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NEWS
October 11, 1989 | By David Johnston, Michael E. Ruane and Mike Schurman, Special to The Inquirer Inquirer staff writer John Way Jennings, correspondent Bill Sokolic and the Associated Press contributed to this article
Three top executives of developer Donald Trump's Atlantic City casino empire were killed yesterday when their helicopter lost its main rotor and crashed on the wooded median strip of the Garden State Parkway about two miles north of the Barnegat toll plaza. The helicopter's pilot and co-pilot also were killed in the crash, which occurred shortly before 2 p.m. about 30 miles north of Atlantic City. Witnesses said they heard a loud bang and saw the sleek, Italian-made helicopter's 36-foot main rotor stop spinning and then "pop" off. The craft, flying at 2,800 feet and probably traveling about 150 m.p.h.
BUSINESS
March 17, 2005 | By Suzette Parmley INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Gary DiBartolomeo, the former president of Caesars Atlantic City who was stripped of his casino license four years ago because he lied about his gambling addiction, got his license reinstated and a second chance yesterday. "Thank you very much," said a barely audible DiBartolomeo, after the New Jersey Casino Control Commission, which regulates gambling in Atlantic City, voted, 5-0, in favor of reissuing him a license. With that, DiBartolomeo got up and quickly left the room.
NEWS
August 14, 1991 | By Bill Kent, Special to The Inquirer
The Jovers have 12 minutes in Merv Griffin's Resorts' "Starstruck" show. This doesn't sound like much, especially on those nights, about once a month, when Griffin himself grabs a microphone and makes a surprise appearance. When Griffin appears, the Jovers have a tag line, one of many that have been tried, proved and seasoned from nearly 30 years in front of audiences. Fe (pronounced Fay) Jover halts her nonstop gush of bubbly, British- accented giggles, and says quite seriously, "Merv has asked us to make a special announcement.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 2008 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
You're sitting on the edge of a swimming pool so blue, you imagine you're in the Caribbean. The vivid flowers and aquatic plantings surrounding this pool are so spectacular, they rival those found near Australia's Great Barrier Reef. Now, you close your eyes and savor a meal so satisfying you'd swear you were in Paris. All this after a pedicure so perfect, a facial so cleansing and a massage so soothing, you think maybe you've just died and gone to . . . Atlantic City?
NEWS
December 26, 2008
I TOTALLY AGREE with you about not having the casino built in the Gallery and allowing it to be built on the waterfront. The plans that were shown in the paper for the waterfront casino were beautiful. I can't even imagine putting it in the Gallery. I am wondering if the main reason to put it there is people will have to pay a high price for parking? Renee Towns, Philadelphia
NEWS
April 22, 2010 | By Harris Steinberg
Philadelphia was dealt a bad hand when the Foxwoods casino was proposed for the city's Delaware River waterfront. But with the future of the project in doubt, local leaders have a rare chance to reshape it. Now that Foxwoods' casino license could be revoked and given to another group, city and state officials must acknowledge that plunking down a casino wherever a developer wants it is not wise. We've also learned that casinos designed without comprehensive traffic and land-use planning don't work very well.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 24, 1999 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
When he reteamed with Robert De Niro and Joe Pesci to make Casino in 1995, Martin Scorsese found himself in competition with his past achievements. His incomparably sardonic assessment of the mob in 1990's GoodFellas was rightly regarded as one of his best films. If he didn't match that movie in Casino, Scorsese gave us a dazzling look at the point where money and greed meet sex and need in the Las Vegas of the '70s. De Niro's Sam Rothstein demonstrates such a flair for numbers while running a sports book that the mob chooses him to take control of its operation in Las Vegas.
NEWS
April 11, 2008
THE state Supreme Court has ordered the city to grant zoning to Foxwoods. The court said Foxwoods "spent months working with the city to craft a plan of development that addressed issues of concern to the city and to residents living near the Foxwoods site. " This statement is based on a bald-faced lie. One of the main issues of concern, yet to be addressed, is the social and economic cost of having a casino in the neighborhood. We have asked Gov. Rendell to do his homework by defining the economic and social costs associated with casinos.
NEWS
July 11, 2012 | By Suzette Parmley, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If June revenue numbers released Tuesday by the New Jersey Division of Gaming Enforcement are a barometer of how well a casino will perform in the slower winter months in Atlantic City, then the new Revel is in trouble. June is a peak month at the Jersey Shore resort, and the mega casino generated $14.9 million on total gambling revenue, ranking it 8th among the city's dozen gambling halls for the third consecutive month since it debuted April 2. By comparison, market leader Borgata pulled in $53.3 million last month, about three and a half times more than Revel.
NEWS
August 22, 2012 | By Wayne Parry, Associated Press
ATLANTIC CITY - At first, it seemed like a coincidence, the kind of thing that happens from time to time at a casino, where the same number or same sequence of cards occurs twice in a row. But when the players at an April game of mini-baccarat at the Golden Nugget Atlantic City kept seeing the same sequence of cards dealt, over and over and over again, their eyes grew wide and their bets grew bigger, zooming from $10 a hand to $5,000. Forty-one consecutive winning hands later, the 14 players had racked up more than $1.5 million in winnings - surrounded by casino security convinced they had cheated but unable to prove how. In a lawsuit against a Kansas City playing card manufacturer, the Golden Nugget contends the cards were unshuffled, despite being promised to be preshuffled and ready to use. The April 30 incident was the latest instance of unshuffled decks of cards causing headaches for an Atlantic City casino.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 21, 2015 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
ATLANTIC CITY - Can Atlantic City be a real place, a city with a life separate from its casino identity? Philadelphia developer John Longacre (American Sardine Bar, South Philly Tap Room, Newbold) thinks so. "Every time a casino closes, I get goose bumps," he said. That's because Longacre - along with a handful of developers who are to gather at a forum at noon Wednesday on new housing opportunities in Atlantic City - sees the epic contraction of the casino market as the key to the city's reinvented future.
BUSINESS
January 20, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
The loss of 8,000 jobs in Atlantic City's casino industry in the last 12 months has sent shock waves through the region's economy, but an even more precipitous collapse is underway in the city's property-tax base. Eight or nine years ago, casinos owned 85 percent of Atlantic City's real estate, based on assessed values, Mayor Don Guardian said last week. Now, they account for about 55 percent of the assessed values and are expected to keep falling, he said. A proposal by New Jersey Senate President Stephen Sweeney (D., Gloucester)
NEWS
January 19, 2015 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
ATLANTIC CITY - The winter here is traditionally brutal for resort business, but a glut of vehicles to transport patrons that once filled the casinos has created a new class of beleaguered taxicab drivers. Nadir Khan, 57, is ready to throw in the towel after four years. "I can't make a living," Khan said as he sat in his taxi outside the Trump Taj Mahal last week. From 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Wednesday, Khan had two fares totaling $29. The lease on his cab was recently dropped from $275 to $170 a week because business has been so off. Still, Khan - who has three children and a stay-at-home wife to support - can't cover the lower fee, much less his daily gas. "I bring my dreams to America, but now I don't know where to go," said the Pakistani native who arrived in Atlantic City in 1986 - eight years after the first casino, Resorts, opened on the Boardwalk.
BUSINESS
January 18, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
U.S. District Judge Jerome B. Simandle scheduled an emergency hearing for Tuesday in Camden to hear arguments to block the sale of Atlantic City's Revel Casino Hotel by tenants who spent millions on facilities for the failed casino. Angel Management Group, which spent $16 million to build Revel's popular HQ clubs and Center Bar, appealed a Jan. 8 order by U.S. Bankruptcy Judge Gloria M. Burns that would allow Florida investor Glenn Straub to buy Revel "free and clear of liens, claims, encumbrances, and interests.
BUSINESS
January 17, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
The bankruptcy filing Thursday in Chicago by Caesars Entertainment Corp.'s largest unit includes Caesars and Bally's on the Atlantic City Boardwalk, but not the Harrah's casinos in Chester and Atlantic City. All Caesars properties included in the bankruptcy remain open. "With the overwhelming support of our first-lien bondholders, we are moving forward to implement our previously announced restructuring plan," Caesars chief executive Gary Loveman said. The long-anticipated filing by the Las Vegas gambling giant sets up a jurisdictional fight.
NEWS
January 15, 2015 | By Melanie Burney, Inquirer Staff Writer
New Jersey has landed a $29.4 million federal grant to help displaced Atlantic City casino workers affected by recent closings, officials said Tuesday. The National Emergency Grant through the U.S. Department of Labor will be used for training programs to help the workers learn skills for jobs in new fields. Atlantic City lost four of its 12 casinos last year, throwing more than 8,000 people out of work, roughly a fifth of the casino workforce. The gaming industry has struggled to stay afloat amid competition from nearby states' casinos.
NEWS
January 10, 2015 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
ATLANTIC CITY - The new method of casino taxation under consideration by state legislators could have an unintended casualty: the highly regarded Atlantic City Free Public Library. State legislators acknowledged Thursday that the Atlantic City recovery bills, as currently written, would leave the library in the lurch for much of its current $5 million budget. Library director Maureen Sherr-Frank said Thursday that it would remove 70 percent of the funding. Marshall Spevak, aide to State Sen. Vincent Mazzeo, said legislators would seek a remedy in the bill to prevent any drastic impact on the library, which also operates a branch on Richmond Avenue, and the city's historical museum and archives.
BUSINESS
January 10, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
U.S. Bankruptcy Judge Gloria M. Burns made two rulings Thursday to help clear the way for the sale of the former Revel Casino Hotel in Atlantic City to Florida investor Glenn Straub for $95.4 million. Burns said previously she intended to approve the sale, but a sale order - required before the deal can be completed - was not entered because several objections needed to be resolved or formally put off until later. She settled those issues Thursday. She said Straub can buy the $2.4 billion property unencumbered by an agreement Revel had with the Casino Reinvestment Development Authority and by leases with restaurants, night clubs, and other tenants in the building.
NEWS
January 7, 2015 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
ATLANTIC CITY - Liza Cartmell, president of the casino-funded Atlantic City Alliance marketing group, said Monday that she was leaving her $400,000-a-year post, ahead of legislation being considered that would disband the group and divert its $30-million-a-year funding. "As you all so painfully know, Atlantic City is in a time of transition and all its major institutions are proactively adapting to a new reality," Cartmell wrote in an e-mail "to my AC friends. " She said the alliance, responsible for the "Do AC" campaign, would continue its work "with a reduced staff and realigned resources and priorities - pending definitive legislative/executive action to resolve its status and possible funding (or not)
NEWS
January 5, 2015 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
EGG HARBOR TOWNSHIP, N.J. - Last year started out bad and only got worse for Jose and Karla Mercado. Both worked at the Atlantic Club and lost their kitchen jobs last January when the casino became the first of four in Atlantic City to close. They're still out of work, and with their unemployment benefits and food stamps exhausted, and their savings nearly depleted, their only relief comes from the Community Food Bank of New Jersey's branch here in Egg Harbor Township. The Mercados are among 8,000 South Jersey families stung by the casino layoffs that the center, a nondescript yellow building at 6735 Black Horse Pike, is assisting.
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