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NEWS
October 24, 2004 | By Tirdad Derakhshani INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If more proof were needed that hip-hop has entered mainstream American culture, this is it: an animated series about rappers. And who better to put one together than veteran rapper and accomplished actor Ice Cube, who, according to Variety, is teaming up with Futurama cocreator David X. Cohen to create Grandmaster Freak & the Furious 15, a half-hour cartoon set in Englewood, N.J. (home of hip-hop pioneer Sugar Hill Records) in the early '80s, when the genre was just blossoming.
NEWS
November 19, 2012
Lucille Bliss, 96, who provided the cute, husky voice for the title character in the groundbreaking television cartoon series Crusader Rabbit in 1949, and later for Smurfette on the 1980s series The Smurfs , died Nov. 8 in Costa Mesa, Calif. David Scheve, a producer-director for TDA Animation who had worked with her in recent years, confirmed her death. Ms. Bliss' role as the voice of Crusader - the feisty little rabbit who seeks adventure beside his big, dumb buddy, Rags the Tiger - "made her one of the very first television stars," said Mark Evanier, an animation historian and voice director.
NEWS
November 17, 2006 | By David Hiltbrand INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Nicktoons trumpets its newest acquisition, Skyland, which debuts tomorrow at 9 p.m., as "a revolutionary animated series. " The channel has reason to crow. This is the first TV cartoon to rival the richly imaginative work of Japanese animation master Hayao Miyazaki (Howl's Moving Castle). Skyland, a French production, has a remarkable three-dimensional look, thanks to the use of motion capture, CGI and other techniques. But it's the setting and the story that really make it special.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 23, 2010 | By Rick Bentley, McClatchy Newspapers
Two action films hit stores Tuesday, but it's a TV series that should get your attention this week. My Boys: The Complete Second & Third Season: One of the most underappreciated actors on TV is Jordana Spiro, who plays PJ Franklin in this always funny TBS cable series. Grade: B-plus PJ and her "boys" (Michael Bunin, Jim Gaffigan, Reid Scott, and Kyle Howard) are the best group of friends on TV since Friends. Most of the plots revolve around PJ, who wants to be one of the guys but also find a man. The DVD set includes 18 episodes that will get you caught up with one of cable's best comedies.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 2010 | By HOWARD GENSLER Daily News wire services contributed to this report
WRITING TATTLE these days is almost like writing for Adult Video News. First up is the story reported by TV Guide that porn star Sasha Grey ("Sasha Grey's Anatomy") will play herself (as opposed to play with herself, as she does brilliantly in her normal job) in a multi-episode arc as Vince's girlfriend on HBO's "Entourage. " "I think Sasha's going to have a very successful transition," said "Entourage" creator Doug Ellin, who was impressed by her work in Steven Soderbergh's non-porn 2009 film, "The Girlfriend Experience.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 1986 | By JOSEPH P. BLAKE, Daily News Staff Writer
It had to happen sooner or later. The dolls and the toys should have tipped you off that not far behind was, yes, a cartoon series based on the highly successful "Rambo" movies starring Sylvester Stallone. The animated "Rambo" will begin sometime next month on Channel 57, along with another "action/adventure" cartoon called "The Centurions. " So far, the two shows are scheduled to air in April only. (For the real thing, Channel 3 is featuring the original Rambo movie, "First Blood," at 9 tonight.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 2002 | By FRED SHUSTER Los Angeles Daily News
YOU DON'T need to see around corners to know "The Powerpuff Girls Movie," which opened Wednesday, will draw herds of pint-size viewers to multiplexes through the holiday weekend no matter what the reviews. Full-length cartoons like "Powerpuff" are deemed critic-proof since the target audience only knows what they've heard from playground pals and seen in carefully placed commercials. And observers say it's a genre of light entertainment that'll stick around. Among factors ensuring TV cartoon spin-offs continue to be developed and marketed is the built-in audience for such fare.
NEWS
November 7, 1990 | By Barbara Beck, Special to The Inquirer
Early last year a British publishing company was offered the chance to produce a series of books based on a wildly successful American cartoon series. Something called Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles. It declined, doubting that a slimy crew of pizza-guzzling, crime-fighting turtles from the New York sewers could capture the affection of British children, weaned on the gentler charms of Paddington Bear, Winnie the Pooh and a kind mailman named Postman Pat. Little did it know that just one year later, all of Britain would be in the grip of Turtlemania, and that Donatello, Michaelangelo, Raphael and Leonardo would become lean, green money machines.
NEWS
May 22, 1988 | By Francie Scott, Special to The Inquirer
Picture this scene from police work in the suburbs: An officer has been ambushed by three men who knock him to the ground and pin him down. He urgently calls for help on his radio, which then flies from his hand and lands beyond his reach. As one attacker sits on his back and twists the officer's leg, the policeman hears the dispatcher respond to his call. "Please repeat your location. . . . Your first transmission was cut out by another car. " It is a fictional scene from the pen of Whitemarsh patrol officer Guy Anhorn, but the cartoon portrays a real fear among police officers.
NEWS
April 6, 1991 | By Lee Winfrey, Inquirer TV Writer
An excellent new children's cartoon series, the return of a consistently pleasant country-music series and a special by one of the most bizarre of contemporary comedians add up to a tasty menu on cable television today. The half-hour animated series, Darkwing Duck, will debut at 8:30 a.m. on the Disney Channel. It stars a single parent, Drake Mallard, who moonlights as a caped crime fighter, Darkwing Duck. American Music Shop will begin its second season on the Nashville Network (TNN)
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NEWS
November 19, 2012
Lucille Bliss, 96, who provided the cute, husky voice for the title character in the groundbreaking television cartoon series Crusader Rabbit in 1949, and later for Smurfette on the 1980s series The Smurfs , died Nov. 8 in Costa Mesa, Calif. David Scheve, a producer-director for TDA Animation who had worked with her in recent years, confirmed her death. Ms. Bliss' role as the voice of Crusader - the feisty little rabbit who seeks adventure beside his big, dumb buddy, Rags the Tiger - "made her one of the very first television stars," said Mark Evanier, an animation historian and voice director.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 23, 2010 | By Rick Bentley, McClatchy Newspapers
Two action films hit stores Tuesday, but it's a TV series that should get your attention this week. My Boys: The Complete Second & Third Season: One of the most underappreciated actors on TV is Jordana Spiro, who plays PJ Franklin in this always funny TBS cable series. Grade: B-plus PJ and her "boys" (Michael Bunin, Jim Gaffigan, Reid Scott, and Kyle Howard) are the best group of friends on TV since Friends. Most of the plots revolve around PJ, who wants to be one of the guys but also find a man. The DVD set includes 18 episodes that will get you caught up with one of cable's best comedies.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 2010 | By HOWARD GENSLER Daily News wire services contributed to this report
WRITING TATTLE these days is almost like writing for Adult Video News. First up is the story reported by TV Guide that porn star Sasha Grey ("Sasha Grey's Anatomy") will play herself (as opposed to play with herself, as she does brilliantly in her normal job) in a multi-episode arc as Vince's girlfriend on HBO's "Entourage. " "I think Sasha's going to have a very successful transition," said "Entourage" creator Doug Ellin, who was impressed by her work in Steven Soderbergh's non-porn 2009 film, "The Girlfriend Experience.
NEWS
November 17, 2006 | By David Hiltbrand INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Nicktoons trumpets its newest acquisition, Skyland, which debuts tomorrow at 9 p.m., as "a revolutionary animated series. " The channel has reason to crow. This is the first TV cartoon to rival the richly imaginative work of Japanese animation master Hayao Miyazaki (Howl's Moving Castle). Skyland, a French production, has a remarkable three-dimensional look, thanks to the use of motion capture, CGI and other techniques. But it's the setting and the story that really make it special.
NEWS
October 24, 2004 | By Tirdad Derakhshani INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If more proof were needed that hip-hop has entered mainstream American culture, this is it: an animated series about rappers. And who better to put one together than veteran rapper and accomplished actor Ice Cube, who, according to Variety, is teaming up with Futurama cocreator David X. Cohen to create Grandmaster Freak & the Furious 15, a half-hour cartoon set in Englewood, N.J. (home of hip-hop pioneer Sugar Hill Records) in the early '80s, when the genre was just blossoming.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 2002 | By FRED SHUSTER Los Angeles Daily News
YOU DON'T need to see around corners to know "The Powerpuff Girls Movie," which opened Wednesday, will draw herds of pint-size viewers to multiplexes through the holiday weekend no matter what the reviews. Full-length cartoons like "Powerpuff" are deemed critic-proof since the target audience only knows what they've heard from playground pals and seen in carefully placed commercials. And observers say it's a genre of light entertainment that'll stick around. Among factors ensuring TV cartoon spin-offs continue to be developed and marketed is the built-in audience for such fare.
LIVING
September 13, 1998 | By Christopher Cornell, FOR THE INQUIRER
Saturday morning isn't what it used to be. Baby boomers recall fondly the era when all three major networks devoted a block of programming from about 7 a.m. to noon on Saturdays to nonstop breakfast-cereal and toy commercials, occasionally interrupted by cartoons of varying quality. Just saying the names - Linus the Lionhearted, Beanie and Cecil, Josie & the Pussycats - is enough to cause a typical 40-year-old to suddenly recall the taste of soggy Froot Loops. It has been a gradual process, but Saturday morning is no longer the monolithic block of cartoons it once was. Some may blame the legion of do-gooders who seem determined to take everything fun about Saturday morning and make it wholesome.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 15, 1996 | By Christopher Cornell, FOR THE INQUIRER
You've probably heard or read about the new campaign to get TV producers to create better, more educational shows for children. And if you're a kid, you're probably worried to death about what these do-gooders are going to do to Saturday mornings. Relax, kids. A quick look at the new shows for children this fall reveals they are heavy on fun, light on learning. Here's what's in store. CBS. Somebody at CBS has apparently been taking notes. One of the big trends in kids TV is live-action series seen from a preteen's point of view (such as Nickelodeon's Pete and Pete and Clarissa Explains It All)
ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 1994 | By Jonathan Storm, INQUIRER TELEVISION CRITIC
The networks have readied a landslide of new TV shows for winter and spring to replace the dogs of autumn. None of them is earth-shattering, but several, because of ambition or originality, seem destined to cause tremors on the broadcast schedule. And if you had left the balmy sunshine of Houston or Miami, or even the predictable frigid slipperiness of Philadelphia or Detroit, to get your bones rattled in California by a terrifying shift in the earth's crust, you might use a few earthquake adjectives, too. Monday's 6.6 Richter shaker rattled the nation's television critics, who were gathered here for their semiannual meeting, out of the general torpor induced by an unremarkable couple of weeks of presentations of midseason programming.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 1992 | By Jonathan Storm, Inquirer Television Critic
Gloom and doom, Sturm und Drang, nickels and dimes, Tequila and Bonetti - the TV networks finished their semiannual press circus last week under all sorts of black clouds, just as the sun was coming out in soggy Southern California. These are hard times for the commercial networks, jacketed by what they see as unfair rules, and buffeted by cable competition, high program costs and a crummy advertising climate. But like the post office - an apt simile, considering the quality of much of what they show - the networks can deliver in good times and bad: Twenty-two new series will be clamoring for attention this winter and into spring.
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