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NEWS
October 11, 1989 | By David Johnston, Michael E. Ruane and Mike Schurman, Special to The Inquirer Inquirer staff writer John Way Jennings, correspondent Bill Sokolic and the Associated Press contributed to this article
Three top executives of developer Donald Trump's Atlantic City casino empire were killed yesterday when their helicopter lost its main rotor and crashed on the wooded median strip of the Garden State Parkway about two miles north of the Barnegat toll plaza. The helicopter's pilot and co-pilot also were killed in the crash, which occurred shortly before 2 p.m. about 30 miles north of Atlantic City. Witnesses said they heard a loud bang and saw the sleek, Italian-made helicopter's 36-foot main rotor stop spinning and then "pop" off. The craft, flying at 2,800 feet and probably traveling about 150 m.p.h.
BUSINESS
March 17, 2005 | By Suzette Parmley INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Gary DiBartolomeo, the former president of Caesars Atlantic City who was stripped of his casino license four years ago because he lied about his gambling addiction, got his license reinstated and a second chance yesterday. "Thank you very much," said a barely audible DiBartolomeo, after the New Jersey Casino Control Commission, which regulates gambling in Atlantic City, voted, 5-0, in favor of reissuing him a license. With that, DiBartolomeo got up and quickly left the room.
NEWS
August 14, 1991 | By Bill Kent, Special to The Inquirer
The Jovers have 12 minutes in Merv Griffin's Resorts' "Starstruck" show. This doesn't sound like much, especially on those nights, about once a month, when Griffin himself grabs a microphone and makes a surprise appearance. When Griffin appears, the Jovers have a tag line, one of many that have been tried, proved and seasoned from nearly 30 years in front of audiences. Fe (pronounced Fay) Jover halts her nonstop gush of bubbly, British- accented giggles, and says quite seriously, "Merv has asked us to make a special announcement.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 2008 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
You're sitting on the edge of a swimming pool so blue, you imagine you're in the Caribbean. The vivid flowers and aquatic plantings surrounding this pool are so spectacular, they rival those found near Australia's Great Barrier Reef. Now, you close your eyes and savor a meal so satisfying you'd swear you were in Paris. All this after a pedicure so perfect, a facial so cleansing and a massage so soothing, you think maybe you've just died and gone to . . . Atlantic City?
NEWS
October 14, 2014 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia developer Bart Blatstein said Sunday he and casino architect Paul Steelman had agreed to buy the four-story, 300,000-square-foot, half-empty Caesars Pier shopping center in Atlantic City for a small fraction of its construction cost. A person familiar with the deal said Blatstein and Steelman agreed to pay $2.8 million. That's less than 2 percent of the $200 million-plus that developer Taubman Centers of the Detroit suburbs and other investors plowed into the project in the mid-00s.
NEWS
October 19, 2014 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
A federal bankruptcy judge on Friday allowed the owners of Atlantic City's bankrupt Trump Taj Mahal Casino Resort to void its contract with its 1,100 union workers. Whether the $15 million in savings will be enough to keep the doors of the troubled casino open is nowhere near a sure bet. In a decision delivered in a Delaware courtroom, Judge Kevin Gross granted a request by the casino's owners, Trump Entertainment Resorts, to end the contract, cutting health and pension benefits.
NEWS
December 26, 2008
I TOTALLY AGREE with you about not having the casino built in the Gallery and allowing it to be built on the waterfront. The plans that were shown in the paper for the waterfront casino were beautiful. I can't even imagine putting it in the Gallery. I am wondering if the main reason to put it there is people will have to pay a high price for parking? Renee Towns, Philadelphia
NEWS
August 22, 2012 | By Wayne Parry, Associated Press
ATLANTIC CITY - At first, it seemed like a coincidence, the kind of thing that happens from time to time at a casino, where the same number or same sequence of cards occurs twice in a row. But when the players at an April game of mini-baccarat at the Golden Nugget Atlantic City kept seeing the same sequence of cards dealt, over and over and over again, their eyes grew wide and their bets grew bigger, zooming from $10 a hand to $5,000. Forty-one consecutive winning hands later, the 14 players had racked up more than $1.5 million in winnings - surrounded by casino security convinced they had cheated but unable to prove how. In a lawsuit against a Kansas City playing card manufacturer, the Golden Nugget contends the cards were unshuffled, despite being promised to be preshuffled and ready to use. The April 30 incident was the latest instance of unshuffled decks of cards causing headaches for an Atlantic City casino.
NEWS
May 18, 2007 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
ATLANTIC CITY - Last year's tan had long faded away, and the waves were brisk with a pre-season chill. But finally, after the cool intervening months since last summer, the Pier Shops at Caesars is heating up. On its third-floor restaurant concourse, you can sit back in a wooden chaise-longue, grab a cocktail, and actually put your toes in the sand of the faux-beach that lines the windowed hall. Watching the waves crack below the Pier onto the beach from the comfort of this seaside mall was about the closest I've gotten to imagining a year-round summer.
NEWS
April 22, 2010 | By Harris Steinberg
Philadelphia was dealt a bad hand when the Foxwoods casino was proposed for the city's Delaware River waterfront. But with the future of the project in doubt, local leaders have a rare chance to reshape it. Now that Foxwoods' casino license could be revoked and given to another group, city and state officials must acknowledge that plunking down a casino wherever a developer wants it is not wise. We've also learned that casinos designed without comprehensive traffic and land-use planning don't work very well.
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NEWS
October 19, 2014 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
A federal bankruptcy judge on Friday allowed the owners of Atlantic City's bankrupt Trump Taj Mahal Casino Resort to void its contract with its 1,100 union workers. Whether the $15 million in savings will be enough to keep the doors of the troubled casino open is nowhere near a sure bet. In a decision delivered in a Delaware courtroom, Judge Kevin Gross granted a request by the casino's owners, Trump Entertainment Resorts, to end the contract, cutting health and pension benefits.
NEWS
October 14, 2014 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
ATLANTIC CITY - As city police hauled away about two dozen of his casino union brethren in handcuffs at a mass protest last week, longtime Trump Taj Mahal bartender Al Messina couldn't help but wonder aloud: Is this what 24 years comes down to? What happened to the bond between the casino industry and its workers? Messina and about 6,000 employees were part of Atlantic City history on April 2, 1990, when the Taj, then dubbed the "eighth wonder of the world" by founder and former owner Donald Trump, opened.
NEWS
October 14, 2014 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia developer Bart Blatstein said Sunday he and casino architect Paul Steelman had agreed to buy the four-story, 300,000-square-foot, half-empty Caesars Pier shopping center in Atlantic City for a small fraction of its construction cost. A person familiar with the deal said Blatstein and Steelman agreed to pay $2.8 million. That's less than 2 percent of the $200 million-plus that developer Taubman Centers of the Detroit suburbs and other investors plowed into the project in the mid-00s.
NEWS
October 13, 2014 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
ATLANTIC CITY - It was a more optimistic time 11 years ago when David Welsh, a city tree trimmer in search of a house, heard of one about to go on the market and raced over to make an offer. After haggling, Welsh was able to buy the 1925 two-story house just over the Albany Avenue Bridge in Chelsea Heights for $190,000. Now, two years after Hurricane Sandy dumped four feet of water into his carefully furnished house, Welsh, 58, and girlfriend Francine Tiemann, 64, are finally past the trauma of the contractor who left them in the lurch after blowing through $62,000 worth of insurance payments and past the Hail Mary help from the Atlantic City Long Term Recovery Group, which finished the bulk of the rebuilding.
BUSINESS
October 10, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Pennsylvania Gaming Control Board suspended the chief executive of Valley Forge Casino Resort for 15 days for "recklessly" allowing two underage women access to the casino floor in May 2013. The consent order, approved Wednesday at a regular meeting of the gaming board in Harrisburg, also requires the executive, Michael Bowman, to participate in eight hours of training and issue a letter of apology all Valley Forge employees. Bowman will also lose two weeks' pay as a penalty from the casino, Bowman's lawyer, Stephen D. Schrier, of Blank Rome L.L.P., told the board.
BUSINESS
October 10, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
For all the maligning that the design of Atlantic City's Revel Casino Hotel has endured, fixing it is not as hard as many think. That's the view of Paul C. Steelman, a top casino architect worldwide and a native of Longport, N.J., who got his start in Atlantic City designing the original Golden Nugget for Steve Wynn. Many of the problems at Revel, whose sale to Brookfield Asset Management Inc. was approved by a bankruptcy judge Tuesday, have relatively easy fixes, Steelman said Wednesday.
BUSINESS
September 29, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Atlantic City casino hotels went bankrupt in the past - no uncommon occurrence - suppliers could count on getting 60 percent to 80 percent of what they were owed. Like much else in Atlantic City, that has changed. "There's no reason to believe we'll ever get very much of it at all," said Nelson Dilg, whose Egg Harbor City, N.J., company cleans kitchen hoods and grease traps, and has experienced earlier rounds of casino bankruptcies. The Atlantic Club, Revel AC Inc., and Trump Entertainment Resorts Inc., the three Atlantic City casino operators that have filed for bankruptcy protection since last November, owe Dilg's Nelbud Services Group Inc. $200,000.
BUSINESS
September 22, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Atlantic City has become a place where hedge-fund managers go to lose their shirts. Three of the four Atlantic City casinos that closed this year (or four of five, if Taj Mahal closes in November) were controlled by hedge funds that suffered deep - but difficult to measure - losses. By contrast, operators with deep experience with casinos bought Resorts and the former Trump Marina (now Golden Nugget) in 2010 and 2011. Both casinos are showing signs of turning the corner - although the Atlantic City market overall remains far from settled.
BUSINESS
September 18, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pennsylvania's 12 casinos won $66.4 million from poker, craps, and other table games players last month, 4.6 percent more than in the same period last year. But results were split on the basis of individual casinos. Half - led by Sands Casino Resort Bethlehem with a 20 percent increase - were up, and half were down. The same was true locally. Parx Casino and SugarHouse Casino recorded gains, while Harrah's Philadelphia and Valley Forge posted lower table games revenues. Aggregate table games revenue at the four Philadelphia-area casinos was up 1.7 percent, to $27.6 million from $27.3 million.
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