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NEWS
October 11, 1989 | By David Johnston, Michael E. Ruane and Mike Schurman, Special to The Inquirer Inquirer staff writer John Way Jennings, correspondent Bill Sokolic and the Associated Press contributed to this article
Three top executives of developer Donald Trump's Atlantic City casino empire were killed yesterday when their helicopter lost its main rotor and crashed on the wooded median strip of the Garden State Parkway about two miles north of the Barnegat toll plaza. The helicopter's pilot and co-pilot also were killed in the crash, which occurred shortly before 2 p.m. about 30 miles north of Atlantic City. Witnesses said they heard a loud bang and saw the sleek, Italian-made helicopter's 36-foot main rotor stop spinning and then "pop" off. The craft, flying at 2,800 feet and probably traveling about 150 m.p.h.
BUSINESS
March 17, 2005 | By Suzette Parmley INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Gary DiBartolomeo, the former president of Caesars Atlantic City who was stripped of his casino license four years ago because he lied about his gambling addiction, got his license reinstated and a second chance yesterday. "Thank you very much," said a barely audible DiBartolomeo, after the New Jersey Casino Control Commission, which regulates gambling in Atlantic City, voted, 5-0, in favor of reissuing him a license. With that, DiBartolomeo got up and quickly left the room.
NEWS
August 14, 1991 | By Bill Kent, Special to The Inquirer
The Jovers have 12 minutes in Merv Griffin's Resorts' "Starstruck" show. This doesn't sound like much, especially on those nights, about once a month, when Griffin himself grabs a microphone and makes a surprise appearance. When Griffin appears, the Jovers have a tag line, one of many that have been tried, proved and seasoned from nearly 30 years in front of audiences. Fe (pronounced Fay) Jover halts her nonstop gush of bubbly, British- accented giggles, and says quite seriously, "Merv has asked us to make a special announcement.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 2008 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
You're sitting on the edge of a swimming pool so blue, you imagine you're in the Caribbean. The vivid flowers and aquatic plantings surrounding this pool are so spectacular, they rival those found near Australia's Great Barrier Reef. Now, you close your eyes and savor a meal so satisfying you'd swear you were in Paris. All this after a pedicure so perfect, a facial so cleansing and a massage so soothing, you think maybe you've just died and gone to . . . Atlantic City?
NEWS
December 26, 2008
I TOTALLY AGREE with you about not having the casino built in the Gallery and allowing it to be built on the waterfront. The plans that were shown in the paper for the waterfront casino were beautiful. I can't even imagine putting it in the Gallery. I am wondering if the main reason to put it there is people will have to pay a high price for parking? Renee Towns, Philadelphia
BUSINESS
February 11, 2013 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
Developer Ken Goldenberg is hard to pin down. Like an object in perpetual motion, he pivots from one real estate project to another on any given day.   He has eight significant developments going on throughout the region, including high-rise student housing next to Temple University, luxury carriage homes behind Haverford College, and a mixed-use project in the Graduate Hospital area. But one project clearly has the head of the Blue Bell-based Goldenberg Group excited.
NEWS
April 22, 2010 | By Harris Steinberg
Philadelphia was dealt a bad hand when the Foxwoods casino was proposed for the city's Delaware River waterfront. But with the future of the project in doubt, local leaders have a rare chance to reshape it. Now that Foxwoods' casino license could be revoked and given to another group, city and state officials must acknowledge that plunking down a casino wherever a developer wants it is not wise. We've also learned that casinos designed without comprehensive traffic and land-use planning don't work very well.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 24, 1999 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
When he reteamed with Robert De Niro and Joe Pesci to make Casino in 1995, Martin Scorsese found himself in competition with his past achievements. His incomparably sardonic assessment of the mob in 1990's GoodFellas was rightly regarded as one of his best films. If he didn't match that movie in Casino, Scorsese gave us a dazzling look at the point where money and greed meet sex and need in the Las Vegas of the '70s. De Niro's Sam Rothstein demonstrates such a flair for numbers while running a sports book that the mob chooses him to take control of its operation in Las Vegas.
NEWS
April 11, 2008
THE state Supreme Court has ordered the city to grant zoning to Foxwoods. The court said Foxwoods "spent months working with the city to craft a plan of development that addressed issues of concern to the city and to residents living near the Foxwoods site. " This statement is based on a bald-faced lie. One of the main issues of concern, yet to be addressed, is the social and economic cost of having a casino in the neighborhood. We have asked Gov. Rendell to do his homework by defining the economic and social costs associated with casinos.
NEWS
July 11, 2012 | By Suzette Parmley, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If June revenue numbers released Tuesday by the New Jersey Division of Gaming Enforcement are a barometer of how well a casino will perform in the slower winter months in Atlantic City, then the new Revel is in trouble. June is a peak month at the Jersey Shore resort, and the mega casino generated $14.9 million on total gambling revenue, ranking it 8th among the city's dozen gambling halls for the third consecutive month since it debuted April 2. By comparison, market leader Borgata pulled in $53.3 million last month, about three and a half times more than Revel.
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NEWS
November 21, 2014
THANK YOU to the 700-plus people who showed up at Stella Maris Hall to make their feelings clearly known about the very negative prospect of a casino at 10th and Packer. The meeting was hugely united in opposition to a local casino despite some intimidation and a few "planted" speakers who were in attendance to arouse discord against the community leaders who have devoted their time and energy from day one to fight this deadly project. We apologize to everyone who reported feeling intimidated - however, we purposely chose not to limit the audience or the speakers, feeling that an open meeting was more transparent and honest.
BUSINESS
November 21, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Valley Forge Casino Resort has had a tough time before the Pennsylvania Gaming Control Board in the last 12 months. The casino, backed by investor Ira Lubert, was fined a total of $200,000 Wednesday for two separate sets of violations, $50,000 for four episodes of underage gambling, and $150,000 for failing to properly submit promotions for regulatory review. The total matches a $200,000 fine against it last November for violating rules on special offers to attract customers.
NEWS
November 21, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker and Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writers
Brookfield Asset Management is dropping its plan to buy Atlantic City's Revel Hotel Casino for $110 million, company spokesman Andrew Willis said Wednesday. The deal fell apart over how much Brookfield would have to pay in fixed costs to the owners of the $129 million utility plant next door that chills water for air-conditioning, provides hot water, and distributes electricity to the $2.4 billion Revel, sources said. The sale of Revel, which closed Sept. 2, putting more than 3,000 people of out of work, was expected to be completed by the end of this year.
BUSINESS
November 20, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Here's the quick read on why the Pennsylvania Gaming Control Board chose Live! Hotel & Casino in South Philadelphia for Philadelphia's second casino, based on a document just posted on the board's website. The pitch by Live's backers - Cordish Cos. and Greenwood Gaming & Entertainment Inc. - that they could tap into the millions of annual visitors to sporting events and concerts at the stadium complex was convincing. "The board finds the synergy between gambling and entertainment at a casino with the sports and concert enthusiast visiting the more than 400 stadium area events per year presents an opportunity for marketing the stadium/casino area into a 365-day-per-year attraction with minimal negative impact on the surrounding areas," the document, known as an adjudication, said.
NEWS
November 20, 2014
EIGHT YEARS ago, the Pennsylvania Gaming Control Board awarded two licenses for Philadelphia casinos. The first, SugarHouse, opened on Delaware Avenue four years later. We all know what happened to the second: Foxwoods was delayed and delayed until it no longer became economically viable, and almost four years to the day of granting Foxwoods a license, the gaming board revoked it. Then began the long, slow process of awarding that second license to someone else. Yesterday, the board ended the suspense when it announced that the second will go to Live!
NEWS
November 20, 2014 | By Tricia L. Nadolny and Chris Hepp, Inquirer Staff Writers
From his barbershop at Seventh and Bigler Streets, Darin Capo has seen all the concrete giants rise - the Wells Fargo Center in 1996, Lincoln Financial Field in 2003, Citizens Bank Park in 2004 - and worried how each would affect the neighborhood. When a customer stopped by Tuesday to say a new neighbor, a $425 million casino, had just gotten the go-ahead to move in, Capo was struck with déjà vu. But also with hope - that it would be good for business despite the mixed response from the men who sit in his barber's chair.
NEWS
November 20, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker and Tricia L. Nadolny, Inquirer Staff Writers
Convinced that a stadium-area casino would draw sports fans, and certain that casino gamblers want to arrive by car, the Pennsylvania Gaming Control Board on Tuesday awarded Philadelphia's second casino license to Live! Hotel & Casino. The Gaming Board found that "the synergy between gambling and entertainment at a casino" with "the more than 400 stadium-area events per year" could create a year-round attraction at the sports complex, according to a filing that explained the board's selection.
NEWS
November 20, 2014 | BY CHRIS BRENNAN, JENNY DeHUFF & DAVID GAMBACORTA, Daily News Staff Writers brennac@phillynews.com, 215-854-5973
THERE IS one safe bet for a new casino license holder in Philadelphia: Politicians, neighbors and people who applied for but didn't win the license may try to stop the project from going forward. That may be the immediate future for the investors behind Live! Hotel & Casino, which won the city's second gaming license yesterday in a vote by the state Gaming Control Board. That project is a partnership between Greenwood Racing Inc., which runs Parx Casino in Bensalem, and the Cordish Co., which owns a casino in Maryland and Xfinity Live!
BUSINESS
November 19, 2014 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
If, as expected, the Pennsylvania Gaming Control Board awards a second Philadelphia casino license Tuesday, applicants who are turned down can appeal directly to the Pennsylvania Supreme Court. But if the past is any guide, their chances of success are at best slim. Since the onset of casino gambling in Pennsylvania in late 2006, business groups have competed fiercely to win the approval of the Gaming Control Board. And a half-dozen applicants who have been denied licenses have asked the Supreme Court to reverse the decision.
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