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Cash Cow

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NEWS
August 3, 1989 | By Marjorie Keen, Special to The Inquirer
Chester County dairy farmers could see an average profit of $75,000 a year, a nationally known Holstein breeder said last week. David Burket of Blair County spoke at the county Holstein Club's field day at Wilonna Holsteins, the farm of William and Donna Stoltzfus, in West Fallowfield Township. The average area dairy farm represents an investment of $750,000 or more, Burket said. "You ought to make 10 percent on your investment with little work," he told farmers. "I think a pure-bred breeder must produce more than just milk.
NEWS
November 22, 1991 | By Walter F. Roche Jr., Inquirer Staff Writer
A confidential federal report has concluded that the HealthPass program has generated "vast sums of money" for the company running the program and is in "imminent danger" of becoming a "cash cow. " In a highly critical report, G.A. Rafalko, the regional inspector general for audits in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, concludes that the HealthPass management firm, Healthcare Management Alternatives, had net earnings of $16.6 million...
NEWS
October 9, 1989 | By DAN ROTTENBERG
In retrospect, Mayor Goode was right about the Eagles. In a recent column, I mentioned in passing that Goode was right - and critics like me were dead wrong - when he dropped everything in 1984 to induce the Philadelphia Eagles not to move to Phoenix. That episode deserves a follow-up, if only for its encouraging lesson: Contrary to popular belief, sometimes Goode really knows what he's doing. As you may recall, in December 1984 Goode turned his attention from a waste disposal crisis and a SEPTA bridge crisis to attend to the personal crisis of Eagles owner Leonard Tose, a private citizen who didn't even live in the city.
NEWS
September 14, 2005 | By Mario F. Cattabiani and Angela Couloumbis INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
Pedro Martinez Cruz milks cows for a living. He works 60 hours a week, takes home about $8 an hour, and sends every last dime he can spare back to his wife in Chiapas, Mexico. The 43-year-old, who lives in Lancaster, is at work by 6 a.m. and doesn't get home until 12 hours later. It's a hard job, he said, but he's gotten used to it. "Esta bien," he said yesterday with a shrug of his shoulders, indicating in Spanish that all was good. Still, Cruz's daily dairy reality is a far cry from the lucrative income that House Speaker John M. Perzel is making it out to be. The Philadelphia Republican is drawing fire - and ire - for what many are calling inaccurate and insensitive comments he made about milkers at a gathering of the Republican State Committee in Harrisburg on Saturday.
NEWS
May 3, 1992 | By Jodi Enda, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
What New Jersey voters can't do with their ballots, they do with their checkbooks, throwing their weight behind one presidential contender or another. Despite the state's late primary June 2, New Jersey residents wield a considerable amount of influence in the selection of presidential nominees by giving large chunks of money to Republican and Democratic candidates, campaign officials say. The state is a cash cow. Consider that New Jersey residents have contributed twice as much money to Democratic front runner Bill Clinton as have Pennsylvanians, who greatly outnumber them in the Democratic Party and in the population.
NEWS
November 15, 1994 | By Walter F. Naedele, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Nelson Stoltzfus was a Chester County dairy farmer for 27 years. In 1991, he gave it up. Sold the milk cows, sold the farm machinery. Kept the farm, rented the fields to another farmer. He used to put no more than 5,000 miles a year on the family car. Now, he said, he drives 35,000 miles a year for a company that sells barn equipment. "Like I heard a fellow say, the (milk) prices we were getting were 1960 prices, but we were paying 1990 prices" for machinery, feed and such, he said.
NEWS
April 15, 2009
SINCE Mayor Nutter has become a professional debt collector, he may want to go on Mapquest and get directions to One NovaCare Way. The Eagles still owed the city $8 million-plus, not to mention the money still owed to local contractors who helped build their cash cow. That money would let the contractors bid on work throughout the city. He may also want to talk to his city controller regarding a recent letter he received about sites widely believed to be employing nontaxpaying workers.
NEWS
September 11, 1996 | by Nicole Weisensee, Daily News Staff Writer
A recently retired Bucks County policeman was accused yesterday of illegal farming - milking a cash cow and skimming $45,000 in cream for himself. Ex-Warminster Township Officer Vincent J. O'Neill, former treasurer of the township's police union, was to be arraigned today on charges that he stole more than $45,000 from the Police Benevolent Association. The motive, said District Attorney Alan M. Rubenstein, was "pure unadulterated greed. " "He was ripping off his own colleagues and brethren in the police department," Rubenstein said.
BUSINESS
May 17, 1986 | By MARC MELTZER, Daily News Staff Writer
The chief executive of Bell Atlantic yesterday called for more freedom to offer long distance, manufacture equipment and provide computer services because "the public deserves no less. " But the public may get stuck with spending more than it deserves on local phone service from such a move, said Pennsylvania Consumer Advocate David Barasch. In remarks delivered yesterday to the Maryland Chamber of Commerce, Bell Atlantic's Thomas Bolger said the company wants regulatory restraints removed.
NEWS
March 20, 1997
For a city that's been hemorrhaging jobs at the frightening rate of nearly 1,000 a month, it's good news to hear that Philadelphia held its own in 1996. Even better news was hinted at by the latest U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics numbers: With restructuring slowing in health care, a key sector of the local economy - and barring unforeseen disasters - 1997 could be just as good. And Philadelphia's good showing didn't come at the expense of the region. The eight suburban counties around Philadelphia and in South Jersey added 28,000 jobs, to give the region an overall employment growth rate of 1.3 percent.
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BUSINESS
December 17, 2015 | By Jonathan Takiff, Staff Writer
Nothing else gets Janet Page into the holiday spirit like a visit to the Kimmel Center for a Christmas concert with the Philly Pops. "It's so pretty and festive," the boomer show-goer said. "And the Philly Pops program is grand. " A hop-skip away at the Academy of Music, Barbara Edelstein was shepherding granddaughter Audrey Melnick, 12, plus pal Samantha Woolworth, on their seventh annual visit to the Pennsylvania Ballet's performance of The Nutcracker . "I never get tired of the dancing," Melnick said.
NEWS
November 25, 2012
Two Judges, Thousands of Children, and a $2.8 Million Kickback Scheme By William Ecenbarger New Press. 272 pp. $26.95 Reviewed by David W. Marston Zero tolerance. That was Judge Mark A. Ciavarella's rigid formula for dealing with even trivial juvenile misconduct, and the tough boss of "kiddie court" made sure everyone in Scranton knew it. But almost no one - except Ciavarella's coconspirator, President Judge Michael T. Conahan - knew that zero tolerance was also the secret ingredient fueling a lucrative kickback scheme that paid millions to the corrupt judges.
NEWS
October 12, 2012 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer
WHILE WE JOKINGLY wonder why people in haunted movie houses don't leave, we know we really don't want them to go. Not the viewers and certainly not Hollywood, which would be nowhere without haunted houses, as it makes most of its easy money in the horror arena. With that in mind, the industry has been looking for a bankable new franchise since the decline of the "Saw" series and the diminishing returns of the "Paranormal Activity. " It may have found a successor in "Sinister," a thoroughly familiar but slick and effective horror movie starring Ethan Hawke as Ellison Oswald, a true-crime writer who moves into the home where a horrible murder occurred.
SPORTS
June 19, 2012 | By William Bender and Daily News Staff Writer
REMEMBER Tim Donaghy? Delco native. Ex-referee in the NBA. Recovering gambling addict. Felon. Yeah, that guy. A Florida jury wants to make him a millionaire. After 5 rough years that included banishment from the NBA, gambling and wire-fraud convictions for betting on basketball games, and even 2 weeks spent in solitary confinement "like Charles Manson" while serving a 15-month prison term, Donaghy can finally put one in the win column. According to Donaghy and his lawyer, a St. Petersburg jury on Friday awarded Donaghy $1.3 million in his civil suit against Shawna Vercher and her now-defunct company VTi Group, which published Donaghy's tell-all book about the NBA and its referees.
NEWS
June 4, 2012 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
You are so busted. You are in Cherry Hill driving a blue pickup truck in the left lane of Springdale Road where it crosses Route 70, and you are blowing through the intersection a second after the traffic light turned red. Township police just got a nice video of your truck, as well as some close-up photos, and you will soon receive a notice in the mail demanding $85 for your haste. Congratulations. You are part of a booming cohort in South Jersey: motorists caught by red-light cameras at nine intersections in six municipalities in Camden and Gloucester Counties.
NEWS
June 25, 2010
State Sen. Anthony Williams set a record by getting three individuals to each contribute more than $1 million to his failed bid in this year's Democratic primary for governor. The extraordinary largesse raised eyebrows, even for a state with no campaign-giving limits and a governor who has raised millions over the years from firms and individuals who have profited off government contracts. The three Williams donors have refused to speak about their motives, but were said to support his stance on school choice, and in particular vouchers.
NEWS
June 3, 2010 | By Craig R. McCoy and Miriam Hill, Inquirer Staff Writers
Once, it was banking millions of dollars and was a key redoubt in the power base of former State Sen. Vincent J. Fumo - and a supporter of his luxuriant lifestyle. Today, it has only about $80,000 in the bank, its board of Fumo cronies has been cast out, and the former senator is nine months into a 55-month federal prison term. But the nonprofit Citizens' Alliance for Better Neighborhoods, which Fumo founded, can still do good for a commercial swath of South Philadelphia, its interim overseer recommended Wednesday.
NEWS
April 15, 2009
SINCE Mayor Nutter has become a professional debt collector, he may want to go on Mapquest and get directions to One NovaCare Way. The Eagles still owed the city $8 million-plus, not to mention the money still owed to local contractors who helped build their cash cow. That money would let the contractors bid on work throughout the city. He may also want to talk to his city controller regarding a recent letter he received about sites widely believed to be employing nontaxpaying workers.
NEWS
December 8, 2005 | By Mari A. Schaefer INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When Falls Township set out last year to update the contract it has with the company that operates the giant landfill in the township, officials decided for the first time to enlist the help of an outside law firm. What the township ended up with, according to one of its attorneys, was the "largest, nonpublic-works contract ever negotiated in Pennsylvania. " The $250 million the township will collect during a 20-year period will not produce gift checks like those that Tullytown residents receive from a landfill there.
NEWS
September 14, 2005 | By Mario F. Cattabiani and Angela Couloumbis INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
Pedro Martinez Cruz milks cows for a living. He works 60 hours a week, takes home about $8 an hour, and sends every last dime he can spare back to his wife in Chiapas, Mexico. The 43-year-old, who lives in Lancaster, is at work by 6 a.m. and doesn't get home until 12 hours later. It's a hard job, he said, but he's gotten used to it. "Esta bien," he said yesterday with a shrug of his shoulders, indicating in Spanish that all was good. Still, Cruz's daily dairy reality is a far cry from the lucrative income that House Speaker John M. Perzel is making it out to be. The Philadelphia Republican is drawing fire - and ire - for what many are calling inaccurate and insensitive comments he made about milkers at a gathering of the Republican State Committee in Harrisburg on Saturday.
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