FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
October 11, 1989 | By David Johnston, Michael E. Ruane and Mike Schurman, Special to The Inquirer Inquirer staff writer John Way Jennings, correspondent Bill Sokolic and the Associated Press contributed to this article
Three top executives of developer Donald Trump's Atlantic City casino empire were killed yesterday when their helicopter lost its main rotor and crashed on the wooded median strip of the Garden State Parkway about two miles north of the Barnegat toll plaza. The helicopter's pilot and co-pilot also were killed in the crash, which occurred shortly before 2 p.m. about 30 miles north of Atlantic City. Witnesses said they heard a loud bang and saw the sleek, Italian-made helicopter's 36-foot main rotor stop spinning and then "pop" off. The craft, flying at 2,800 feet and probably traveling about 150 m.p.h.
BUSINESS
March 17, 2005 | By Suzette Parmley INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Gary DiBartolomeo, the former president of Caesars Atlantic City who was stripped of his casino license four years ago because he lied about his gambling addiction, got his license reinstated and a second chance yesterday. "Thank you very much," said a barely audible DiBartolomeo, after the New Jersey Casino Control Commission, which regulates gambling in Atlantic City, voted, 5-0, in favor of reissuing him a license. With that, DiBartolomeo got up and quickly left the room.
NEWS
August 14, 1991 | By Bill Kent, Special to The Inquirer
The Jovers have 12 minutes in Merv Griffin's Resorts' "Starstruck" show. This doesn't sound like much, especially on those nights, about once a month, when Griffin himself grabs a microphone and makes a surprise appearance. When Griffin appears, the Jovers have a tag line, one of many that have been tried, proved and seasoned from nearly 30 years in front of audiences. Fe (pronounced Fay) Jover halts her nonstop gush of bubbly, British- accented giggles, and says quite seriously, "Merv has asked us to make a special announcement.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 2008 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
You're sitting on the edge of a swimming pool so blue, you imagine you're in the Caribbean. The vivid flowers and aquatic plantings surrounding this pool are so spectacular, they rival those found near Australia's Great Barrier Reef. Now, you close your eyes and savor a meal so satisfying you'd swear you were in Paris. All this after a pedicure so perfect, a facial so cleansing and a massage so soothing, you think maybe you've just died and gone to . . . Atlantic City?
NEWS
July 14, 2014 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
ATLANTIC CITY - While the amusement-park sound of slot machines filtered through Trump Plaza on Saturday, the men and women who staff the casino put on their brave faces. While they dealt cards, swept the gaming floor, or emptied trash bins as usual, the crisis in this battered resort had deepened the night before. Owners of Trump Plaza confirmed they plan to close the casino in mid-September and will issue formal layoff notices Monday to about 1,600 employees. "I'm not ready to believe it until I get that notice in my hands, telling me it's time to look for another job," said slot attendant Parimal Mehta, 57, of Egg Harbor Township, who has worked at Trump Plaza for 22 years.
NEWS
July 25, 2014 | By Andrew Seidman and Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writers
New Jersey Senate President Stephen Sweeney said Wednesday that he envisioned creating a nonprofit board composed of top business leaders that would reinvest gaming revenue from potential casinos in North Jersey into Atlantic City. Faced with the prospect of four Atlantic City casinos closing this year, Sweeney recently signaled an openness to casino expansion in North Jersey, possibly as soon as November 2015. Sweeney's idea is one of several being contemplated as the Shore city grapples with declining gaming revenue and worker layoffs.
NEWS
July 14, 2014 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
ATLANTIC CITY - Behind doors so richly red they glow even amid the glittering casino, the Borgata Resort's Music Box theater on Sunday evening will welcome something it wasn't built for: the Bay-Atlantic Symphony playing the Shostakovich Piano Concerto No. 1 with superstar pianist Yuja Wang. There are no obvious explanations. "It's an eclectic age," says Jed Gaylin, the 17-year music director of the Bay-Atlantic Symphony. "Classical music is no longer 'that stuff.' It's a change of pace.
NEWS
July 16, 2014 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
ATLANTIC CITY - In the latest blow to Atlantic City, layoff notices were issued to Trump Plaza Hotel & Casino employees Monday, advising them that the casino will close in mid-September. That would make Trump Plaza the fourth casino to close or threaten to close in this resort by fall. It also leaves just one Trump-branded casino - the Trump Taj Mahal - from what used to be three. About 1,600 workers would be affected by this latest shutdown. Trump Plaza issued a statement just before noon Monday stating: "WARN notices were sent to the employees of Trump Plaza Hotel and Casino today to advise them that the management and board of directors of Trump Plaza Associates L.L.C.
NEWS
December 26, 2008
I TOTALLY AGREE with you about not having the casino built in the Gallery and allowing it to be built on the waterfront. The plans that were shown in the paper for the waterfront casino were beautiful. I can't even imagine putting it in the Gallery. I am wondering if the main reason to put it there is people will have to pay a high price for parking? Renee Towns, Philadelphia
ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 2014 | BY CHUCK DARROW, Daily News Staff Writer darrowc@phillynews.com, 215-313-3134
ONCE UPON a time, Atlantic City's casino showrooms hummed and buzzed year-round. Classic gaming-hall venues like the Claridge's Palace Theater and the Trump Plaza showroom were dark only when one midweek presentation had ended and another was preparing to open. Today, extended-run presentations, much like the city itself, are pretty much warm-weather attractions - somewhat odd when you consider that summertime is AyCee's peak season and thus less-dependent on such attendance-growing lures.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 27, 2014
New Jersey wants to double down on a losing bet. Sites are being considered for proposed North Jersey casinos that would soak up diminishing dollars from an industry that has already overplayed its hand. Both Gov. Christie and Senate President Stephen Sweeney (D., Gloucester) say any casino up north must share proceeds with Atlantic City, just as gaming revenue from the south has traveled north over the years. But what can be the benefit to Atlantic City if new North Jersey casinos lure even more gamblers?
NEWS
July 25, 2014 | By Andrew Seidman and Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writers
New Jersey Senate President Stephen Sweeney said Wednesday that he envisioned creating a nonprofit board composed of top business leaders that would reinvest gaming revenue from potential casinos in North Jersey into Atlantic City. Faced with the prospect of four Atlantic City casinos closing this year, Sweeney recently signaled an openness to casino expansion in North Jersey, possibly as soon as November 2015. Sweeney's idea is one of several being contemplated as the Shore city grapples with declining gaming revenue and worker layoffs.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 2014 | BY CHUCK DARROW, Daily News Staff Writer darrowc@phillynews.com, 215-313-3134
ONCE UPON a time, Atlantic City's casino showrooms hummed and buzzed year-round. Classic gaming-hall venues like the Claridge's Palace Theater and the Trump Plaza showroom were dark only when one midweek presentation had ended and another was preparing to open. Today, extended-run presentations, much like the city itself, are pretty much warm-weather attractions - somewhat odd when you consider that summertime is AyCee's peak season and thus less-dependent on such attendance-growing lures.
NEWS
July 22, 2014 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
ATLANTIC CITY - This resort faces the prospect of having four major vacancies on its famed Boardwalk come mid-September. The grim reality sank in July 14 when Trump Plaza issued layoff notices and targeted Sept. 16 as the date to cease operating as a casino. Perception is reality in tourism, experts say, and the Boardwalk is synonymous with Atlantic City. How will four hulking, empty buildings sit with visitors - especially at night - and will they impede tourism when Atlantic City needs it the most?
NEWS
July 20, 2014 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
A study by two Philadelphia researchers has found that crime in the immediate area of SugarHouse Casino in Philadelphia's Fishtown section has not increased since the casino opened 2010. The study, by Lallen T. Johnson, assistant professor of criminal justice at Drexel University, and Jerry H. Ratcliffe, chair of Temple University's department of criminal justice, says crime rates in Fishtown were largely unaffected by the arrival of SugarHouse in the 1000 block of North Delaware Avenue in September 2010.
NEWS
July 19, 2014 | By Chris Palmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
The odds appear stacked in Parx Casino's favor. At a public input hearing Thursday ahead of a township vote on whether to renew the casino's gaming license, comments from township and state officials and regulators were almost universally in favor of renewal. "This has not only been a home run," State Rep. Gene DiGirolamo (R., Bucks) said of the eight-year-old casino. "This has absolutely been a grand slam for Bensalem Township. " Parx officials opened the meeting with a presentation about the gaming facility, discussing the millions of dollars of tax proceeds that have gone to the township, the 2,000 jobs the casino supports, and its donations to community groups.
NEWS
July 16, 2014
The biggest gamble in Atlantic City these days is the gambling business. With Trump Plaza likely breathing its last gaudy gasps, politicians in New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and other states should be hastening to abandon government-sanctioned casinos. But many are poised, like so many problem gamblers, to chase the loss. The probable closure of Trump Plaza, which cruelly left some 1,600 employees to learn they could be laid off from news reports, means Atlantic City stands to lose a third of its casinos in less than a year.
NEWS
July 16, 2014 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
ATLANTIC CITY - With the Trump Plaza Hotel & Casino's expected closing, Donald Trump, whose name is emblazoned on the casino and who once owned three of the gambling palaces here, said he can't help but feel bad for the resort he helped build. In an interview Monday, Trump also predicted that an oversaturation of casinos would mean more closings in other places, including the Philadelphia area. Trump endured multiple bankruptcies as head of Trump Entertainment Resorts Inc., and he and his name will always be linked with Atlantic City even if his share of the casinos is now only about 10 percent.
NEWS
July 16, 2014 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
ATLANTIC CITY - In the latest blow to Atlantic City, layoff notices were issued to Trump Plaza Hotel & Casino employees Monday, advising them that the casino will close in mid-September. That would make Trump Plaza the fourth casino to close or threaten to close in this resort by fall. It also leaves just one Trump-branded casino - the Trump Taj Mahal - from what used to be three. About 1,600 workers would be affected by this latest shutdown. Trump Plaza issued a statement just before noon Monday stating: "WARN notices were sent to the employees of Trump Plaza Hotel and Casino today to advise them that the management and board of directors of Trump Plaza Associates L.L.C.
NEWS
July 14, 2014 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
ATLANTIC CITY - Behind doors so richly red they glow even amid the glittering casino, the Borgata Resort's Music Box theater on Sunday evening will welcome something it wasn't built for: the Bay-Atlantic Symphony playing the Shostakovich Piano Concerto No. 1 with superstar pianist Yuja Wang. There are no obvious explanations. "It's an eclectic age," says Jed Gaylin, the 17-year music director of the Bay-Atlantic Symphony. "Classical music is no longer 'that stuff.' It's a change of pace.
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