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NEWS
July 11, 2012 | By Suzette Parmley, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If June revenue numbers released Tuesday by the New Jersey Division of Gaming Enforcement are a barometer of how well a casino will perform in the slower winter months in Atlantic City, then the new Revel is in trouble. June is a peak month at the Jersey Shore resort, and the mega casino generated $14.9 million on total gambling revenue, ranking it 8th among the city's dozen gambling halls for the third consecutive month since it debuted April 2. By comparison, market leader Borgata pulled in $53.3 million last month, about three and a half times more than Revel.
NEWS
August 22, 2012 | By Wayne Parry, Associated Press
ATLANTIC CITY - At first, it seemed like a coincidence, the kind of thing that happens from time to time at a casino, where the same number or same sequence of cards occurs twice in a row. But when the players at an April game of mini-baccarat at the Golden Nugget Atlantic City kept seeing the same sequence of cards dealt, over and over and over again, their eyes grew wide and their bets grew bigger, zooming from $10 a hand to $5,000. Forty-one consecutive winning hands later, the 14 players had racked up more than $1.5 million in winnings - surrounded by casino security convinced they had cheated but unable to prove how. In a lawsuit against a Kansas City playing card manufacturer, the Golden Nugget contends the cards were unshuffled, despite being promised to be preshuffled and ready to use. The April 30 incident was the latest instance of unshuffled decks of cards causing headaches for an Atlantic City casino.
NEWS
October 6, 2008
THE casino now planned for the Gallery will poison Chinese minds and rob their souls. As a Chinatown resident, I know that, while most people are debating the economic and environmental issues of Foxwoods moving to Center City, I would like to point out some less visible matters that may affect the people living and working nearby in Chinatown. Imagine 50 buses and 20,000 gamblers coming off I-95's Callowhill exit going through Chinatown on 10th Street every day. Imagine drunken gamblers who lost money staggering out of the casino at 2 in the morning looking for a public toilet.
NEWS
June 12, 1986 | By Carolyn Acker, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
The Casino Control Commission voted 4-1 yesterday to renew the license for Trump's Castle Hotel & Casino after determining that owner Donald J. Trump had made only "minimally adequate effort" toward fulfilling road-improvement obligations in the Atlantic City marina area. The commission renewed the license on the condition that Trump must approach the state immediately to negotiate modifications in a 1984 road plan that the developer is challenging in court. Trump's refusal to pay for the roadwork, which he says is unnecessary, had been the only obstacle standing in the way of relicensing.
NEWS
December 13, 2007
ITHANK Daily News writer Chris Brennan for his Nov. 6 remarks on "Radio Times. " He succinctly stated that most people don't oppose casinos - they just don't want them across the street from their homes. We want responsible waterfront development. We want jobs. But the lack of a democratic, open and rational process of site selection for the Philadelphia casinos has resulted in the current circumstances. We are all suffering the consequences of applicants who will say anything just to get in the ground, including grossly misrepresenting the merits of their projects, or even their feasibility at their current locations.
NEWS
June 16, 2009
SOME GROUP that claims to speak for everyone from Chinatown is protesting casinos because they fear addiction to gambling. Are they saying people in Chinatown must be protected from themselves because they aren't strong enough to take responsibility for their own actions? If this is so, shouldn't they be protesting the stores that sell blunts and 40s of malt beverages in Chinatown? And don't forget all the shops that sell unhealthy Chinese food with all that pork and sauces and MSG. If you want to protest, be inclusive of all unhealthy activities.
NEWS
March 1, 1992 | By Donald D. Groff, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
What can you tell us about a new casino resort on an Indian reservation in Connecticut? S.G., Bensalem The casino is the Foxwoods High Stakes Bingo & Casino in Ledyard, Conn., operated by the Mashantucket Pequot tribe. It opened last month and became the East Coast's first casino outside Atlantic City. Besides bingo, it offers craps, poker, blackjack and roulette. Slot-machine betting is not allowed because it is illegal in Connecticut. However, the casino does have some video slot machines that don't take or give money, anticipating the day when the economically depressed state authorizes slot betting.
BUSINESS
February 11, 2013 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
Developer Ken Goldenberg is hard to pin down. Like an object in perpetual motion, he pivots from one real estate project to another on any given day.   He has eight significant developments going on throughout the region, including high-rise student housing next to Temple University, luxury carriage homes behind Haverford College, and a mixed-use project in the Graduate Hospital area. But one project clearly has the head of the Blue Bell-based Goldenberg Group excited.
BUSINESS
December 10, 2004 | By Henry J. Holcomb INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Once upon a time, it was to be a glittering cinema and entertainment center, perched atop a 12-story parking garage overlooking the Vine Street Expressway. At other times, the site was to be a hotel. Or a health-care complex. Or a pharmaceutical company headquarters. Or the entertainment and parking annex of a Phillies ballpark. Or a place called "News Town" that would house the city's two major newspapers. All of these ideas grew into serious proposals that seemed workable for a time.
NEWS
October 8, 2008 | By HARRIS M. STEINBERG
COMMUNITY GROUPS and city officials will meet tomorrow night to discuss the prospect of a casino coming to Market East. While some members of the community will argue "not in my backyard," and public officials will listen to community concerns and propose solutions, all will try to grapple with the uncertainty that comes with large-scale development. This is a familiar scenario, especially to those who worked to develop the Civic Vision for the Central Delaware, where the siting of two casinos threatened to derail the 13-month process completed in November that engaged more than 4,000 Philadelphians.
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