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NEWS
October 11, 1989 | By David Johnston, Michael E. Ruane and Mike Schurman, Special to The Inquirer Inquirer staff writer John Way Jennings, correspondent Bill Sokolic and the Associated Press contributed to this article
Three top executives of developer Donald Trump's Atlantic City casino empire were killed yesterday when their helicopter lost its main rotor and crashed on the wooded median strip of the Garden State Parkway about two miles north of the Barnegat toll plaza. The helicopter's pilot and co-pilot also were killed in the crash, which occurred shortly before 2 p.m. about 30 miles north of Atlantic City. Witnesses said they heard a loud bang and saw the sleek, Italian-made helicopter's 36-foot main rotor stop spinning and then "pop" off. The craft, flying at 2,800 feet and probably traveling about 150 m.p.h.
BUSINESS
March 17, 2005 | By Suzette Parmley INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Gary DiBartolomeo, the former president of Caesars Atlantic City who was stripped of his casino license four years ago because he lied about his gambling addiction, got his license reinstated and a second chance yesterday. "Thank you very much," said a barely audible DiBartolomeo, after the New Jersey Casino Control Commission, which regulates gambling in Atlantic City, voted, 5-0, in favor of reissuing him a license. With that, DiBartolomeo got up and quickly left the room.
NEWS
August 14, 1991 | By Bill Kent, Special to The Inquirer
The Jovers have 12 minutes in Merv Griffin's Resorts' "Starstruck" show. This doesn't sound like much, especially on those nights, about once a month, when Griffin himself grabs a microphone and makes a surprise appearance. When Griffin appears, the Jovers have a tag line, one of many that have been tried, proved and seasoned from nearly 30 years in front of audiences. Fe (pronounced Fay) Jover halts her nonstop gush of bubbly, British- accented giggles, and says quite seriously, "Merv has asked us to make a special announcement.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 2008 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
You're sitting on the edge of a swimming pool so blue, you imagine you're in the Caribbean. The vivid flowers and aquatic plantings surrounding this pool are so spectacular, they rival those found near Australia's Great Barrier Reef. Now, you close your eyes and savor a meal so satisfying you'd swear you were in Paris. All this after a pedicure so perfect, a facial so cleansing and a massage so soothing, you think maybe you've just died and gone to . . . Atlantic City?
NEWS
December 26, 2008
I TOTALLY AGREE with you about not having the casino built in the Gallery and allowing it to be built on the waterfront. The plans that were shown in the paper for the waterfront casino were beautiful. I can't even imagine putting it in the Gallery. I am wondering if the main reason to put it there is people will have to pay a high price for parking? Renee Towns, Philadelphia
NEWS
April 22, 2010 | By Harris Steinberg
Philadelphia was dealt a bad hand when the Foxwoods casino was proposed for the city's Delaware River waterfront. But with the future of the project in doubt, local leaders have a rare chance to reshape it. Now that Foxwoods' casino license could be revoked and given to another group, city and state officials must acknowledge that plunking down a casino wherever a developer wants it is not wise. We've also learned that casinos designed without comprehensive traffic and land-use planning don't work very well.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 24, 1999 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
When he reteamed with Robert De Niro and Joe Pesci to make Casino in 1995, Martin Scorsese found himself in competition with his past achievements. His incomparably sardonic assessment of the mob in 1990's GoodFellas was rightly regarded as one of his best films. If he didn't match that movie in Casino, Scorsese gave us a dazzling look at the point where money and greed meet sex and need in the Las Vegas of the '70s. De Niro's Sam Rothstein demonstrates such a flair for numbers while running a sports book that the mob chooses him to take control of its operation in Las Vegas.
NEWS
April 11, 2008
THE state Supreme Court has ordered the city to grant zoning to Foxwoods. The court said Foxwoods "spent months working with the city to craft a plan of development that addressed issues of concern to the city and to residents living near the Foxwoods site. " This statement is based on a bald-faced lie. One of the main issues of concern, yet to be addressed, is the social and economic cost of having a casino in the neighborhood. We have asked Gov. Rendell to do his homework by defining the economic and social costs associated with casinos.
NEWS
July 11, 2012 | By Suzette Parmley, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If June revenue numbers released Tuesday by the New Jersey Division of Gaming Enforcement are a barometer of how well a casino will perform in the slower winter months in Atlantic City, then the new Revel is in trouble. June is a peak month at the Jersey Shore resort, and the mega casino generated $14.9 million on total gambling revenue, ranking it 8th among the city's dozen gambling halls for the third consecutive month since it debuted April 2. By comparison, market leader Borgata pulled in $53.3 million last month, about three and a half times more than Revel.
NEWS
August 22, 2012 | By Wayne Parry, Associated Press
ATLANTIC CITY - At first, it seemed like a coincidence, the kind of thing that happens from time to time at a casino, where the same number or same sequence of cards occurs twice in a row. But when the players at an April game of mini-baccarat at the Golden Nugget Atlantic City kept seeing the same sequence of cards dealt, over and over and over again, their eyes grew wide and their bets grew bigger, zooming from $10 a hand to $5,000. Forty-one consecutive winning hands later, the 14 players had racked up more than $1.5 million in winnings - surrounded by casino security convinced they had cheated but unable to prove how. In a lawsuit against a Kansas City playing card manufacturer, the Golden Nugget contends the cards were unshuffled, despite being promised to be preshuffled and ready to use. The April 30 incident was the latest instance of unshuffled decks of cards causing headaches for an Atlantic City casino.
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BUSINESS
October 30, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
At a meeting Tuesday of gambling regulators from around the world, Mayor Nutter urged the Pennsylvania Gaming Control Board to finally vote on the second casino license in Philadelphia. "The record's been closed for some time," said Nutter, referring to public suitability hearings, where applicants made their cases before the board members - which took place eight months ago at the Convention Center. Speaking generally of deliberative bodies, Nutter said, "Taking action is very important.
NEWS
October 30, 2014 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
The collapse of New Jersey's hospitality industry, driven by the closure this year of four casinos in Atlantic City, is one reason the state's economy is not faring as well as the nation's, an economist said Tuesday at a business forum. "It's really a tale of two economies - the national economy vs. the state economy," said Joel Naroff of Naroff Economic Advisors Inc. in Bucks County. "If I had to give the state economy a grade, maybe I'd give it a 60 out of 100. It's not doing too well.
NEWS
October 26, 2014 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
ATLANTIC CITY - A trio of Trump Taj Mahal waitresses - Susan Blight, Patti Pinchock, and Valerie McMorris - have been with the casino since it opened on April 2, 1990. All three said Friday they sense its last days are on the near horizon. "We just feel violated," said Pinchock, 53, of Egg Harbor Township, who held up a sign that read, "Healthcare RIP. " Added McMorris, 45, of Galloway Township: "A Delaware judge, with a stroke of a pen, took away our health-care benefits. Instead of being part of the middle class, we are now the working poor.
NEWS
October 26, 2014 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
TRENTON - New Jersey's candidates for a U.S. Senate seat held their only debate Friday, sparring over issues ranging from the Ebola outbreak to the prospect of a casino in North Jersey. U.S. Sen. Cory A. Booker, a Democrat seeking a full six-year term in the Nov. 4 election, sought to portray Republican Jeff Bell as a tea-party extremist who would block progress in Washington. Bell, a former campaign aide to President Ronald Reagan who was the GOP nominee for Senate in 1978, said Booker would work to advance what he described as President Obama's failed economic policies.
NEWS
October 19, 2014 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
A federal bankruptcy judge on Friday allowed the owners of Atlantic City's bankrupt Trump Taj Mahal Casino Resort to void its contract with its 1,100 union workers. Whether the $15 million in savings will be enough to keep the doors of the troubled casino open is nowhere near a sure bet. In a decision delivered in a Delaware courtroom, Judge Kevin Gross granted a request by the casino's owners, Trump Entertainment Resorts, to end the contract, cutting health and pension benefits.
NEWS
October 14, 2014 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
ATLANTIC CITY - As city police hauled away about two dozen of his casino union brethren in handcuffs at a mass protest last week, longtime Trump Taj Mahal bartender Al Messina couldn't help but wonder aloud: Is this what 24 years comes down to? What happened to the bond between the casino industry and its workers? Messina and about 6,000 employees were part of Atlantic City history on April 2, 1990, when the Taj, then dubbed the "eighth wonder of the world" by founder and former owner Donald Trump, opened.
NEWS
October 14, 2014 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia developer Bart Blatstein said Sunday he and casino architect Paul Steelman had agreed to buy the four-story, 300,000-square-foot, half-empty Caesars Pier shopping center in Atlantic City for a small fraction of its construction cost. A person familiar with the deal said Blatstein and Steelman agreed to pay $2.8 million. That's less than 2 percent of the $200 million-plus that developer Taubman Centers of the Detroit suburbs and other investors plowed into the project in the mid-00s.
NEWS
October 13, 2014 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
ATLANTIC CITY - It was a more optimistic time 11 years ago when David Welsh, a city tree trimmer in search of a house, heard of one about to go on the market and raced over to make an offer. After haggling, Welsh was able to buy the 1925 two-story house just over the Albany Avenue Bridge in Chelsea Heights for $190,000. Now, two years after Hurricane Sandy dumped four feet of water into his carefully furnished house, Welsh, 58, and girlfriend Francine Tiemann, 64, are finally past the trauma of the contractor who left them in the lurch after blowing through $62,000 worth of insurance payments and past the Hail Mary help from the Atlantic City Long Term Recovery Group, which finished the bulk of the rebuilding.
BUSINESS
October 10, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Pennsylvania Gaming Control Board suspended the chief executive of Valley Forge Casino Resort for 15 days for "recklessly" allowing two underage women access to the casino floor in May 2013. The consent order, approved Wednesday at a regular meeting of the gaming board in Harrisburg, also requires the executive, Michael Bowman, to participate in eight hours of training and issue a letter of apology all Valley Forge employees. Bowman will also lose two weeks' pay as a penalty from the casino, Bowman's lawyer, Stephen D. Schrier, of Blank Rome L.L.P., told the board.
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