CollectionsCasino
IN THE NEWS

Casino

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
November 4, 2010 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
ATLANTIC CITY - It looks as if the $2 billion Revel Casino project on the Boardwalk has found a new lifeline. JPMorgan Chase & Co. has a 10 a.m. call with a group of banks Thursday to sell them on the Revel project. This move suggests the development may be close to raising money to complete construction, say gaming analysts. Kevin DeSanctis, Revel Entertainment Group L.L.C.'s chief executive officer, told The Inquirer last week that he was pitching the project to Wall Street banks and was confident he could secure the $1 billion needed to complete the project.
NEWS
October 11, 1989 | By David Johnston, Michael E. Ruane and Mike Schurman, Special to The Inquirer Inquirer staff writer John Way Jennings, correspondent Bill Sokolic and the Associated Press contributed to this article
Three top executives of developer Donald Trump's Atlantic City casino empire were killed yesterday when their helicopter lost its main rotor and crashed on the wooded median strip of the Garden State Parkway about two miles north of the Barnegat toll plaza. The helicopter's pilot and co-pilot also were killed in the crash, which occurred shortly before 2 p.m. about 30 miles north of Atlantic City. Witnesses said they heard a loud bang and saw the sleek, Italian-made helicopter's 36-foot main rotor stop spinning and then "pop" off. The craft, flying at 2,800 feet and probably traveling about 150 m.p.h.
BUSINESS
March 17, 2005 | By Suzette Parmley INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Gary DiBartolomeo, the former president of Caesars Atlantic City who was stripped of his casino license four years ago because he lied about his gambling addiction, got his license reinstated and a second chance yesterday. "Thank you very much," said a barely audible DiBartolomeo, after the New Jersey Casino Control Commission, which regulates gambling in Atlantic City, voted, 5-0, in favor of reissuing him a license. With that, DiBartolomeo got up and quickly left the room.
NEWS
August 14, 1991 | By Bill Kent, Special to The Inquirer
The Jovers have 12 minutes in Merv Griffin's Resorts' "Starstruck" show. This doesn't sound like much, especially on those nights, about once a month, when Griffin himself grabs a microphone and makes a surprise appearance. When Griffin appears, the Jovers have a tag line, one of many that have been tried, proved and seasoned from nearly 30 years in front of audiences. Fe (pronounced Fay) Jover halts her nonstop gush of bubbly, British- accented giggles, and says quite seriously, "Merv has asked us to make a special announcement.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 2008 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
You're sitting on the edge of a swimming pool so blue, you imagine you're in the Caribbean. The vivid flowers and aquatic plantings surrounding this pool are so spectacular, they rival those found near Australia's Great Barrier Reef. Now, you close your eyes and savor a meal so satisfying you'd swear you were in Paris. All this after a pedicure so perfect, a facial so cleansing and a massage so soothing, you think maybe you've just died and gone to . . . Atlantic City?
NEWS
August 19, 2014 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
ATLANTIC CITY - Revel's waning days stand in stark contrast to just over three years ago, when its chief executive at the time, Kevin DeSanctis, wowed everyone at the East Coast Gaming Congress with his vision. Four months before, in early February 2011, Revel had secured $1.15 billion in new financing to finish construction, which had been halted for more than a year by the recession and frozen lending. In April 2010, Morgan Stanley, Revel's original chief financial backer and operator, had decided to pull out of the project, taking a $932 million loss on it, rather than spending the $1 billion that finishing the casino would cost.
NEWS
December 26, 2008
I TOTALLY AGREE with you about not having the casino built in the Gallery and allowing it to be built on the waterfront. The plans that were shown in the paper for the waterfront casino were beautiful. I can't even imagine putting it in the Gallery. I am wondering if the main reason to put it there is people will have to pay a high price for parking? Renee Towns, Philadelphia
NEWS
July 14, 2014 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
ATLANTIC CITY - While the amusement-park sound of slot machines filtered through Trump Plaza on Saturday, the men and women who staff the casino put on their brave faces. While they dealt cards, swept the gaming floor, or emptied trash bins as usual, the crisis in this battered resort had deepened the night before. Owners of Trump Plaza confirmed they plan to close the casino in mid-September and will issue formal layoff notices Monday to about 1,600 employees. "I'm not ready to believe it until I get that notice in my hands, telling me it's time to look for another job," said slot attendant Parimal Mehta, 57, of Egg Harbor Township, who has worked at Trump Plaza for 22 years.
NEWS
April 22, 2010 | By Harris Steinberg
Philadelphia was dealt a bad hand when the Foxwoods casino was proposed for the city's Delaware River waterfront. But with the future of the project in doubt, local leaders have a rare chance to reshape it. Now that Foxwoods' casino license could be revoked and given to another group, city and state officials must acknowledge that plunking down a casino wherever a developer wants it is not wise. We've also learned that casinos designed without comprehensive traffic and land-use planning don't work very well.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 24, 1999 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
When he reteamed with Robert De Niro and Joe Pesci to make Casino in 1995, Martin Scorsese found himself in competition with his past achievements. His incomparably sardonic assessment of the mob in 1990's GoodFellas was rightly regarded as one of his best films. If he didn't match that movie in Casino, Scorsese gave us a dazzling look at the point where money and greed meet sex and need in the Las Vegas of the '70s. De Niro's Sam Rothstein demonstrates such a flair for numbers while running a sports book that the mob chooses him to take control of its operation in Las Vegas.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
August 29, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Pennsylvania Department of Revenue, represented by attorneys from Ballard Spahr L.P., asked a U.S. Bankruptcy Judge in Philadelphia to dismiss or abstain from hearing a lawsuit by the Foxwoods Casino group seeking to retrieve the $50 million license fee Foxwoods paid in 2007. In connection with an April 1 bankruptcy filing, the Foxwoods group sued the state in May. The Pennsylvania Gaming Control Board revoked Foxwoods' license in 2010, and the group lost bids in state court to win back the $50 million.
BUSINESS
August 28, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
The closure of three Atlantic City casinos by mid-September will wipe $2 billion from property-tax values next year, exacerbating the financial plight of the already cash-strapped city, Mayor Don Guardian warned Tuesday. By 2017, Guardian said on a conference call to discuss Atlantic City's way forward as a center of tourism, property values are expected to have fallen as low as $7.5 billion, from $20 billion five years ago. In the short term, Guardian said, the New Jersey Department of Community Affairs has made money "available for some bridge loans to make sure that the city continues functioning with this year's budget because of any concern that we might have that a casino's closing, going bankrupt, might hold off payments.
NEWS
August 27, 2014 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
ATLANTIC CITY - When gambling was being proposed for Atlantic City 38 years ago, most religious denominations opposed casinos. They viewed gambling as a vice that could destroy families and communities. Now, many of the same churches are standing firmly by the casino workers, a number of whom fill their pews on Sundays, who are expected to lose their jobs in massive numbers, starting Labor Day weekend with the closure of the Showboat and Revel. Many houses of worship are offering counseling for the affected workers, increased food pantry hours, or just someone to pray with.
NEWS
August 22, 2014 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
Mark Manzoni, a bartender at the doomed Revel Casino Hotel in Atlantic City, has a manila envelope in his hand and a smile on his face. "I just got a job," the Galloway Township resident says. "My last shift at Revel ends at 8 a.m. on Labor Day, and I go down to Maryland Sept. 2. " Manzoni, 50, was the first to arrive and the first hired during the job fair sponsored Tuesday and Wednesday by the Maryland Live! Casino. With the Atlantic Club already dark and Revel, Showboat, and Trump Plaza scheduled to shut down within weeks, an estimated 8,000 Atlantic City casino workers will have lost their jobs this year.
BUSINESS
August 21, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
A North Jersey business group on Tuesday unveiled a $1.17 billion plan to add two hotels with casino floors and conference facilities to the Meadowlands Sports Complex, which is already home to MetLife Stadium and Meadowlands Racetrack. The Meadowlands Regional Chamber's proposal, which updates a 2011 plan that also included a casino, comes as momentum is building among lawmakers to end Atlantic City's monopoly on casino gambling in New Jersey. "This is not a plan to create a district that competes with Atlantic City," Jim Kirkos, chief executive of the business group, said.
BUSINESS
August 20, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
As painful as the Sept. 2 closure of the Revel casino in Atlantic City will be for the more than 4,000 employees who work there, it could help spur a sale of the $2.4 billion property, a Revel attorney said in bankruptcy court Monday. None of the bidders who submitted bids by the Aug. 4 deadline were willing to operate Revel as it exists and bankroll losses of between $1 million and $2 million a week. "It may be that some of the dust has to settle from our shutdown," John K. Cunningham, a White & Case L.L.P.
NEWS
August 19, 2014 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
ATLANTIC CITY - Revel's waning days stand in stark contrast to just over three years ago, when its chief executive at the time, Kevin DeSanctis, wowed everyone at the East Coast Gaming Congress with his vision. Four months before, in early February 2011, Revel had secured $1.15 billion in new financing to finish construction, which had been halted for more than a year by the recession and frozen lending. In April 2010, Morgan Stanley, Revel's original chief financial backer and operator, had decided to pull out of the project, taking a $932 million loss on it, rather than spending the $1 billion that finishing the casino would cost.
NEWS
August 16, 2014 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
OCEAN CITY - Unrest spurred by a spate of upcoming casino closures in Atlantic City confronted Gov. Christie on Thursday at the Shore, as workers showed up at a town-hall-style event and demanded that Christie take action. Christie, meanwhile, told the crowd in Ocean City that there was a limit to what he could do. "The government can't order private businesses to do things," Christie told those gathered for the event at the Ocean City Music Pier. "And you don't want to live in a world where we do. " At the same time, Christie said his administration was working to find jobs for the soon-to-swell ranks of the unemployed in Atlantic City, where the number of casinos that have closed or are slated to close grew to four this week.
NEWS
August 15, 2014 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
ATLANTIC CITY - Absorbing wave upon wave of bad news about the resort town they are paid to promote, Atlantic City's beleaguered marketers have reached into their quiver to fire back. "Atlantic City Responds to Negative Press with what else, an ad," is how Jeff Guaracino, chief strategist and communications officer with the Atlantic City Alliance, put it Wednesday, a day after the stunned town absorbed the blow of the announcement that the big glass ball-topped Revel would be closing Sept.
NEWS
August 15, 2014 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
ATLANTIC CITY - The 3,200 workers who have made Revel home the last 28 months are hoping against hope that the casino snags a buyer before its targeted Sept. 10 closing to save their jobs and a key piece of Atlantic City's skyline. If the casino gets shuttered, the vast majority of them will be unemployed and thrown into a glutted labor market that will soon include 2,100 workers laid off at Showboat if it, too, doesn't secure a buyer by Aug. 31, and 1,100 at Trump Plaza when that casino closes on Sept.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|