CollectionsCash Flow
IN THE NEWS

Cash Flow

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
November 5, 1993 | By Michael L. Rozansky and Andrew Maykuth, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Comcast Corp., the Philadelphia cable-television and cellular-phone company, said third-quarter operating cash flow increased 57 percent over the third quarter of 1992, from $99 million to $154 million. Revenues rose because Storer cable systems and Metrophone cellular phone properties were added last year. Had Metrophone and Storer been included for the same nine months in 1992, Comcast would have posted increases of 11 percent in revenues and 12 percent in cash flow. President Brian L. Roberts said Comcast saw "potential near-term reductions" in growth because of new federal cable regulations, but that it planned to grow by marketing other cable products.
BUSINESS
March 20, 1992 | By Larry Fish, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Comcast Corp., the Philadelphia-based cable-television and cellular-phone operator, said it had cash flow of $309.3 million last year, an increase of 14 percent from 1990. Cash flow is the company's income before the subtraction of non-cash charges, interest and income taxes. Depreciation and interest expenses are usually sizable items for cable companies. Comcast did not provide a breakout for the year's fourth quarter. COMCAST CORP. (CMCSA) OTC 12 QTR. '91 12 QTR. '90 PCT. END 12/31 END 12/31 CHG. Revenue (millions)
BUSINESS
November 11, 1997 | By Reid Kanaley, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Comcast Corp. yesterday reported a smaller-than-expected loss in its third quarter, and a significant increase in cash flow, a key barometer in the cable industry. The Philadelphia provider of cable television, cellular phone service, and TV programming said cash flow had grown 23.4 percent to $365 million for the three months ended Sept. 30. Cash flow equals earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization. Cable companies say cash flow is a more accurate measure of their growth than traditional earnings, because heavy depreciation and other costs from building and acquiring systems offset earnings.
LIVING
January 19, 1996 | By Paddy Noyes, FOR THE INQUIRER
Al hasn't decided yet how he's going to make a lot of money, one of his life goals. Maybe he'll invent something. As far as he knows, playing catch, running, climbing trees and doing flips won't start a cash flow. Neither will eating spinach, fruit, and pizza with everything on it. He'll continue these pursuits, however, because he enjoys them. Al, 9, likes to play a keyboard in school, and he also likes art. His latest drawing was the solar system. And he created a farm setting in a box. "Look what I did!"
NEWS
September 12, 1991 | By Connie O'Kane, Special to The Inquirer
The Sign War is over. Members of the Burlington County Bridge Commission, parent agency of the Tacony-Palmyra Bridge, said yesterday that they would not shell out the $500 to $18,000 it would take to answer the fire of the Delaware River Port Authority. The first salvo came in the spring when the port authority, the Betsy Ross Bridge's parent agency, bought the advertising rights for the Conrail bridge over Route 73 for $600 a month and paid $1,500 to have a sign painted about a quarter mile from the Tacony-Palmyra: "Next time use: the Betsy Ross Bridge.
NEWS
March 7, 1997 | by Al Hunter Jr., Daily News Staff Writer
Advertisements on urban music stations are no longer limited mostly to drugstores, beauty shops and neighborhood eateries. Mainstream businesses are beginning to see the light - and the light is green. "It's a long, continuing fight with advertisers to get them to understand that the urban audience has spending power," said Tom Taylor of the trade publication Inside Radio. "It's not about black and white. It's about green. " And in part, that's helped boost the value of urban radio stations.
BUSINESS
February 24, 1998 | By Michael L. Rozansky, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Comcast Corp. lost more than $250 million last year but it says things couldn't be better. The Philadelphia-based communications company said yesterday that its fourth-quarter loss widened in 1997 to $88.4 million. The shortfall resulted mostly from a $118 million loss in investments, including part-owned Sprint PCS, a wireless telephone company. Comcast president Brian L. Roberts said in a statement that "financially and operationally, our company has never been in a stronger position.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
December 23, 2014 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sometimes, Richard J. Cohen says, people are under the mistaken impression that nonprofits don't have to pay as much attention to the bottom line as their for-profit brethren in the corporate world. "One of my core philosophies is that a not-for-profit is a business," said Cohen, 67, chief executive of the Public Health Management Corp., the Philadelphia manager and operator of more than 350 public health programs. "It's just not for profit. "I don't make money from it," he said.
NEWS
December 18, 2014
  NADIA JAMES, 25, of Fishtown, is founder of Griot Digital. The digital-marketing startup helps clients with content marketing and brand storytelling. James, a graduate of Duke University, formerly worked for LinkedIn in London, running international social-media campaigns for Samsung, American Express and Chanel. Q: How'd you come up with the idea for Griot Digital? A: When I left LinkedIn in 2013, people were writing content, but a lot of it wasn't good and you'd see many versions of the same thing.
NEWS
November 6, 2014 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Victor Lofts - a 341-unit luxury apartment building, hailed during its renovation a decade ago as a sign of Camden's rebirth - is up for sale. The waterfront high-rise is listed with CBRE Inc., a commercial real estate firm with offices throughout the region, for an undisclosed price. Developer Carl Dranoff converted the old Radio Corp. of America "Nipper" Building into the 356,420-square-foot apartment building in 2003, and said Tuesday that the building is at 93 percent occupancy.
SPORTS
August 30, 2013 | By David Murphy, Daily News Columnist
AND THEN, the lamb opened the fifth seal, and I heard the voice of the fifth living creature say, "Come and see!" I looked, and there before me was a maroon horse. Its rider was holding a Sharpie in his right hand, an 8-by-10 photograph in his left. Then I heard what sounded like a voice among the five living creatures saying, "Thirty minutes without football, and an address to the team regarding the situation and lessons learned. " With that, it vanished, the last layer of pretense fading soft into the Indianapolis night.
BUSINESS
July 11, 2013 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
Penn National Gaming Inc., one of six applicants for the second Philadelphia casino license , is running new advertisements touting how its proposed Hollywood Casino Philadelphia would save the city's schools and pension system. In public hearings in February and May, representatives of Wyomissing, Pa.-based Penn National said that it would own one-third of the $480 million casino planned for 700 Packer Ave. in the stadium district, and that a nonprofit called Philadelphia Casino Benefit Corp.
NEWS
December 4, 2012 | By Andrew Maykuth, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Atlas Pipeline Partners L.P., of Philadelphia, said Monday that it will pay $600 million for the operating assets of Cardinal Midstream L.L.C., a private Dallas company that operates natural gas processing plants and pipelines concentrated in Oklahoma. Atlas said the acquisition, which is expected to close by the end of the year, would increase earnings guidance for 2013 by over 20 percent and distributable cash flow per unit by 3 percent to 5 percent in 2013. The company will issue 9.25 million common partnership units to fund the deal.
NEWS
October 28, 2012 | By John P. Martin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Deep in debt and unable to pay, Michael F. Orlando Jr. had a proposal. He asked his South Philadelphia loan shark if he might earn credit - and good will - by working as a street collector. But the alleged shark, Damion Canalichio, nixed the idea. Orlando's loan wasn't his to forgive, Canalichio said. It belonged to "Stevie and Joey," shorthand that Orlando took to mean reputed mob boss Joseph Ligambi and a lieutenant, Steve Mazzone. "It's Uncle Joe's money?" Orlando asked in the 2002 conversation, recorded by the FBI. "Yeah," Canalichio said.
BUSINESS
July 24, 2012 | By Joyce M. Rosenberg and associated press
NEW YORK — Small companies are finding ways to get cash without going to the bank. Since the financial crisis, it's been harder for small companies to get loans because banks are afraid that they won't be paid back. Many small businesses that qualify for financing are reluctant to take on debt because they're skeptical about the economy improving. Amid that uncertainty, some small-business owners are turning to services that help them get paid faster while others are making deals to stretch out payments without accruing interest.
NEWS
August 3, 2011 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Universal theme park in Florida with its popular Harry Potter attraction and the high-grossing box-office blockbuster Fast and Furious 5 helped boost Comcast Corp.'s pro forma second-quarter revenue by 9.4 percent. The Philadelphia-based company lost fewer cable-TV subscribers during this year's second quarter than the last year's - 238,000 compared with 265,000 - and added more high-speed Internet customers, which has been a focus of growth for Comcast. The company added 144,000 Internet customers compared with 118,000 added in the year-ago quarter.
NEWS
July 19, 2011
By John E. Sununu 'I have never been in banking. " Those words sounded pretty defensive when Treasury Secretary Tim Geithner uttered them two years ago. The financial crisis had left nerves raw, and Damon Silvers, my colleague on the congressional panel watching over the federal bailout, had just referred to Geithner's supposed banking background. Silvers pushed on, suggesting, "It was a very long time ago. " The secretary was visibly irritated. "Actually never. " Silvers pressed a third time, as though Geithner were some kind of amnesiac: "Investment banking, I meant.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|