FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
April 1, 2012 | Reid Kanaley
What's more unfashionable than paying in cash? Not much. But the advantages in many situations outweigh the hassle of counting your change. Not for convenience. In an age when some banks let you pick your own photo or logo to put on your credit card, some people see using cash as a throwback, says this article at Investopedia.com. Indeed, it says, the convenience of plastic is not what you're after when you choose to use green-backs. Still, if overspending is your problem, paying cash is one of the few ways to to finish a month without having increased your debt load.
NEWS
May 28, 2012 | By George Anastasia, Inquirer Staff Writer
The cash was bundled in rubber bands and stuffed in two plastic bags found in the backpack of a 75-year-old man who dropped dead after stepping off a train in Manhattan's busy Pennsylvania Station one day last summer. Ten months later, authorities are still trying to unravel the mystery of the money - $179,980 - and the hapless courier, one William "Billy" Coyman, a retired Teamster with a checkered criminal past that included ties to the mob and the drug underworld. Federal authorities, who have seized the cash, are not saying much about the case.
NEWS
July 19, 2014 | By Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - Republicans are routing Democrats when it comes to raising money in the four most competitive House races in the Philadelphia region. The Republicans in those contests have more than three times as much cash on hand as the Democrats: $5.36 million to $1.64 million as of June 30, according to campaign filings released this week. In three of the four races, the Republican candidates raised at least twice as much in the latest reporting period as their Democratic rivals.
NEWS
May 11, 2013 | By Colleen Long, Associated Press
NEW YORK - A gang of cyber-criminals stole $45 million in a matter of hours by hacking their way into a database of prepaid debit cards and then fanning out around the globe to drain cash machines, federal prosecutors said Thursday. Brooklyn U.S. Attorney Loretta Lynch called it "a massive 21st-century bank heist" and compared its size to the Lufthansa heist in the late 1970s immortalized in the film Goodfellas . Lynch said the fraudsters had moved with astounding speed to loot financial institutions around the world.
NEWS
March 6, 2012 | By Peter Mucha, Inquirer Staff Writer
The biggest cash prize in U.S. lottery history was awarded today to Louisa White, 81, of Newport, R.I. The advertised annuity - $336.4 million - was staggering, but not a record-setter. Five annuities were bigger, including two in Powerball. But the $210 million cash prize beats all the competition, topping a record set in March 2011 by a New York winner in Mega Millions. Mega Millions has produced two bigger cash jackpots, but each was split. The corresponding cash has been higher in recent years because of low interest rates.
BUSINESS
June 9, 2013
After reading about the cash hoards being amassed by Apple Inc. and some other U.S. corporations, I spent some time perusing the balance sheets of the Philly 50. I'd naturally assumed that Comcast Corp., the region's most valuable company, would have the biggest amount of cash and cash equivalents as of March 31. And naturally, I was wrong. DuPont Co. was sitting on $6.58 billion in cash at the end of the first quarter, up $2.27 billion from the end of 2012. Comcast reported cash of $1.84 billion as of March 31, down $9.11 billion from the end of the year.
NEWS
August 16, 2012
Powerball's already giant jackpot just got richer, enough to leapfrog the old cash record, set this year. The new fortune up for grabs Wednesday: $320 million for the annuity (up $15 million from Monday), $213.3 for the cash (up $10 million). The only larger Powerball annuity in the last six years was $336.4 million in February. A Rhode Island woman who had the single winning ticket instead took the game's new record for cash: $210 million. Less taxes, of course. If this one rolls over, expect a new Powerball record, possibly shattering the $365 million annuity hit by eight Nebraska food-plant workers in February 2006.
NEWS
July 16, 2013
CAMDEN - Thieves broke into PNC bank machines in the 100 block of North Broadway Saturday night and stole an undisclosed amount of cash, police said. Authorities responding to a report of smoke coming from the building around 11 p.m. discovered that the ATMs had been tampered with. Police said witnesses reported seeing two black males loading the machines' contents into a black Honda Accord and speeding away. "This was not an act of smash and grab, rather a sophisticated burglary that seemed well-planned utilizing unconventional tools to gain entry into the building and the ATM machines," said Camden County Chief Scott Thomson.
NEWS
August 15, 2012 | By Peter Mucha, Inquirer Staff Writer
Powerball's already giant jackpot just got richer, enough to leapfrog the old cash record, just set in this year. The new fortune up for grabs on Wednesday night: $320 million for the annuity (up $15 million from Monday), $213.3 for the cash (up $10 million). Not because of a drawing. Because of soaring sales. It also helps that the competition, Mega Millions, is offering a relatively puny $36 million, $27 million cash, for tonight's drawing. The only larger Powerball annuity in the last six years was $336.4 million in February.
NEWS
March 14, 2011 | Inquirer Staff Report
Police are investigating a home invasion robbery in Mayfair today during which the thieves made off with cash, a diamond tennis bracelet and a pistol. Police said a 31-year-old man opened the door to his home about 10:20 a.m. to find an acquaintance who apparently had been beaten accompanied by three other men who were masked and armed. The homeowner's 4-year-old daughter and 11-month-old son also were in the house on the 3400 block of Friendship Street in Mayfair, police said.
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NEWS
July 22, 2015
ISSUE | FORFEITURES Seize criminals' property only I join in applauding District Attorney Seth Williams for stopping his office's practice of using the commonwealth's forfeiture laws to take homes and cars from people who have never been accused, much less convicted, of a crime ("Dirty money," July 6). However, these changes do not go far enough. According to a recent American Civil Liberties Union report, Williams' office takes $1 million in cash annually from Philadelphians who have never been found guilty of a crime.
NEWS
June 21, 2015 | By Jason Laughlin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Money helped, but it did not guarantee wins in the Pennsylvania Supreme Court race. At $1.5 million, Philadelphia Common Pleas Court Judge Kevin Dougherty was the top fund-raiser in the 12-way campaign, according to financial documents made public Thursday. And while the Democrat did win nomination in the May 19 primary, correlations between cash and votes were hard to find. Jefferson County Court Judge John Foradora, with $712,805 - about $6 for each vote cast for him - had the second-biggest money pot, but the Republican lost.
NEWS
June 12, 2015 | By Maria Panaritis, Inquirer Staff Writer
Efforts to replace a crumbling mural of famous South Philadelphia musicians gained momentum Wednesday when officials learned that Frankie Avalon had pledged money to help find a new home for the endangered creation. The $5,000 donation from the crooner and movie star added to $5,000 committed earlier in the week by longtime disc jockey Jerry Blavat in an effort to raise an estimated $80,000 for the project, said Jane Golden, founder and chief of the Mural Arts Program. Also this week, officials identified two potential locations on South Broad Street for the replacement mural.
NEWS
June 3, 2015 | By Stu Bykofsky, Daily News Columnist
ANTOINETTE LEVITT wants you to stop and smell the roses, but the roses are in bad shape. We are standing in the Rose Garden, a hidden gem owned by the National Park Service, starved for the nourishment of proper funding. The one-acre oasis, hidden between Walnut and Locust, and 4th and 5th streets, was bone dry when Levitt led me there on a recent afternoon. Levitt is the regent (president) of the local chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution, which in 1971 planted the Rose Garden in ground owned by the National Park Service, with the understanding the park service would maintain it. Guess what?
SPORTS
May 19, 2015 | By Zach Berman, Inquirer Staff Writer
The team that could not score from the 1-yard line two times with the 49ers game on the line in September wants all two-point conversions to be from that distance. And it just so happens that the Eagles could have a roster this year that is better equipped to make those plays. NFL owners will consider three proposals to change the extra point this week at the league meetings in San Francisco. One is from the Eagles, who are proposing to move extra points from the 2-yard line to the 15-yard line, two-point conversions from the 2-yard line to the 1, and for defenses to be allowed to return a turnover for two points on the play.
BUSINESS
May 5, 2015 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pennsylvania developers, hugely profitable corporations, colleges, towns, and hospitals have applications pending for $1 billion in matching taxpayer funds from the Redevelopment Assistance Capital Program (RACP). You didn't get yours in? Gov. Wolf last week agreed to take new requests from Monday to May 18. Last year, the state collected $1.1 billion in RACP applications, and funded just $207 million. The money, put up by taxpayers through state bonds, is supposed to support projects that create jobs.
NEWS
April 22, 2015 | By Melanie Burney, Inquirer Staff Writer
A bookkeeper at an Atlantic City rolling chair company has admitted keeping a second set of books to cover up unreported cash siphoned from the business, U.S. Attorney Paul J. Fishman announced Monday. Abdus Mian, 66, of Atlantic City, pleaded guilty before U.S. District Judge Joseph H. Rodriguez to one count of making materially false statements to federal agents. Mian was the bookkeeper for Royal Rolling Chairs L.L.C., which operated on the Boardwalk, according to documents and statements in court.
SPORTS
April 17, 2015 | Jake Kaplan, Inquirer Staff Writer
NEW YORK - Phillies manager Ryne Sandberg said he will decide "a series at a time" whether Ryan Howard is in his lineup against lefthanded pitchers. The only two games the struggling first baseman has not started were against southpaws. As he did Friday against Washington's Gio Gonzalez, Darin Ruf started in Howard's place Wednesday against Mets lefthander Jonathon Niese. Rightfielder Jeff Francoeur occupied Howard's cleanup spot. In 27 at-bats entering the game, Howard had just four hits (.148)
NEWS
April 16, 2015 | By Mike Newall, Inquirer Columnist
In Philly, we don't pick judges based on skill. That's not the way. The process has little to do with merit. It's all about the chance of a lucky ballot spot, and the sway of money and politics. The judicial kingmakers - the Democratic City Committee, the power brokers, the vote-wielding ward leaders - aren't sweating over quality, credentials, and experience. Hey, if you've got some brains, it probably won't hurt you. But if you don't, it's not going to count against you either.
NEWS
April 13, 2015 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
THE WOMAN who managed money seized from criminals in Delaware County now has a criminal record herself after allegedly stealing the illicit funds to, among other things, buy her way into Flyers games that she later bragged about on Facebook. Mary Lynch, 48, was charged yesterday with theft, receiving stolen property, forgery, identity theft and related offenses after allegedly embezzling more than $100,000 in drug forfeiture funds while working as a financial administrator at the D.A.'s Office, officials said.
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