CollectionsCartoons
IN THE NEWS

Cartoons

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
August 22, 2011
Monthly Gallery Archive Cartoon
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 1990 | Daily News Wire Services
Marvel Productions will produce cartoons for movie theaters that will be shown the theaters just before Twentieth Century Fox Inc. releases, the two companies said. The studio said Monday that the cartoons, to be called "Fox Toons," should be ready for Fox summer movies in 1991. The studio's deal with Marvel follows a similar effort by Walt Disney Co., which has packaged Roger Rabbit cartoons with "Honey, I Shrunk the Kids" and "Dick Tracy. " The company did not say how many cartoons Marvel will produce.
NEWS
January 15, 2016
With regards to Signe Wilkinson's Jan. 7 commentary on Charlie Hebdo, one year year: What a treasure Wilkinson provides for us nearly every day, and how proud we should all be that her witty political cartoons and comic strips only scratch the surface of a questioning, curious and thoughtful intellect. Thank you, Ms. Wilkinson, for challenging us as Americans to honor our freedoms on the basis of equality and justice for all. Ben Burrows Elkins Park, Pa.  
ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 1987 | By JOSEPH P. BLAKE, Daily News Staff Writer
Independent television station executives know that the same kids who have to be cajoled into going to bed at a decent hour have no problem waking up at 6 a.m. to watch cartoons. Channel 29 greets the kiddies at 6:30 a.m. with "Fat Albert" and Channel 57 hypnotizes them at the same time with "Inspector Gadget. " Meanwhile, at 7 a.m., Channel 17 airs "Woody Woodpecker. " The stations continue airing cartoons throughout the day - except for a mid-afternoon break for such oldies as "The Munsters" and "Bewitched.
NEWS
November 24, 2002 | By Victoria Donohoe INQUIRER ART CRITIC
Swarthmore College is always surprising us when it comes to art. This month it's happening at McCabe Library with a 30-item solo exhibit featuring Clay Bennett, the 2002 winner of the Pulitzer Prize for editorial cartooning. Bennett produces editorial cartoons five days a week for the Christian Science Monitor, and his consistent ability to turn out very good work is shown by his being a finalist three years in a row before winning the Pulitzer. Born in South Carolina in 1958, the son of a much-traveled career Army officer of rock-ribbed Republican leanings, Clay Bennett had attended 10 schools by the time he graduated from high school in Huntsville, Ala. With his cartooning interests already apparent at the University of North Alabama, where he earned his college degree in art and history in 1980, Bennett was briefly a staff artist at the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette and Fayetteville (N.C.
SPORTS
June 29, 2010
THE NFL IS TEAMING with Nickelodeon on a series of short cartoons that will air during the season. "Rush Zone: Guardians of the Core" will be televised on Nickelodeon's Nicktoons channel and feature coaches and players from all 32 teams with several of them doing voice-overs as themselves. We can see it now: A roly-poly animated figure dressed entirely in black who looks up from a podium and, in a raspy voice, says, "Times yours. " Actually, we don't know if Andy Reid will be involved, but Giants quarterback Eli Manning and Saints coach Sean Payton already have signed on. The cartoons will be 2 to 5 minutes in length and center around a 10-year-old superhero who has the skills of an NFL player.
NEWS
June 8, 1989 | By John Corr, Inquirer Staff Writer Contributing to this report were the Associated Press, USA Today and the Washington Post
Garry Trudeau, who rarely shies from controversy, has withdrawn a series of Doonesbury cartoons about the student protests in China because of last weekend's massacre there. The cartoons, he said, were "predicated on a peaceful resolution" of the protests. But "that was a very bad miscalculation . . . and now obviously (the cartoons are) inappropriate," he said. The cartoons, which were to have run next week, have been withdrawn from all newspapers that carry the strip, including The Inquirer, and will be replaced by a series offering an "obtuse look at the Alaskan oil spill," Trudeau said.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 1993 | By Andy Wickstrom, FOR THE INQUIRER
For cartoon collectors, MGM/UA has provided a bonanza with its "Golden Age of Looney Tunes" series issued on videodisc over the span of two years. The four volumes (each containing five discs) preserve a total of 280 cartoons - enough, if watched on consecutive Saturday mornings, to inspire a yearlong adolescence. But that's not all, folks. At last the Walt Disney Co. has taken the cue and decided to flaunt its cartoon heritage in videodisc form. Next month, it will release Mickey Mouse: The Black & White Years, presenting 34 cartoons from 1928 to 1935.
NEWS
February 27, 2006 | By LINDA S. WALLACE
SO MANY WORDS have already been written and spoken about the Danish newspaper's decision to publish cartoons that set off a wave of protests - peaceful and violent - and riots by Muslims who reacted to what they felt was an affront to the Prophet Mohammad. We've heard from the historians, diplomats, chief executives, newspaper editors, social scientists and economists. I can't offer the learned analysis they did, but I can humbly present a way we might avoid these painful and costly cultural collisions.
NEWS
October 13, 1991 | By Victoria Donohoe, Inquirer Art Critic
Jules Feiffer, our nation's most versatile and unconventional pundit, launched his career by giving away cartoons to build a following. The Village Voice gladly received and began publishing these handouts regularly in 1956 when the Bronx-born Feiffer was 27. Suddenly the success of that new cartoon series, Feiffer, skyrocketed to mass circulation. His best-known comic strip, Feiffer is now syndicated in more than 100 newspapers worldwide, including The Inquirer. And for three decades now, he has been one of America's leading satirists.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 16, 2016 | By Stephan Salisbury, Staff Writer
It isn't every day, as Josh O'Neill put it, that you have an opportunity to publish work that shows something akin to a "teenage Shakespeare becoming Shakespeare. " But that's what O'Neill's Locust Moon Press in West Philadelphia believes it is doing. This week, Locust Moon officially brings out The Lost Work of Will Eisner , a 70-page compendium of the legendary cartoonist's very early work, much of it never seen before. For those unfamiliar with Eisner, who died in 2005, legendary is not a word used lightly here.
NEWS
May 30, 2016 | By Jake Blumgart
Jay Schwartz has been screening his personal collection of 16mm films for Philadelphia audiences since 1992. The first showings were at the Khyber Pass Pub in Old City, back when it was a grungy punk-rock bar. Since then he's ranged all over the city, from coffeehouses to, for the first time this year, the Art Museum. Schwartz is a lifelong resident of the city, growing up in the Northeast and now a resident of South Philly. He began collecting films in the pre-VHS dark ages, when the only chance to catch an old movie was on late-night TV or during a rare silver-screen rerelease.
NEWS
May 20, 2016
Cartoon 'insulting' Monday's paper had a front-page story, "Win or lose, Sanders powerful" and the commentaries "Single-payer essential to controlling health costs," "Providing permission for bigotry," and "Trump bringing out worst in millions of Americans. " Those pieces reinforced Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders' timely messages about inclusion, which are resonating with millions of people. So what's with the insulting, stereotypical editorial cartoon by Dave Granlund showing Sanders as a "fossil" and a "hippie, socialist revolutionary"?
NEWS
March 12, 2016
ISSUE | MEDIA Cartoon in bad taste It was disgusting to see Signe Wilkinson's editorial cartoon depicting Republican presidential candidates Donald Trump, Ted Cruz, and Marco Rubio in a whose-is-bigger moment (Wednesday). It seems the Republican front-runner's gutter mentality is influencing the thinking of an esteemed newspaper like the Inquirer. During last week's debate, the candidates were talking about hand size when Trump referred to his sexual prowess. But you folks have gone one step worse by illustrating it. I would have a difficult time explaining it to my child.
NEWS
February 20, 2016
ISSUE | ANTONIN SCALIA Disturbing cartoon Signe Wilkinson's editorial cartoon was an insult to the memory of Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia (Wednesday). It depicted a black man in a shirt labeled "Slaves: 3/5th" standing in the rain while the Founding Fathers mourned at Scalia's grave beneath an umbrella labeled "Original Constitution. " Scalia's "originalist" legal philosophy referred to the Constitution as it's now written, not to the original version, which was flawed with respect to slavery.
NEWS
January 15, 2016
With regards to Signe Wilkinson's Jan. 7 commentary on Charlie Hebdo, one year year: What a treasure Wilkinson provides for us nearly every day, and how proud we should all be that her witty political cartoons and comic strips only scratch the surface of a questioning, curious and thoughtful intellect. Thank you, Ms. Wilkinson, for challenging us as Americans to honor our freedoms on the basis of equality and justice for all. Ben Burrows Elkins Park, Pa.  
NEWS
January 8, 2016 | BY SIGNE WILKINSON
IN 1879, the then-wildly popular Puck Magazine published a cartoon by Joseph Keppler called "The Religious Vanity Fair. " In a two-page drawing, Keppler mockingly depicted "The Arcade of True Faith," featuring a Catholic priest selling indulgences, a hook-nosed Jew, a financial trickster Presbyterian, a polygamist Mormon, a mortify-your-body Methodist, a dotty Episcopalian priest, a rotund new-age preacher pushing the "Love Road to Heaven" and...
ENTERTAINMENT
November 7, 2015 | By Shaun Brady, For The Inquirer
Cartoonist Roz Chast always viewed her work as strongly reflecting her upbringing in a Jewish New York family. After the release of her graphic memoir, Can't We Talk About Something More Pleasant? - which recounts her struggle to deal with her parents' final years - she came to realize that her experience was surprisingly universal. "I've gotten so many letters from people who live in all kinds of different places," Chast said. "Someone from rural Washington will say, 'My father was a farmer and a Baptist, but he was just like your dad.' So maybe there are things that we might think of as Jewish or New York-centric, but they're less so than we think.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 9, 2015 | By Howard Gensler
IT WAS NOT ONLY a slow weekend on the celebrity non-news front, it was a slow weekend at the box office. Summer blockbusters gave way to niche films over a sleepy Labor Day weekend, with notable performances from the faith-based "War Room" and the Spanish language cartoon "Un Gallo con Muchos Huevos. " "War Room" fought its way to first place in its second weekend in release, earning $12.6 million across the four-day holiday weekend, according to Rentrak estimates on yesterday.
NEWS
August 28, 2015 | By Molly Eichel, Inquirer Staff Writer
JemCon, a convention celebrating the 1980s cartoon Jem , hits the Philadelphia area this weekend. If the Jem theme song has anything to do with it, the convention is sure to be truly, truly, truly outrageous. The cartoon, created by Christy Marx, ran from 1985 to 1988 and has a small but dedicated fan base that worships at the altar of Jerrica Benton - owner of Starlight Music by day and rock star Jem by night. Marx will be attendance at the 11th annual convention, which takes place at the Holiday Inn Lansdale, meeting and greeting fans and discussing the show during the convention's various panels.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|