FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
October 11, 1989 | By David Johnston, Michael E. Ruane and Mike Schurman, Special to The Inquirer Inquirer staff writer John Way Jennings, correspondent Bill Sokolic and the Associated Press contributed to this article
Three top executives of developer Donald Trump's Atlantic City casino empire were killed yesterday when their helicopter lost its main rotor and crashed on the wooded median strip of the Garden State Parkway about two miles north of the Barnegat toll plaza. The helicopter's pilot and co-pilot also were killed in the crash, which occurred shortly before 2 p.m. about 30 miles north of Atlantic City. Witnesses said they heard a loud bang and saw the sleek, Italian-made helicopter's 36-foot main rotor stop spinning and then "pop" off. The craft, flying at 2,800 feet and probably traveling about 150 m.p.h.
BUSINESS
March 17, 2005 | By Suzette Parmley INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Gary DiBartolomeo, the former president of Caesars Atlantic City who was stripped of his casino license four years ago because he lied about his gambling addiction, got his license reinstated and a second chance yesterday. "Thank you very much," said a barely audible DiBartolomeo, after the New Jersey Casino Control Commission, which regulates gambling in Atlantic City, voted, 5-0, in favor of reissuing him a license. With that, DiBartolomeo got up and quickly left the room.
NEWS
August 14, 1991 | By Bill Kent, Special to The Inquirer
The Jovers have 12 minutes in Merv Griffin's Resorts' "Starstruck" show. This doesn't sound like much, especially on those nights, about once a month, when Griffin himself grabs a microphone and makes a surprise appearance. When Griffin appears, the Jovers have a tag line, one of many that have been tried, proved and seasoned from nearly 30 years in front of audiences. Fe (pronounced Fay) Jover halts her nonstop gush of bubbly, British- accented giggles, and says quite seriously, "Merv has asked us to make a special announcement.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 2008 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
You're sitting on the edge of a swimming pool so blue, you imagine you're in the Caribbean. The vivid flowers and aquatic plantings surrounding this pool are so spectacular, they rival those found near Australia's Great Barrier Reef. Now, you close your eyes and savor a meal so satisfying you'd swear you were in Paris. All this after a pedicure so perfect, a facial so cleansing and a massage so soothing, you think maybe you've just died and gone to . . . Atlantic City?
NEWS
December 26, 2008
I TOTALLY AGREE with you about not having the casino built in the Gallery and allowing it to be built on the waterfront. The plans that were shown in the paper for the waterfront casino were beautiful. I can't even imagine putting it in the Gallery. I am wondering if the main reason to put it there is people will have to pay a high price for parking? Renee Towns, Philadelphia
NEWS
August 22, 2012 | By Wayne Parry, Associated Press
ATLANTIC CITY - At first, it seemed like a coincidence, the kind of thing that happens from time to time at a casino, where the same number or same sequence of cards occurs twice in a row. But when the players at an April game of mini-baccarat at the Golden Nugget Atlantic City kept seeing the same sequence of cards dealt, over and over and over again, their eyes grew wide and their bets grew bigger, zooming from $10 a hand to $5,000. Forty-one consecutive winning hands later, the 14 players had racked up more than $1.5 million in winnings - surrounded by casino security convinced they had cheated but unable to prove how. In a lawsuit against a Kansas City playing card manufacturer, the Golden Nugget contends the cards were unshuffled, despite being promised to be preshuffled and ready to use. The April 30 incident was the latest instance of unshuffled decks of cards causing headaches for an Atlantic City casino.
NEWS
May 18, 2007 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
ATLANTIC CITY - Last year's tan had long faded away, and the waves were brisk with a pre-season chill. But finally, after the cool intervening months since last summer, the Pier Shops at Caesars is heating up. On its third-floor restaurant concourse, you can sit back in a wooden chaise-longue, grab a cocktail, and actually put your toes in the sand of the faux-beach that lines the windowed hall. Watching the waves crack below the Pier onto the beach from the comfort of this seaside mall was about the closest I've gotten to imagining a year-round summer.
NEWS
April 22, 2010 | By Harris Steinberg
Philadelphia was dealt a bad hand when the Foxwoods casino was proposed for the city's Delaware River waterfront. But with the future of the project in doubt, local leaders have a rare chance to reshape it. Now that Foxwoods' casino license could be revoked and given to another group, city and state officials must acknowledge that plunking down a casino wherever a developer wants it is not wise. We've also learned that casinos designed without comprehensive traffic and land-use planning don't work very well.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 24, 1999 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
When he reteamed with Robert De Niro and Joe Pesci to make Casino in 1995, Martin Scorsese found himself in competition with his past achievements. His incomparably sardonic assessment of the mob in 1990's GoodFellas was rightly regarded as one of his best films. If he didn't match that movie in Casino, Scorsese gave us a dazzling look at the point where money and greed meet sex and need in the Las Vegas of the '70s. De Niro's Sam Rothstein demonstrates such a flair for numbers while running a sports book that the mob chooses him to take control of its operation in Las Vegas.
NEWS
April 11, 2008
THE state Supreme Court has ordered the city to grant zoning to Foxwoods. The court said Foxwoods "spent months working with the city to craft a plan of development that addressed issues of concern to the city and to residents living near the Foxwoods site. " This statement is based on a bald-faced lie. One of the main issues of concern, yet to be addressed, is the social and economic cost of having a casino in the neighborhood. We have asked Gov. Rendell to do his homework by defining the economic and social costs associated with casinos.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 14, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker and Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writers
Until the last minute, Philadelphia NAACP president Rodney Muhammad was set to denounce a developer who intends to build a casino in South Philadelphia. Muhammad was to star at a City Hall news conference Thursday to release a report on alleged racist practices by Baltimore-based Cordish Cos. He decided not to attend, he said Friday, after receiving a call from Mayor Nutter, who said they needed to talk, and a second call from national NAACP officials. Without Muhammad's presence, the news conference, organized by Jason Ortiz, a managing director with consulting firm Metropolitan Public Strategies of New York, unraveled.
NEWS
June 14, 2015 | By Dan McQuade, For The Inquirer
The Borgata is taking its customers to a place they haven't usually been directed to: outside. On Saturday, on what was a small patch of grass sandwiched between two parking garages and a surface lot, the Borgata Hotel Casino & Spa will open Festival Park, a laid-back outdoor concert venue. The kick-off event, with a low price tag ($20, meant to build buzz), features bands with ties to New Jersey (Southside Johnny and the Asbury Jukes) and Philadelphia (the Hooters, G. Love and Special Sauce)
NEWS
June 13, 2015 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
TRENTON - State Senate President Stephen Sweeney is facing growing political pressure to allow legislation to proceed that would ask voters in November to decide whether to expand casino gambling beyond Atlantic City. Yet Sweeney (D., Gloucester), who has the authority to decide which bills are posted for a vote, does not appear willing to budge. High-ranking North Jersey Democrats, including Assembly Speaker Vincent Prieto of Hudson County and Senate Budget Chairman Paul Sarlo of Bergen County, support a ballot question this year.
BUSINESS
June 12, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Only in Pennsylvania: Gamblers would not be allowed to register online to open Internet gambling accounts unless they live more than 20 miles away as the crow flies from a bricks-and-mortar casino. Any closer, and they would have to travel to a casino and register in person, under the provisions of a Senate bill in Harrisburg calling for big changes to the state's gambling landscape. The goal is to give the brick-and-mortar casinos a better chance to tap into their local target audience.
NEWS
June 6, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Republican lawmakers in Harrisburg are contemplating a raft of changes to the state's casino gambling law, including one that could benefit Ira Lubert's Valley Forge Casino Resort, as they work through a difficult budget. They are also resurrecting discussion of legalizing Internet gambling, although that appears to be a long shot. "I think the thing driving this, more than anything, is the need for money to settle a budget, where there's not a lot of people who want to vote for a tax increase," State Sen. Tommy Tomlinson (R., Bucks)
NEWS
June 3, 2015 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
TRENTON - New Jersey lawmakers introduced legislation Monday that would ask voters to amend the constitution to allow the state to expand gaming to North Jersey. The amendment, which would permit the establishment of up to three casinos in Essex, Bergen, and Hudson Counties, would require legislative approval before going to voters on the general election ballot. The constitution currently restricts gaming to Atlantic City, where four casinos closed last year amid competition in Pennsylvania, New York, and elsewhere.
BUSINESS
May 29, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mike Bowman, chief executive of Valley Forge Casino Resort, will become president of the Valley Forge Tourism & Convention Board, where he has been chairman, the Upper Merion Township casino announced Wednesday. Bowman, a veteran of the casino industry who got his start in Atlantic City, plans to step down June 15, the announcement said. Until the casino, which is controlled by investor Ira Lubert, replaces Bowman, chief financial officer Alex Figueras and chief marketing officer Jennifer Galle will oversee the property.
NEWS
May 28, 2015 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
Caesars Entertainment promised Stockton University it could resolve a 1988 legal restriction on the former Showboat casino property the school wanted for an Atlantic City campus even as Caesars knew that was unlikely, Stockton contended in court filings last weekend. Stockton bought the property for $18 million in December. Now, in the claims filed Saturday, it is seeking up to $22 million in damages from Caesars as the restriction has stymied the school's plans for the campus. Caesars Entertainment Operating Co. has a pending Chapter 11 bankruptcy case in the U.S. Bankruptcy Court for the Northern District of Illinois, as does the company it set up for the Showboat property, Showboat Atlantic City Propco L.L.C.
NEWS
May 26, 2015 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
PLEASANTVILLE, N.J. - Ramon Melo has finished a day of teaching algebra and calculus at Pleasantville High School, finally using his background as a chemical engineer in the Dominican Republic - not to mention his Spanish - after spending 14 years as a cocktail server for now-closed Showboat. But little more than 12 hours after arriving home from the substitute teaching job, he will be headed for a familiar 4 a.m. shift at Bally's Wild Wild West, slinging drinks for gamblers in the predawn hours.
NEWS
May 24, 2015 | By Ben Finley, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Mercedes Stephens recently hit a jackpot at SugarHouse Casino, her slot machine flashed the faces of 12 cartoon buffaloes - and then it locked up. Stephens, 47, had won more than $1,200, which meant she had to stop playing and sign an IRS tax form that reports her winnings. The process took about five minutes, she said. But the gaming industry warns that the interruption could soon eat away at casino profits and - ironically - billions in gambling tax revenue that flow into Pennsylvania and New Jersey.
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