CollectionsCartoon Show
IN THE NEWS

Cartoon Show

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
October 8, 2012
John Rovick, 93, the beloved host of a children's show in Los Angeles throughout the 1950s and '60s, died Saturday in Boise, Idaho, after a brief illness, his former station, KTTV-TV, told the Associated Press. For nearly two decades, Mr. Rovick appeared on the daily Cartoon Time show that earned him an Emmy Award for outstanding children's program. It was so popular that KTTV said it added another Rovick show, Sheriff John's Lunch Brigade , that stayed on the air until 1970.
NEWS
December 23, 2004 | By Elizabeth Wellington INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
We '70s kids watched Fat Albert and the Cosby Kids all the time. I remember wearing patchwork jeans, a bumblebee T-shirt, and singing "Nah, nah, nah, gonna have a good time . . . Hey, hey, hey!" I was so small, not only didn't my feet touch the floor, they didn't even reach past the edge of the couch. Those were simpler times, you know, when carpet was a luxury and hardwood floors were standard. Wall-paneling wasn't considered retro. Sisters shared rooms outfitted with twin beds and Raggedy Ann dolls, not televisions and telephones.
NEWS
February 7, 1990 | By Jonathan Storm, Inquirer Staff Writer
Two new series - ABC's America's Funniest Home Videos and Fox's The Simpsons - made significant breakthroughs in the Nielsen ratings for the week that ended Sunday, while unusual scheduling exposed weakness in a third, NBC's Grand. Home Videos finished a sterling seventh in the ratings, knocking Angela Lansbury's perennial CBS powerhouse, Murder, She Wrote, to a rare position outside the top 10. The half-hour Home Videos and hour-long Murder air at 8 p.m. Sundays. The unseating of Murder, She Wrote is especially disappointing to CBS, which is third in the season-to-date Nielsens and counts on its Sunday-evening lineup - led by 60 Minutes - for a sure ratings win. The Simpsons, Fox's adult cartoon show about a family with seriously funny problems, is bad news for CBS, too. The show, which airs at 8:30 Sundays, came in 32d in the Nielsens, one of the best ratings ever for a Fox series.
NEWS
January 29, 2013 | BY CHUCK DARROW, Daily News Staff Writer darrowc@phillynews.com, 215-313-3134
SALLY STARR, the vivacious and maternal blonde TV cowgirl who served as a surrogate parent for the Philadelphia region's baby boomers, died Sunday morning, two days after her 90th birthday. Starr died peacefully in a South Jersey nursing home shortly after 6 a.m., according to Michael Yip, a close friend of Starr's. She had been in poor health for years, both from various natural causes as well as from the effects of a 2005 car crash. The precise cause of death was not immediately known.
NEWS
May 23, 2010 | By Walter F. Naedele, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
William W. Webber, 80, a fixture on Philadelphia radio and TV for more than 50 years, died Sunday of a heart attack at Presbyterian Medical Center in Philadelphia while awaiting heart surgery there later this week, his son, William W. Jr., said. He lived on Rittenhouse Square. Known as Wee Willie at 6 feet, 5 inches, Mr. Webber was a workhorse, a host of children's TV shows and a radio disc jockey, often on the same days. In 1956, he became host of a two-hour morning children's cartoon show on Channel 6 that ran into the '60s.
NEWS
January 2, 1993 | by Gloria Campisi, Daily News Staff Writer
Sally Starr, TV's cowgirl sidekick to a generation of Baby Boomers, suffered a major heart attack while hosting a New Year's Eve party in Northeast Philadelphia. Starr, cowgirl hostess of a children's cartoon show on Channel 6 for two decades, was brought to Frankford Hospital's Frankford Campus in critical condition by a Fire Department rescue unit at 1:16 a.m. yesterday, a hospital spokesman said. By later yesterday, Starr had improved to guarded condition, said hospital spokesman Ed Kiernan.
NEWS
May 24, 2010 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
William W. Webber, 80, a fixture on Philadelphia radio and TV for more than 50 years, died of a heart attack Sunday at Penn Presbyterian Medical Center while awaiting heart surgery there later this week, said his son, William W. Jr. He lived on Rittenhouse Square. Known as "Wee Willie" at 6-foot-5, Mr. Webber was a workhorse, a host of children's TV shows and a radio disc jockey, often on the same days. In 1956, he became host of a Channel 6 two-hour morning cartoon show that ran into the '60s.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 5, 1990 | By Renee Lucas Wayne, Daily News Staff Writer
Jeff Bergman is a man possessed, the kind of man who constantly hears voices in his head. Fortunately, these voices don't instruct this Yardley resident to hijack airplanes, blow up bridges or mow down innocent bystanders at the mall. They may get a little rowdy, but the closest any one comes to mayhem is the slobbery utterance "You're deth-spic-able!" Bergman has earned the right to be a slightly daffy duck. As successor to the late Mel Blanc - who died last July 10, on Bergman's 29th birthday - he's the mouth behind 14 of Warner Bros.
NEWS
January 3, 1987 | By David Bianculli, Inquirer TV Critic
Today, weather permitting, the Mummers will strut down Broad Street and pre-empt Channel 3's daytime programming. The Mummers, of course, were scheduled originally for New Year's Day, but, for the second time in three years, the weather pre-empted the parade. Independent station Channel 29, though, should hold a parade of its own: It is inheriting NBC's AFC playoff game and three of its highly rated cartoons. DAYTIME HIGHLIGHTS MUMMERS PARADE (8 a.m., Ch. 3) - If at first you don't succeed, move it to Saturday.
NEWS
December 8, 1990 | By Lee Winfrey, Inquirer TV Writer
Does NBA Inside Stuff represent the wave of the future in sports television? Even though it's a pretty show, let's hope not. NBA Inside Stuff, co-hosted by Ahmad Rashad and Julie Moran, is the first series produced by a major professional sports league for a broadcast network. Created by NBA Entertainment Inc. for NBC, the weekly half-hour airs here at 10:30 a.m. Saturdays on Channel 3. The danger with a show like this is that viewers won't realize that it's essentially puffery.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 29, 2013 | BY CHUCK DARROW, Daily News Staff Writer darrowc@phillynews.com, 215-313-3134
SALLY STARR, the vivacious and maternal blonde TV cowgirl who served as a surrogate parent for the Philadelphia region's baby boomers, died Sunday morning, two days after her 90th birthday. Starr died peacefully in a South Jersey nursing home shortly after 6 a.m., according to Michael Yip, a close friend of Starr's. She had been in poor health for years, both from various natural causes as well as from the effects of a 2005 car crash. The precise cause of death was not immediately known.
NEWS
January 27, 2013
When it comes to telling tales about your children, a prudent writer's task is to hold all that stuff inside until the children are grown up and you write your memoirs, which no one will read except your children, who will look less for art than for signs of betrayal. Over the years, our three children have known the unexpected joy/humiliation of having Dad write about private family moments and sharing those personal moments with hundreds of thousands of strangers reading this newspaper.
NEWS
October 8, 2012
John Rovick, 93, the beloved host of a children's show in Los Angeles throughout the 1950s and '60s, died Saturday in Boise, Idaho, after a brief illness, his former station, KTTV-TV, told the Associated Press. For nearly two decades, Mr. Rovick appeared on the daily Cartoon Time show that earned him an Emmy Award for outstanding children's program. It was so popular that KTTV said it added another Rovick show, Sheriff John's Lunch Brigade , that stayed on the air until 1970.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 14, 2012 | By Howard Shapiro, Inquirer Staff Writer
It's the little inventive stuff in children's theater that can excite the kids and charm the adults. In its first stab at family theater, the young Off-Color Theatre Company's original show, Tiny Tales From a Big Chair , has the clever stuff, but not enough. Tiny Tales is supposed to be a comedy - the troupe, mostly University of the Arts grads, came together in the 2009 Live Arts Festival/Philly Fringe with a mission to create comedy. The show is lighthearted throughout, but not as funny as it tries to be. It lacks the constant stream of stage business that would raise it a notch from merely amusing.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 2011 | By Jonathan Storm, Inquirer Columnist
Stuffing a henhouse full of eggs into one big basket, Fox surprised no one Monday by announcing that one-sixth of its entire fall schedule will be filled by another Simon Cowell singing competition show, The X Factor. The network thinks it has a second blockbuster in waiting, Steven Spielberg's Terra Nova, about a family that journeys back in time to try to point civilization on a happier course. Fox adds two sitcoms and a cartoon show for fall and will hold four series for midseason.
NEWS
May 24, 2010 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
William W. Webber, 80, a fixture on Philadelphia radio and TV for more than 50 years, died of a heart attack Sunday at Penn Presbyterian Medical Center while awaiting heart surgery there later this week, said his son, William W. Jr. He lived on Rittenhouse Square. Known as "Wee Willie" at 6-foot-5, Mr. Webber was a workhorse, a host of children's TV shows and a radio disc jockey, often on the same days. In 1956, he became host of a Channel 6 two-hour morning cartoon show that ran into the '60s.
NEWS
May 23, 2010 | By Walter F. Naedele, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
William W. Webber, 80, a fixture on Philadelphia radio and TV for more than 50 years, died Sunday of a heart attack at Presbyterian Medical Center in Philadelphia while awaiting heart surgery there later this week, his son, William W. Jr., said. He lived on Rittenhouse Square. Known as Wee Willie at 6 feet, 5 inches, Mr. Webber was a workhorse, a host of children's TV shows and a radio disc jockey, often on the same days. In 1956, he became host of a two-hour morning children's cartoon show on Channel 6 that ran into the '60s.
NEWS
May 27, 2005 | By Gayle Ronan Sims INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Cartoonist Pauline Comanor, 91, who as a young girl made a pretty good living helping draw Betty Boop films and later in life depended on Chunky Monkey, died of heart failure Sunday at Southern Ocean County Hospital in Manahawkin, N.J. Born in West Philadelphia, she lived in Little Egg Harbor Township, N.J. Ms. Comanor started drawing cartoons before graduating from West Philadelphia High School in 1932. As a teenager, she demonstrated how-to cartoon sets in Gimbels' auditorium for $15 a session.
NEWS
December 23, 2004 | By Elizabeth Wellington INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
We '70s kids watched Fat Albert and the Cosby Kids all the time. I remember wearing patchwork jeans, a bumblebee T-shirt, and singing "Nah, nah, nah, gonna have a good time . . . Hey, hey, hey!" I was so small, not only didn't my feet touch the floor, they didn't even reach past the edge of the couch. Those were simpler times, you know, when carpet was a luxury and hardwood floors were standard. Wall-paneling wasn't considered retro. Sisters shared rooms outfitted with twin beds and Raggedy Ann dolls, not televisions and telephones.
NEWS
July 8, 2003 | By Robert Strauss FOR THE INQUIRER
It's a Philadelphia thing - that postcard of the man in the Indian headdress. The day after my 52d birthday, I look around at the detritus of youth - the autograph from Wilt Chamberlain, the figurines of baseball stars like Ted Williams and Luis Aparicio, my metal Howdy Doody lunch box - things almost any middle-aged guy understands. But to appreciate the man in the feathered headdress smiling out at me - Chief Halftown - you had to grow up here. The Chief, Traynor Ora Halftown, died Saturday at age 86 from diabetes in Brigantine, N.J., and he was the last of a breed.
1 | 2 | 3 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|