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NEWS
August 22, 2011
Monthly Gallery Archive Cartoon
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 1990 | Daily News Wire Services
Marvel Productions will produce cartoons for movie theaters that will be shown the theaters just before Twentieth Century Fox Inc. releases, the two companies said. The studio said Monday that the cartoons, to be called "Fox Toons," should be ready for Fox summer movies in 1991. The studio's deal with Marvel follows a similar effort by Walt Disney Co., which has packaged Roger Rabbit cartoons with "Honey, I Shrunk the Kids" and "Dick Tracy. " The company did not say how many cartoons Marvel will produce.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 1987 | By JOSEPH P. BLAKE, Daily News Staff Writer
Independent television station executives know that the same kids who have to be cajoled into going to bed at a decent hour have no problem waking up at 6 a.m. to watch cartoons. Channel 29 greets the kiddies at 6:30 a.m. with "Fat Albert" and Channel 57 hypnotizes them at the same time with "Inspector Gadget. " Meanwhile, at 7 a.m., Channel 17 airs "Woody Woodpecker. " The stations continue airing cartoons throughout the day - except for a mid-afternoon break for such oldies as "The Munsters" and "Bewitched.
NEWS
November 24, 2002 | By Victoria Donohoe INQUIRER ART CRITIC
Swarthmore College is always surprising us when it comes to art. This month it's happening at McCabe Library with a 30-item solo exhibit featuring Clay Bennett, the 2002 winner of the Pulitzer Prize for editorial cartooning. Bennett produces editorial cartoons five days a week for the Christian Science Monitor, and his consistent ability to turn out very good work is shown by his being a finalist three years in a row before winning the Pulitzer. Born in South Carolina in 1958, the son of a much-traveled career Army officer of rock-ribbed Republican leanings, Clay Bennett had attended 10 schools by the time he graduated from high school in Huntsville, Ala. With his cartooning interests already apparent at the University of North Alabama, where he earned his college degree in art and history in 1980, Bennett was briefly a staff artist at the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette and Fayetteville (N.C.
SPORTS
June 29, 2010
THE NFL IS TEAMING with Nickelodeon on a series of short cartoons that will air during the season. "Rush Zone: Guardians of the Core" will be televised on Nickelodeon's Nicktoons channel and feature coaches and players from all 32 teams with several of them doing voice-overs as themselves. We can see it now: A roly-poly animated figure dressed entirely in black who looks up from a podium and, in a raspy voice, says, "Times yours. " Actually, we don't know if Andy Reid will be involved, but Giants quarterback Eli Manning and Saints coach Sean Payton already have signed on. The cartoons will be 2 to 5 minutes in length and center around a 10-year-old superhero who has the skills of an NFL player.
NEWS
June 8, 1989 | By John Corr, Inquirer Staff Writer Contributing to this report were the Associated Press, USA Today and the Washington Post
Garry Trudeau, who rarely shies from controversy, has withdrawn a series of Doonesbury cartoons about the student protests in China because of last weekend's massacre there. The cartoons, he said, were "predicated on a peaceful resolution" of the protests. But "that was a very bad miscalculation . . . and now obviously (the cartoons are) inappropriate," he said. The cartoons, which were to have run next week, have been withdrawn from all newspapers that carry the strip, including The Inquirer, and will be replaced by a series offering an "obtuse look at the Alaskan oil spill," Trudeau said.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 1993 | By Andy Wickstrom, FOR THE INQUIRER
For cartoon collectors, MGM/UA has provided a bonanza with its "Golden Age of Looney Tunes" series issued on videodisc over the span of two years. The four volumes (each containing five discs) preserve a total of 280 cartoons - enough, if watched on consecutive Saturday mornings, to inspire a yearlong adolescence. But that's not all, folks. At last the Walt Disney Co. has taken the cue and decided to flaunt its cartoon heritage in videodisc form. Next month, it will release Mickey Mouse: The Black & White Years, presenting 34 cartoons from 1928 to 1935.
NEWS
February 27, 2006 | By LINDA S. WALLACE
SO MANY WORDS have already been written and spoken about the Danish newspaper's decision to publish cartoons that set off a wave of protests - peaceful and violent - and riots by Muslims who reacted to what they felt was an affront to the Prophet Mohammad. We've heard from the historians, diplomats, chief executives, newspaper editors, social scientists and economists. I can't offer the learned analysis they did, but I can humbly present a way we might avoid these painful and costly cultural collisions.
NEWS
October 13, 1991 | By Victoria Donohoe, Inquirer Art Critic
Jules Feiffer, our nation's most versatile and unconventional pundit, launched his career by giving away cartoons to build a following. The Village Voice gladly received and began publishing these handouts regularly in 1956 when the Bronx-born Feiffer was 27. Suddenly the success of that new cartoon series, Feiffer, skyrocketed to mass circulation. His best-known comic strip, Feiffer is now syndicated in more than 100 newspapers worldwide, including The Inquirer. And for three decades now, he has been one of America's leading satirists.
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NEWS
May 12, 2015
WE AGAIN find ourselves contending with the aftermath of an attack fueled by abusive cartoons of the Prophet Muhammad, peace be upon him. As an American Muslim, I am both saddened and confused by the frequency with which events like this are taking place around the world. To the Muslims engaging in these acts of violence, I say that we should respond to abusive cartoons by following the example set by the Prophet Muhammad, who repeatedly tolerated abuse and responded with love. To the groups who continue to perpetuate abusive depictions of the Prophet Muhammad, I ask what they intend to gain from their actions.
NEWS
April 8, 2015
ISSUE | HOLY IMAGES Last Supper cartoon leaves a bad taste Shame on The Inquirer for the Signe Wilkinson cartoon it printed on one of Christianity's holiest days (April 2). To use the Last Supper to make a political point on Holy Thursday was tasteless and insulting. Strange that it appeared the same day as the "Inviting bigotry" editorial. |Annemarie Jannotta, Holland ISSUE | SCHOOL MUSIC Skillful measures As an early-childhood music educator at Rosemont School of the Holy Child, I agree wholeheartedly that musical training at a young age enhances brain development and creates a positive impact on lifelong learning ("Tuning up the wiring in young brains," March 30)
NEWS
January 16, 2015
WILL BUNCH informs us ("Free to be - and not be - Charlie"), that he and his colleagues at the Daily News disapprove of the crude humor in Charlie Hebdo , and so will not print the cartoons that led to mass murder in Paris. A month ago, there was perhaps a place for Mr. Bunch's nuanced editorial judgments about what is, and what is not, proper. Now, however, the cartoons are at the heart of the biggest news story in the world and you are a newspaper. How can you not publish them?
NEWS
January 9, 2015
TODAY, I was going to introduce you to an investigative reporter from Kenya who received threats on her life. Her government did not step in to protect her because it was the government that was threatening her. The United States gave her asylum. The attack on Charlie Hebdo , which is an attack on Western values, gave her story an immediacy, so I called her Wednesday and she agreed to talk to me. Yesterday morning she called, very apologetic, to cancel. "As a journalist I hate doing this," she said, "but Homeland Security thought it would not be safe.
NEWS
January 9, 2015 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
Wednesday's shocking terror attack on the French satirical journal Charlie Hebdo should finally awaken Western publics to the threat posed by radical Islamists to free speech worldwide. That threat may seem obvious when 10 journalists from a newspaper that published caricatures of the prophet Muhammad are murdered by masked men with Kalashnikovs shouting " Allahu Akbar . " Yet these assassinations follow a rising number of death threats and violent protests by Islamic fundamentalists against Western books, films, or newspapers they deem offensive.
NEWS
January 9, 2015
YESTERDAY I LOST four brothers - none of whom I'd ever met. Stephane Charbonnie; Jean Cabut, a/k/a "Cabu"; Georges Wolinski; and Bernard Verlhac, a/k/a "Tignous," were the cartoonists assassinated along with their journalism colleagues at the French satire magazine, Charlie Hebdo . "Charlie" was named after Charlie Brown, but it is related more closely to The Onion or Mad magazine than the Peanuts comic strip. It certainly could not be confused with straight newspapers, like the New York Times . But, when it came time to defend free speech after the infamous Danish cartoons about Muhammad were published in 2005, Charlie Hebdo ran the cartoons, while the New York Times refrained, primly telling readers that they were essentially "gratuitous assaults.
NEWS
December 12, 2014 | BY MORGAN ZALOT, Daily News Staff Writer zalotm@phillynews.com, 215-854-5928
AN EDITORIAL cartoon depicting children asking Santa Claus, "Keep us safe from the police," published in a Bucks County newspaper on Sunday has drawn the ire of the Fraternal Order of Police. In a scathing letter yesterday, Philadelphia FOP Lodge 5 president John McNesby demanded an apology from the Bucks County Courier Times for the cartoon. "Surprisingly, you have at least one reader of that excuse for a newspaper you run," McNesby wrote. "The one reader forwarded a copy of your disgraceful and highly offensive 'cartoon.' " He went on to write that the newspaper owed an apology to every law-enforcement officer and their families for the cartoon.
NEWS
November 17, 2014
Daily Signe Cartoon 11/17/14
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