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NEWS
January 4, 2012
British cartoonist Ronald Searle, 91, creator of the willfully wicked schoolgirls of St. Trinian's who amused generations of Britons, died "peacefully in his sleep" Friday in Draguignan in southern France after a short illness. Mr. Searle was a prolific illustrator who drew for the New Yorker, Punch, and Walt Disney, but it was the fictional girls' boarding school where the students ran riot that most captured the public imagination. The long-legged, leering schoolgirls drank, smoked, and generally cut a swath of destruction; their weapon-wielding antics were colored by Mr. Searle's morbid sense of humor.
NEWS
May 22, 2011
Bill Rechin, 80, a cartoonist known for the syndicated Crock strip that parodies life in a Foreign Legion desert outpost, died at home Saturday in Spotsylvania County, Va., of complications from esophageal cancer. In 1975, Mr. Rechin, Don Wilder, and Brant Parker created the strip as a parody of the Foreign Legion classic Beau Geste . The strip, which follows the adventures of Vermin P. Crock and an assortment of characters at a grim desert outpost, appears in more than 200 newspapers.
NEWS
March 31, 2012
Rex Babin, 49, the Sacramento Bee editorial cartoonist whose piercing pen skewered presidents, governors and self-important legislators, died Friday at his home after a long battle with cancer. Mr. Babin's favorite cartoons were often his most poignant. After the attacks on the World Trade Center towers in 2001, he drew Libertas slumped and weeping with her head in her hands. After Chesley "Sully" Sullenberger III landed US Airways Flight 1549 in the Hudson River, Mr. Babin imagined the passengers standing on the wings with the hands of God reaching down to keep the jet from sinking.
NEWS
January 23, 2003 | Daily News Wire Services
Pulitzer Prize-winning cartoonist Bill Mauldin, whose darkly humorous renderings of GIs Willie and Joe won him the admiration of World War II combat veterans, died yesterday in Newport Beach, Calif., after a long battle with Alzheimer's disease. Mauldin, 81, served as an Army sergeant in Europe, where he drew inspiration from rank-and-file soldiers battling the enemy, loneliness, fear - and know-nothing officers. Many combat veterans saw their own stories in Mauldin's drawings, published in the military newspaper Stars & Stripes, and many tracked down the cartoonist as he lay dying in a Newport Beach nursing home to send him tributes and good wishes.
NEWS
May 1, 2015
D AILY NEWS editorial cartoonist Signe Wilkinson has added two big accolades to her collection. Yesterday Wilkinson was named grand-prize winner of the 15th World Press Freedom International Editorial Cartoon Competition of cartoonists' responses to the terrorist attack on the Paris-based magazine Charlie Hebdo in January. The competition attracted 300 cartoons from 43 nations. And last night, the Overseas Press Club of America, at its 76th annual awards ceremony in New York, gave Wilkinson its Thomas Nast Award for international cartooning - an award she won twice before, in 1996 and 2007.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 2, 1990 | By Renee Lucas Wayne, Daily News Staff Writer
At some point, even the demented have to rest. Such was the case for cartoonist Gary Larson, creator of that wacked-out panel "The Far Side. " In October 1988, Larson put down his pencil, pushed back his artists' chair, walked out of the studio and embarked on a sabbatical from the drawing table - taking a leave of absence after nearly 10 years of producing one of the most successful panels in comic history. He traveled throughout Africa and the Amazon. He spent four months in New York.
NEWS
September 16, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Tony Auth, 72, of Wynnewood, the Pulitzer Prize-winning cartoonist and mainstay of The Inquirer's editorial page for four decades before resigning in 2012 to become a digital artist, has died. Mr. Auth had been under treatment for metastatic brain cancer. David Leopold, his friend and curator, said he died at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania on Sunday, Sept. 14, four days after his supporters had announced a fund-raising effort for an archive devoted to his work at Temple University.
NEWS
May 9, 2014 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
As though going through a Rolodex, Roz Chast cycles through some of the reasons she had such a complicated, difficult relationship with her parents. "They both grew up poor. They were born in 1912, so they graduated college into the Depression. Their experiences were . . . just awful," said the New Yorker cartoonist, who delves into that troubled relationship in her graphic memoir, Can't We Talk About Something More Pleasant? , published Tuesday by Bloomsbury. Chast, 59, whose work is acclaimed for its wry humor and off-kilter style, will discuss the book at the Free Library of Philadelphia's Central Library at 7:30 p.m. Monday.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 2011
MOORE COLLEGE of Art has honored painters, interior decorators and fashions designers with its Visionary Woman Award. This year, three more women have joined the Visionary ranks, including Daily News political cartoonist Signe Wilkinson. The award is made annually to women whose work and leadership have had a major influence on the visual arts, but Wilkinson is the first illustrator to win this award. "We thought she was a pioneer in the industry," said Moore College President Happy Fernandez.
NEWS
July 22, 1999 | By William Lamb, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
With an indelible marker in hand and an easel-mounted pad nearby, Jump Start cartoonist Robb Armstrong shared his life story with young fans at the Lansdowne Public Library yesterday morning, drawing on a healthy reserve of energy and a keen sense of humor to deliver a positive message. "I'm not really here to tell everybody how to be a cartoonist," Armstrong said. "It's more about doing what you want to do with your life. "I think about when I was little doing cartoons, and this is what I do for a living.
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NEWS
May 1, 2015
D AILY NEWS editorial cartoonist Signe Wilkinson has added two big accolades to her collection. Yesterday Wilkinson was named grand-prize winner of the 15th World Press Freedom International Editorial Cartoon Competition of cartoonists' responses to the terrorist attack on the Paris-based magazine Charlie Hebdo in January. The competition attracted 300 cartoons from 43 nations. And last night, the Overseas Press Club of America, at its 76th annual awards ceremony in New York, gave Wilkinson its Thomas Nast Award for international cartooning - an award she won twice before, in 1996 and 2007.
NEWS
December 19, 2014
LET ME BEGIN with a statement of fact. Editorial cartoons are not meant to be fair and they cannot hurt you. That said, they can, in the words of one of my ink-stained brethren, punctuate the conversation with satire, mockery and gross exaggeration, ridiculing and lampooning everything from pompous politicking to holier-than-thou hypocrisy. Nobody said it was pretty, but it is oh, so American. Cartoons are supposed to provoke thought, encourage speech and usher in change. And change cannot come soon enough.
NEWS
September 16, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Tony Auth, 72, of Wynnewood, the Pulitzer Prize-winning cartoonist and mainstay of The Inquirer's editorial page for four decades before resigning in 2012 to become a digital artist, has died. Mr. Auth had been under treatment for metastatic brain cancer. David Leopold, his friend and curator, said he died at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania on Sunday, Sept. 14, four days after his supporters had announced a fund-raising effort for an archive devoted to his work at Temple University.
NEWS
September 16, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
WHEN GENE Roberts became executive editor of the Inquirer in 1972, he intended to turn the paper into a journalistic powerhouse. First, he had to check out the staff to gauge its strengths and weaknesses, find out who would help him transform the paper from the lame publication it had become to a first-class regional paper. One name caught his eye. Tony Auth was the political cartoonist, and the astute Roberts recognized quickly that Tony would be an important contributor to his plans.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 22, 2014 | BY MATT NESTOR, Daily News Staff Writer nestorm@phillynews.com, 215-854-5906
THIS WORLD was too small for Andre the Giant. It seems our perception of the legendary wrestler was, too. With his latest project, Andre the Giant: Life and Legend , Philadelphia-based cartoonist Box Brown sets out to humanize the man who once tossed the real-life Rocky from the ring with ease. A graphic novel may not seem like the best medium for presenting what many considered a "mythical creature" as a man who could experience love, desire and regret. But Brown said he told Andre's story the only way he knew how. The project was inspired by many Andre the Giant tales Brown gleaned from interviews with retired wrestlers - some self-conducted, others from television shows and documentaries.
NEWS
May 9, 2014 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
As though going through a Rolodex, Roz Chast cycles through some of the reasons she had such a complicated, difficult relationship with her parents. "They both grew up poor. They were born in 1912, so they graduated college into the Depression. Their experiences were . . . just awful," said the New Yorker cartoonist, who delves into that troubled relationship in her graphic memoir, Can't We Talk About Something More Pleasant? , published Tuesday by Bloomsbury. Chast, 59, whose work is acclaimed for its wry humor and off-kilter style, will discuss the book at the Free Library of Philadelphia's Central Library at 7:30 p.m. Monday.
NEWS
February 28, 2014
WITH 18 venues nominated and more than 200 votes cast so far, the first round of the V for Veg Best Vegan Cheesesteak in Philly is buzzing. Two recent entries to the top five are making their mark as fans (and proprietors!) keep spreading the word. Blackbird Pizzeria is clearly out in front, but that first-place position doesn't look as unassailable as it did at first. In descending order: Carmen's at Reading Terminal Market, Govinda's Gourmet to Go, HipCityVeg and Hibiscus Juice Bar are also strong contenders.
NEWS
November 26, 2013 | By Kathy Boccella, Inquirer Staff Writer
In 2001, an 8-year-old from Springfield, Delaware County, named Hayden Dahmm - then severely vision-impaired but with a remarkable talent for drawing - made headlines by creating a comic book that starred a crime-fighting toilet and that raised more than $10,000 for the families of victims of the 9/11 attacks. Two years ago, Dahmm began creating a new improbable story. He walked onto an unfamiliar Swarthmore College campus with a white cane - "bumping into things," in his words - and a dream of accomplishing something not many before him have: overcoming his now-total blindness to become an engineer.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 2013
The Art of Controversy Political Cartoons and Their Enduring Power By Victor S. Navasky Alfred A. Knopf. 256 pp. $27.95 Reviewed by Jim Higgins   Few people afflict the comfortable more savagely and effectively than political cartoonists. In The Art of Controversy: Political Cartoons and Their Enduring Power , veteran magazine editor Victor S. Navasky investigates how they work and celebrates some of the greats, from pioneering artist William Hogarth to contemporary caricaturist David Levine.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 2012 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ellen Forney is feeling good. She's happy, energetic, ecstatic. So good it's unreal. She doesn't need to eat or sleep - there's too much to do! A cartoonist with a loyal following, she's bursting with new ideas. She's flying high, confident, and to her delight, hyper-sexualized. Little does she know that a few months later, she'll be so down, she'll be unable to get out of bed. So opens Marbles: Mania, Depression, Michelangelo, and Me , an exhilarating, immensely enjoyable graphic memoir by the Philadelphia-raised artist that chronicles her years-long struggle with bipolar disorder.
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