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NEWS
October 11, 1989 | By David Johnston, Michael E. Ruane and Mike Schurman, Special to The Inquirer Inquirer staff writer John Way Jennings, correspondent Bill Sokolic and the Associated Press contributed to this article
Three top executives of developer Donald Trump's Atlantic City casino empire were killed yesterday when their helicopter lost its main rotor and crashed on the wooded median strip of the Garden State Parkway about two miles north of the Barnegat toll plaza. The helicopter's pilot and co-pilot also were killed in the crash, which occurred shortly before 2 p.m. about 30 miles north of Atlantic City. Witnesses said they heard a loud bang and saw the sleek, Italian-made helicopter's 36-foot main rotor stop spinning and then "pop" off. The craft, flying at 2,800 feet and probably traveling about 150 m.p.h.
BUSINESS
March 17, 2005 | By Suzette Parmley INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Gary DiBartolomeo, the former president of Caesars Atlantic City who was stripped of his casino license four years ago because he lied about his gambling addiction, got his license reinstated and a second chance yesterday. "Thank you very much," said a barely audible DiBartolomeo, after the New Jersey Casino Control Commission, which regulates gambling in Atlantic City, voted, 5-0, in favor of reissuing him a license. With that, DiBartolomeo got up and quickly left the room.
NEWS
August 14, 1991 | By Bill Kent, Special to The Inquirer
The Jovers have 12 minutes in Merv Griffin's Resorts' "Starstruck" show. This doesn't sound like much, especially on those nights, about once a month, when Griffin himself grabs a microphone and makes a surprise appearance. When Griffin appears, the Jovers have a tag line, one of many that have been tried, proved and seasoned from nearly 30 years in front of audiences. Fe (pronounced Fay) Jover halts her nonstop gush of bubbly, British- accented giggles, and says quite seriously, "Merv has asked us to make a special announcement.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 2008 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
You're sitting on the edge of a swimming pool so blue, you imagine you're in the Caribbean. The vivid flowers and aquatic plantings surrounding this pool are so spectacular, they rival those found near Australia's Great Barrier Reef. Now, you close your eyes and savor a meal so satisfying you'd swear you were in Paris. All this after a pedicure so perfect, a facial so cleansing and a massage so soothing, you think maybe you've just died and gone to . . . Atlantic City?
NEWS
December 26, 2008
I TOTALLY AGREE with you about not having the casino built in the Gallery and allowing it to be built on the waterfront. The plans that were shown in the paper for the waterfront casino were beautiful. I can't even imagine putting it in the Gallery. I am wondering if the main reason to put it there is people will have to pay a high price for parking? Renee Towns, Philadelphia
NEWS
September 3, 2014 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
ATLANTIC CITY - In the end, the Revel ball did not roll off the tower into the ocean, and no buyer emerged in the middle of the night to save the day. Instead, Revel merely unraveled through the night to an anticlimactic pre-dawn closing of its moribund casino floor. Employees of Ivan Kane's Royal Jelly Burlesque Nightclub held a stubbornly spirited after party as remaining on-duty dealers watched from emptying tables, waiting to inventory final stacks of chips. One supervisor put fingers to his own head like a gun and rolled his eyes.
NEWS
April 22, 2010 | By Harris Steinberg
Philadelphia was dealt a bad hand when the Foxwoods casino was proposed for the city's Delaware River waterfront. But with the future of the project in doubt, local leaders have a rare chance to reshape it. Now that Foxwoods' casino license could be revoked and given to another group, city and state officials must acknowledge that plunking down a casino wherever a developer wants it is not wise. We've also learned that casinos designed without comprehensive traffic and land-use planning don't work very well.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 24, 1999 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
When he reteamed with Robert De Niro and Joe Pesci to make Casino in 1995, Martin Scorsese found himself in competition with his past achievements. His incomparably sardonic assessment of the mob in 1990's GoodFellas was rightly regarded as one of his best films. If he didn't match that movie in Casino, Scorsese gave us a dazzling look at the point where money and greed meet sex and need in the Las Vegas of the '70s. De Niro's Sam Rothstein demonstrates such a flair for numbers while running a sports book that the mob chooses him to take control of its operation in Las Vegas.
NEWS
April 11, 2008
THE state Supreme Court has ordered the city to grant zoning to Foxwoods. The court said Foxwoods "spent months working with the city to craft a plan of development that addressed issues of concern to the city and to residents living near the Foxwoods site. " This statement is based on a bald-faced lie. One of the main issues of concern, yet to be addressed, is the social and economic cost of having a casino in the neighborhood. We have asked Gov. Rendell to do his homework by defining the economic and social costs associated with casinos.
NEWS
July 11, 2012 | By Suzette Parmley, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If June revenue numbers released Tuesday by the New Jersey Division of Gaming Enforcement are a barometer of how well a casino will perform in the slower winter months in Atlantic City, then the new Revel is in trouble. June is a peak month at the Jersey Shore resort, and the mega casino generated $14.9 million on total gambling revenue, ranking it 8th among the city's dozen gambling halls for the third consecutive month since it debuted April 2. By comparison, market leader Borgata pulled in $53.3 million last month, about three and a half times more than Revel.
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BUSINESS
September 29, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Atlantic City casino hotels went bankrupt in the past - no uncommon occurrence - suppliers could count on getting 60 percent to 80 percent of what they were owed. Like much else in Atlantic City, that has changed. "There's no reason to believe we'll ever get very much of it at all," said Nelson Dilg, whose Egg Harbor City, N.J., company cleans kitchen hoods and grease traps, and has experienced earlier rounds of casino bankruptcies. The Atlantic Club, Revel AC Inc., and Trump Entertainment Resorts Inc., the three Atlantic City casino operators that have filed for bankruptcy protection since last November, owe Dilg's Nelbud Services Group Inc. $200,000.
BUSINESS
September 22, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Atlantic City has become a place where hedge-fund managers go to lose their shirts. Three of the four Atlantic City casinos that closed this year (or four of five, if Taj Mahal closes in November) were controlled by hedge funds that suffered deep - but difficult to measure - losses. By contrast, operators with deep experience with casinos bought Resorts and the former Trump Marina (now Golden Nugget) in 2010 and 2011. Both casinos are showing signs of turning the corner - although the Atlantic City market overall remains far from settled.
BUSINESS
September 18, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pennsylvania's 12 casinos won $66.4 million from poker, craps, and other table games players last month, 4.6 percent more than in the same period last year. But results were split on the basis of individual casinos. Half - led by Sands Casino Resort Bethlehem with a 20 percent increase - were up, and half were down. The same was true locally. Parx Casino and SugarHouse Casino recorded gains, while Harrah's Philadelphia and Valley Forge posted lower table games revenues. Aggregate table games revenue at the four Philadelphia-area casinos was up 1.7 percent, to $27.6 million from $27.3 million.
NEWS
September 18, 2014 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
ATLANTIC CITY - The epic swoon of Atlantic City continued Tuesday as the Trump Plaza was put out of its stained-carpet, squeaky-revolving-door, no-room-service, center-of-the-Boardwalk misery, as its dedicated hospice workers dealt a final hand of blackjack. "Sit down and play a hand, you won't get another chance," said Shelly Orloff, an IBM mainframe system programmer from Bergen County, around 3 a.m. Gambling operations were stopped at 5:59 a.m., the official end of the gaming day by state regulation.
BUSINESS
September 17, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
SugarHouse Casino in Philadelphia has gone to court in a bid to recoup more than $520,000 from 63 gamblers who have failed to repay markers - casino loans - issued in the last four years. The action offers a peek into the opaque world of casino credit, an unusual form of commerce in that the money that is lent usually goes right back to the lender in the form of gambling losses. That makes it a transaction fundamentally different than a retailer selling a sofa on credit. "There's an incentive for liberal lending because the odds are that the money is not leaving the building," said Paul Boni, a lawyer in Philadelphia and a board member of Stop Predatory Gambling, a national advocacy group.
NEWS
September 16, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
ATLANTIC CITY - Vidilia Ormolea stayed true to her favorite casino here to the bitter end, squeezing in a final visit to Trump Plaza on Sunday - despite peeling wallpaper in the hotel rooms and other signs of a years-long decline. The friendly staff kept her coming back, said Ormolea, 67, who lives in Bethlehem, Pa., and said she has been a regular at Trump Plaza since it opened in 1984. It is scheduled to close Tuesday. "They took my money, yes, but I enjoyed myself here," said Ormolea, who was up $147.67 in free slot play shortly after noon.
NEWS
September 15, 2014 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
EGG HARBOR TOWNSHIP, N.J. - Walfa Caceres was the first of the sisters to make the journey to Atlantic City. It was 1992 and she was 26. New York City, where they had moved to join their father, Toribio Caceres, a former police officer at the U.S. Embassy in the Dominican Republic who now owned a fried-chicken restaurant on 168th Street, had never really suited the Caceres siblings. "Too loud," said Fanny Caceres, five years younger than Walfa. "Too busy. " But in Atlantic City, something clicked for Walfa - particularly when she saw the line of customers stretching for the new French Quarter buffet at Showboat, willing to wait two hours to get inside.
BUSINESS
September 12, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Revel AC Inc. said in a bankruptcy court filing Wednesday that it had reached a deal to sell its $2.4 billion Atlantic City property to South Florida developer Glenn Straub for $90 million in cash. The deal was reached Friday, according to the filing. That was less than a week after Revel closed, putting nearly 3,000 people out of work. The offer is less than 4 percent of the casino's original price tag. "It's not going to be just a casino," Straub said. "There's four people that would make excellent casino operators, but that building is much, much more than just a casino.
BUSINESS
September 11, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
The purge of Atlantic City's weakest casinos continued Tuesday, as Trump Entertainment Resorts Inc. filed for bankruptcy in Delaware, a week before it plans to shut down Trump Plaza. The company also said it expects to pull the plug on Taj Mahal in November if it fails to get concessions from the casino's unionized workers. The Taj Mahal, which employs 2,963, would be the fifth Atlantic City casino to close this year. Despite the threat of closure, Bob McDevitt, president of Unite Here Local 54, said there was little the union could do to help bail out Trump Taj Mahal.
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