PATCO officials and reporters were given a tour of the cars in the transit agency's Lindenwold shop Wednesday.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 7, 2013 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
We've heard a lot over the last year about how special interests keep trying to sabotage Philadelphia's new zoning code. First in line, of course, would be City Council, whose members often behave as if their office gave them the right to exact tribute from development projects. Then there are the developers who bring in legal wizards to jiggle the locks on the system. Now, add one more interest group: neighborhood associations. You might expect this constituency to eagerly embrace the code's progressive urban ideas, but that's not the case when it comes to the emotional hot-button of parking.
BUSINESS
December 3, 2013 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Inquirer Columnist
The $70,000 Tesla Model S automobile might be the ultimate holiday gift, but is its parent a good addition to your portfolio? Growth managers say, yes, Tesla Motors Inc. (TSLA) represents not only the vanguard of electric cars, but also a healthy growth stock. Growth portfolios differ from value portfolios. The former seeks to invest in companies expanding at a rapid pace; value holdings often trade at a discount and might also throw off some dividend income. "If you haven't driven the new Tesla, head up to the dealership at King of Prussia and get on the waiting list," says James Cox, financial adviser with Devon Financial Partners in Wayne.
NEWS
November 16, 2013 | By Julie Zauzmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
SWARTHMORE Amid an ordinary day of teaching classes and supervising lab experiments, Swarthmore College instructor Carr Everbach got the sort of call one afternoon that most professors never receive. A solar panel on a police car was smoking, the caller said. Everbach found himself running to the police station to help handle the smoldering car, the sort of town-gown collaboration that he had not imagined. He helped stopped the panel from smoking, and if his ongoing experiment is a success, he plans to provide more assistance to the Swarthmore Borough Police Department than just amateur firefighting.
NEWS
November 12, 2013 | BY STEPHANIE FARR, Daily News Staff Writer farrs@phillynews.com, 215-854-4225
LUCY THE LAB'S tale wags happily at the end, but it began under the most a-paw-ling of circumstances. About 2 p.m. Friday, one of Lucy's owners, Jeff Rickards, left her in his idling Hyundai Sonata while he went into a house on Turner Avenue near Cedar Lane in Upper Darby to drop off a gift for a young family member. While inside the house, Upper Darby police said, Nicholas Dorner, 23, who had stolen three other cars in the past two weeks, jumped into Rickards' vehicle and took off for Philadelphia.
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