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BUSINESS
April 1, 2012 | Reid Kanaley
What's more unfashionable than paying in cash? Not much. But the advantages in many situations outweigh the hassle of counting your change. Not for convenience. In an age when some banks let you pick your own photo or logo to put on your credit card, some people see using cash as a throwback, says this article at Investopedia.com. Indeed, it says, the convenience of plastic is not what you're after when you choose to use green-backs. Still, if overspending is your problem, paying cash is one of the few ways to to finish a month without having increased your debt load.
NEWS
May 28, 2012 | By George Anastasia, Inquirer Staff Writer
The cash was bundled in rubber bands and stuffed in two plastic bags found in the backpack of a 75-year-old man who dropped dead after stepping off a train in Manhattan's busy Pennsylvania Station one day last summer. Ten months later, authorities are still trying to unravel the mystery of the money - $179,980 - and the hapless courier, one William "Billy" Coyman, a retired Teamster with a checkered criminal past that included ties to the mob and the drug underworld. Federal authorities, who have seized the cash, are not saying much about the case.
NEWS
July 19, 2014 | By Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - Republicans are routing Democrats when it comes to raising money in the four most competitive House races in the Philadelphia region. The Republicans in those contests have more than three times as much cash on hand as the Democrats: $5.36 million to $1.64 million as of June 30, according to campaign filings released this week. In three of the four races, the Republican candidates raised at least twice as much in the latest reporting period as their Democratic rivals.
NEWS
May 11, 2013 | By Colleen Long, Associated Press
NEW YORK - A gang of cyber-criminals stole $45 million in a matter of hours by hacking their way into a database of prepaid debit cards and then fanning out around the globe to drain cash machines, federal prosecutors said Thursday. Brooklyn U.S. Attorney Loretta Lynch called it "a massive 21st-century bank heist" and compared its size to the Lufthansa heist in the late 1970s immortalized in the film Goodfellas . Lynch said the fraudsters had moved with astounding speed to loot financial institutions around the world.
BUSINESS
November 18, 2011 | By Bernard Condon, Associated Press
NEW YORK - Hardly a day goes by without some politician or pundit pointing out that companies are hoarding cash - roughly $3 trillion of it. If only they would spend it, the thinking goes, the economy might get better. But the story is not as simple as that. Although it seems to have escaped nearly everyone's notice, companies have piled up even more debt lately than they have cash. Financial experts say it makes companies more vulnerable than they look. "The record cash story is bull-market baloney," says David Stockman, a former U.S. budget director.
NEWS
March 6, 2012 | By Peter Mucha, Inquirer Staff Writer
The biggest cash prize in U.S. lottery history was awarded today to Louisa White, 81, of Newport, R.I. The advertised annuity - $336.4 million - was staggering, but not a record-setter. Five annuities were bigger, including two in Powerball. But the $210 million cash prize beats all the competition, topping a record set in March 2011 by a New York winner in Mega Millions. Mega Millions has produced two bigger cash jackpots, but each was split. The corresponding cash has been higher in recent years because of low interest rates.
BUSINESS
June 9, 2013
After reading about the cash hoards being amassed by Apple Inc. and some other U.S. corporations, I spent some time perusing the balance sheets of the Philly 50. I'd naturally assumed that Comcast Corp., the region's most valuable company, would have the biggest amount of cash and cash equivalents as of March 31. And naturally, I was wrong. DuPont Co. was sitting on $6.58 billion in cash at the end of the first quarter, up $2.27 billion from the end of 2012. Comcast reported cash of $1.84 billion as of March 31, down $9.11 billion from the end of the year.
NEWS
August 16, 2012
Powerball's already giant jackpot just got richer, enough to leapfrog the old cash record, set this year. The new fortune up for grabs Wednesday: $320 million for the annuity (up $15 million from Monday), $213.3 for the cash (up $10 million). The only larger Powerball annuity in the last six years was $336.4 million in February. A Rhode Island woman who had the single winning ticket instead took the game's new record for cash: $210 million. Less taxes, of course. If this one rolls over, expect a new Powerball record, possibly shattering the $365 million annuity hit by eight Nebraska food-plant workers in February 2006.
NEWS
August 15, 2012 | By Peter Mucha, Inquirer Staff Writer
Powerball's already giant jackpot just got richer, enough to leapfrog the old cash record, just set in this year. The new fortune up for grabs on Wednesday night: $320 million for the annuity (up $15 million from Monday), $213.3 for the cash (up $10 million). Not because of a drawing. Because of soaring sales. It also helps that the competition, Mega Millions, is offering a relatively puny $36 million, $27 million cash, for tonight's drawing. The only larger Powerball annuity in the last six years was $336.4 million in February.
NEWS
March 14, 2011 | Inquirer Staff Report
Police are investigating a home invasion robbery in Mayfair today during which the thieves made off with cash, a diamond tennis bracelet and a pistol. Police said a 31-year-old man opened the door to his home about 10:20 a.m. to find an acquaintance who apparently had been beaten accompanied by three other men who were masked and armed. The homeowner's 4-year-old daughter and 11-month-old son also were in the house on the 3400 block of Friendship Street in Mayfair, police said.
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NEWS
August 5, 2016
Mayor Kenney's campaign to pass a tax on sweetened beverages hinged on his proposal to spend $91 million annually to expand prekindergarten programs. But $300 million will be used to secure bonds to upgrade libraries, recreation centers, and other facilities, so the public must focus on how that money will be spent. Tough decisions on which facilities should be improved and which ones are too dilapidated or underused to save must be made. Those decisions should be devoid of the political considerations that can crop up when City Council members exercise their "prerogative" in development cases.
BUSINESS
July 30, 2016 | By Harold Brubaker, Staff Writer
The Barnes Foundation has been booked this week with a string of parties related to the Democratic National Convention. "Normally, July private events are few, so this is a tremendous increase in activity," Barnes spokeswoman Deirdre Maher said. Hotels were nearly full, streets around the Pennsylvania Convention Center and City Hall bustled with pedestrians, and some restaurants were booked by out-of-towners for the entire week. Does this mean that the convention, which brought an estimated 50,000 people to Philadelphia - about the same as for the annual Army-Navy football game - was an economic boon for the region?
SPORTS
July 26, 2016 | By Ed Barkowitz, STAFF WRITER
WITH A LITTLE help from her favorite team, loyal reader Inez Gale has pulled off an epic hat trick. Gale hit the Daily News jackpot for the third time Sunday when Odubel Herrera homered to lead off the sixth. It was our Home Run Payoff inning and the blast was worth $1,000 for Gale, who is 88. It was the third time Gale won a thousand bucks from us. She also won in 2010 at the age of 82 and 2013 at 85. "I get the Daily News every day and fill out the coupon all the time," she said.
NEWS
July 26, 2016 | By Jim Rutter, For The Inquirer
Imagine that two decades from now, some Broadway producer penning a jukebox musical about the music of Nirvana used Kurt Cobain's songs to depict a happy family life in the Pacific Northwest. That approach would be no less an insult to Nirvana fans than Ring of Fire , William Meade and Richard Maltby's show now playing at People's Light, is to the oeuvre of Johnny Cash. The show doesn't so much sanitize Cash's music as bastardize it. Maltby and Meade's concept employs three couples, one young (Nyssa Duchow and Sam Sherwood)
NEWS
July 20, 2016 | By Emily Babay, STAFF WRITER
A Pennsylvania lottery player won $1 million in this weekend's Powerball drawing. A ticket sold in the state matched all five white balls drawn Saturday: 11, 17, 40, 50 and 62. But the ticket missed the Powerball of 26, falling short of the $333 million jackpot. No one hit the top prize, so the jackpot for Wednesday's drawing rises to $361 million for the annuity, or $250.3 million cash. Pennsylvania's $1 million winner was sold in Lehigh County, at the Weis Markets located at 5020 Route 873 in Schnecksville.
NEWS
July 3, 2016 | By Julie Appleby, KAISER HEALTH NEWS
Some consumers who use health insurance copays to buy prescription drugs are paying far more than they should be and would be better off paying with cash, especially for generics. The added cost runs as high as $30 or more a prescription, say pharmacists, and the profit is largely being pocketed by middlemen who collect the added money from local pharmacies. Cash prices started to dip below copays a decade ago when several big box stores started offering dozens of generics for as little as $4 a prescription.
NEWS
June 25, 2016 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Staff Writer
He is past president of the National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers, and during a career of more than 40 years has represented accused killers Ira Einhorn, Amanda Knox, and Robert Durst. But on Thursday, Center City lawyer Theodore Simon, 65, was in a Philadelphia courtroom as the accuser. The case was Commonwealth v. Rico Clark - the defendant being a 27-year-old Norristown man accused of picking a rubber-banded wad of cash from the pocket of Simon's suit jacket and leading him on a foot chase that ended with Clark's arrest several blocks away.
NEWS
June 20, 2016
With so much attention on the sugary and non-sugary beverage tax that City Council finally passed Thursday following weeks of debate and a game-saving, last-minute reduction in the levy, little was said about Mayor Kenney's overall $4.2 billion budget being a whopping $192 million bigger than the current spending plan. The 1.5-cents-per-ounce beverage tax will generate about $91 million a year initially, until soda consumption predictably goes down. But that money is designated for specific expenditures, including a program to increase the number of "high-quality" prekindergarten slots in the city.
NEWS
June 16, 2016
ISSUE | SODA TAX Kenney's sleight of hand Mayor Kenney was very clever about the sugary-beverage tax ("New soda tax plan: 11/2 cents," Thursday). First, more than half of its revenue was earmarked for prekindergarten. What politician would go on record opposing that? Second, it was to be a tax on sugary drinks, so it could be an inducement to improved health. Now the tax will be levied on diet drinks as well. Third, since the tax will be charged to distributors, consumers and store owners would be spared.
NEWS
May 26, 2016
S. Jersey man convicted in fatal stabbing of witness A 63-year-old South Jersey man was convicted Tuesday of murder in the December 2012 fatal stabbing of a 54-year-old Gloucester County woman who had testified against him in a murder trial. Richard Santiago was convicted by a jury of first-degree murder and related offenses, the Gloucester County Prosecutor's Office said in a news release. Ramona Johnstone testified against Santiago at his 2006 trial for the 2004 killing of Johnstone's boyfriend, Richard King of Mantua.
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