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ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 2013 | By Patricia Mans, For The Inquirer
Brandon is an active, caring, and creative 8-year-old who loves to play outdoors. His favorite indoor activity is drawing, and he delights in using markers for his artwork. Brandon also enjoys watching cartoons and riding horses. He thinks he would like to have a horse some day. In school, Brandon receives special-education services and benefits from small class size and individual attention. He gets along well with his classmates and teachers, who say he is a pleasure to have in the classroom.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 5, 2013 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
Janice Adams Hall was 13 when she discovered Betty Boop, the cutesy cartoon character who charmed American audiences in the 1930s and went on to become a powerhouse brand. "I love her. She is bee-yoo-dee-full , just like me," says Hall, now 52 and so besotted with Betty, as the doll-faced character is known to fans, that her West Mount Airy home is practically wall-to-wall Boopabilia. In the dining room, Betty cartoons run in a continuous loop on a wide-screen TV. Her image is on the walls, her statuettes on the table, her tchotchkes in the china cabinets.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 2013 | By Molly Eichel
SPRING IS IN THE AIR! The weather is warmer, the sun is out later, people are starting to become tolerable again and the Phillies are all over your TV screen. Except they aren't playing baseball for real just yet. First up is Phillies shortstop Jimmy Rollins , who will cameo on the Fox cartoon "The Cleveland Show," a "Family Guy" spin-off, next Sunday in an episode titled "California Dreamin' (All the Cleves are Brown). " Rollins isn't the only famous face appearing on the baseball-themed (duh)
NEWS
February 22, 2013 | By Karie Simmons, Inquirer Staff Writer
U.S. Sen. Bob Casey asked about 600 Philadelphia middle school students Wednesday to raise a hand if they had ever seen a Phillies game. Nearly everyone in the auditorium did. He noted that a packed Citizens Bank Park holds about 44,000 people, then asked the students to imagine an additional 16,000, for 60,000. That, he said, is the number of U.S. students each day who stay out of school because they are being bullied. "Now that's a big crowd," he said. Casey (D., Pa.)
ENTERTAINMENT
December 25, 2012 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
A version of this review appeared in Sunday's Arts + Entertainment section. Neck-deep into Quentin Tarantino's antebellum western Django Unchained , I had this mental image of the ├╝ber-geek genre filmmaker tapping furiously on his laptop, beaming at the brilliance of every new piece of dialogue he's writ. For all I know, Tarantino works on a typewriter, or longhand on a legal pad (or dictates his copy to a Gal Friday in spike heels), but in any event, as the banter ping-ponged across the dining table in the plantation mansion of slave-master Calvin Candie (Leonardo DiCaprio, twirling his mustache)
TRAVEL
December 23, 2012
10 for the Road Connecticut. Catch the Holiday Model Train Display at the Connecticut Cellar Savers Fire Museum. The display is open Saturdays and Sundays through Jan. 13. View antique trains, participate in a museum scavenger hunt, and have a chance to operate some train accessories on seven operating layouts. 634 Main St., Portland. Free. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. www.ctcellarsavers.org Delaware. Family Concert: A Musical Storybook is Jan. 13 at 3 p.m. at Wilmington Music School, 4101 N Washington St., Wilmington.
NEWS
November 10, 2012
Ultimate feminist Larry Eichel gives a fairly good, comprehensive review of Backwards in High Heels , with the exception of his opening remarks, in which he asserts that author Thomas J. Carty overestimates Faith Whittlesey when he compares her to Hillary Clinton, Eleanor Roosevelt, and Nancy Pelosi. What Eichel does not acknowledge - and what makes Carty's assertion reasonable and Whittlesey's rise to prominence the more remarkable - is the fact that she did not have a powerful or wealthy husband standing behind her as did Clinton, Roosevelt, and Pelosi.
NEWS
October 8, 2012
John Rovick, 93, the beloved host of a children's show in Los Angeles throughout the 1950s and '60s, died Saturday in Boise, Idaho, after a brief illness, his former station, KTTV-TV, told the Associated Press. For nearly two decades, Mr. Rovick appeared on the daily Cartoon Time show that earned him an Emmy Award for outstanding children's program. It was so popular that KTTV said it added another Rovick show, Sheriff John's Lunch Brigade , that stayed on the air until 1970.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 28, 2012 | By Jim Rutter, For The Inquirer
If Batman, Thor, and the Avengers have proved anything artistic while raking in box office billions, it's that Hollywood actors can get away with cartoonish acting when playing comic-book characters. Not so on the stage, where even comic thrillers demand credible villainy. Which makes it such a delight that Robert Smythe - who for more than two decades infused humanity into the puppets he created at Mum Puppettheatre - imparts immense gravity and complexity to the murderous lead character in Hedgerow's production of Ira Levin's 1978 thriller, Deathtrap . Here, Smythe plays struggling playwright Sidney Bruhl.
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