FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
December 13, 1999 | by Christine Bahls , Daily News Staff Writer Staff writer Gloria Campisi contributed to this report
For years, the 80,000-plus bodies lay buried in Odd Fellows Cemetery in the area of 23rd and Edgley streets. More than 40 years ago, their slumber was disturbed when many of the early Philadelphians were removed to make way for the Raymond Rosen housing project and its 1,122 low-income units. Well, not everyone was moved. Seems like whoever removed them forgot a few people. For the past four years - since the overhaul of the housing project began - workers have come into contact with those left behind.
NEWS
May 15, 1987 | By Christine M. Johnson, Special to The Inquirer
Dozens of relatives and friends looked on in horror as the casket bearing the body of Erwin Duchovnay tilted on its faulty lowering device, popping the lid open during January funeral services, according to a civil suit filed this week in Chester County Court. The suit, filed by Minna C. Duchovnay of Devon, the widow, says that services were delayed about 50 minutes, which added to the confusion because several late-arriving mourners were unable to find the Duchovnay grave and ended up at the wrong services in another part of the cemetery in Trevose, Bucks County.
NEWS
April 24, 1995 | By Jeffrey Fleishman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In a morning of broken clouds, Jannie Coverdale picked out a casket for her grandsons. The Coverdale family walked up a straight brick path and pulled open the heavy glass door of the Temple & Son Funeral Home yesterday. There was the scent of the yellow roses rising from a blue vase, and a stone carving of St. Francis of Assisi looked down, solemn in a dim light. In white letters against black felt, there were five other names, all victims twisted together in heartbreak with Aaron and Elijah Coverdale, who died in the American Kids Day Care center when a massive car bomb tore open the federal office building here while they were eating breakfast Wednesday morning.
NEWS
January 11, 2003 | By Leonard Pitts Jr
If you ever saw that picture of Emmett Till, you never forgot it. Not the one that shows a handsome brown teen-ager, hat tipped up slightly off his forehead. Not, in other words, the before picture. No, I'm talking about the picture that was taken after. After he went down from Chicago to visit family in Mississippi in the late summer of 1955. After he accepted a schoolboy dare to flirt with a white woman working behind the counter of the general store. After he called her "baby," and allegedly gave a wolf whistle.
NEWS
August 19, 2009 | By KITTY CAPARELLA, caparek@phillynews.com 215-854-5880
The mourners knew it wasn't Tex. Nearly everyone who passed the silver casket at Tindley Temple United Methodist Church yesterday morning whispered to each other. That's not Tex, they said. But the corpse was wearing his blue suit and black boots. The late Kenneth "Tex" Roberts, 80, who died Monday of a heart attack, was a jovial, mustached, retired tractor-trailer driver who loved to tell jokes, play cards and help people when they were down. On Monday night, Roberts' wife, Janie Holsey, and others went to check the body at James L. Hawkins Funeral Home, at 1640 Federal St., and told a female employee: "This is not my husband.
NEWS
September 1, 1987 | By ANN GERHART, Daily News Staff Writer
It was a white casket, heartbreakingly small, that held Nolan Robertson- Deal, the 2-year-old who slipped through an open manhole into a swirling sewer and away from his family forever. Behind that casket, hundreds of the people Nolan had touched filled the Janes United Methodist Church in Germantown yesterday and tried to gather comfort from the music and the words of the clergy. His mother, Margaret Robertson, sat calmly in the front row, facing a picture of her only child. "Death has no dominion over memories, and death has no dominion over the influence of good that Nolan had," said the Rev. Stephen J. Gibson during a noon ceremony full of memories of the boy. A member of the church choir sang a solemn version of "Jesus Loves Me," that simple statement of faith all Sunday-school-going children learn as soon as they can talk.
BUSINESS
January 12, 2010 | By Bob Fernandez INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
One of the nation's biggest coffin companies is buying industrial-equipment maker K-Tron International Inc. of Pitman for $435 million. The deal announced yesterday should give Hillenbrand Inc. of Indiana, whose products include Batesville-branded caskets, new life outside the flat-growth death-care industry. Hillenbrand will acquire K-Tron for $150 a share in cash. K-Tron's stock soared $34.77 to $148.29 on the news. Kenneth Camp, chief executive officer and president at Hillenbrand, said K-Tron was a "terrific company with a great record and was very well-managed.
NEWS
October 24, 1995 | By Glenn Burkins, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The people of Ajenngano village weren't embarrassed by the unusual burial they planned for their recently departed chief. But some of the village elders, after thoughtful deliberation, decided that folks in the United States just wouldn't understand. So when an outsider asked for permission to attend and photograph the interment, authorities answered with a resounding "no. " It's not every day, after all, that a man is sent to his grave in a wooden coffin carved in the shape of a five-foot eagle.
NEWS
August 31, 1994 | By Sergio R. Bustos, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Hoisted above the shoulders of the six pallbearers, the casket containing Moises DeJesus was borne out of Christ and St. Ambrose Episcopal Church and into the bright sunlight of Venango Street. Outside the old church in North Philadelphia, hundreds of people began filling the block yesterday morning, forming a procession behind the casket of DeJesus, 30, who relatives and neighbors say was beaten to death by police last week. The crowd swelled to as many as 500 as mourners marched down Venango and turned onto Sixth Street, then onto Tioga.
NEWS
December 16, 1993 | By Susan Caba, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Louise Purdy thought she was praying over the body of her son, a victim of AIDS, during a closed-casket service in November 1988 at Price Funeral Home in West Philadelphia. That casket turned out to be empty. Calvin Purdy's body was in a hearse outside, because funeral director John M. Price did not want the body of an AIDS victim inside his facility. Yesterday, a Philadelphia Common Pleas Court jury awarded Louise Purdy $75,000, for the pain and suffering caused by that switch, plus $100,000 in punitive damages.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 4, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Peter H. Gers, 94, of Ambler, a longtime funeral director who was present at the 1962 canonical inspection of Bishop John Neumann's remains prior to the future saint's beatification, has died. Mr. Gers died at Dock Terrace in Lansdale on Saturday, May 30, due to complications from a fall. He first worked for the Harold B. Mulligan Funeral Home in Philadelphia. In 1947, he opened his own funeral parlor in Olney, and then moved to East Oak Lane. Mr. Gers sold the property in 1989 and moved to Ambler, taking a job as a funeral director at the Anton B. Urban Funeral Home.
NEWS
October 23, 2014 | BY JASON NARK, Daily News Staff Writer narkj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5916
TINDLEY TEMPLE United Methodist Church's stained-glass windows vibrated around Kyrell Tyler's casket as hundreds of dirt bikes, ATVs and motorcycles revved outside on Broad Street yesterday, ready to roll for one of their own. Tyler, 23, a well-known stunt rider known as "DirtbikeRell" on various social-media sites, was shot and killed on Oct. 14. His body was found in a Chevy Monte Carlo near 60th Street and Greenway Avenue in Southwest Philadelphia....
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 2014 | By Sally Friedman, For The Inquirer
From the time they were teenagers, triplets Adam, Brian, and Jonathon knew the envelope was always there on the desk. "Everything you need to know is in there," their father, owner of Joseph Levine & Sons Funeral Home, would tell them before he left for a trip. "If I don't come back, you'll know what to do. " "We all understood that our father needed to do that because that's the kind of man he is. Totally responsible, totally committed, not just to his business, but to us," said Brian.
NEWS
December 8, 2013 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
Standing at the pulpit, Mariah Loper recalled, in a small shaking voice, the day she went to the airport to greet her older cousin, a Marine fighting in Afghanistan. Her hero was finally home. "I still remember holding up the 'Welcome Home Timmy' sign," Mariah Loper said Friday, looking down at the casket draped in an American flag. "I cherished every moment we spent together. . . . He made us so proud, and he will always be our Marine. " Timothy Loper Jr. was laid to rest Friday after a packed funeral attended by family, friends, community members, and fellow servicemen.
NEWS
December 7, 2013 | By Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA For more than a century, the plot of land centered at 24th and Diamond Streets served as the final resting place for a Civil War hero, a labor leader, and about 85,000 Philadelphians. But in 1950, city officials announced plans to move the denizens of the Odd Fellows Cemetery elsewhere in the city to make room for the Raymond Rosen housing project and a new public school. The Rosen project is long gone, torn down in 1995 after years of crime, overcrowding, and disrepair, but the William Dick Elementary School, built in 1954, has remained - and so, apparently, have some of those interred at the Odd Fellows Cemetery, which opened in 1849.
NEWS
December 5, 2013
NORTH PHILA. - Philadelphia Water Department workers unearthed several caskets and, possibly, headstones behind a North Philadelphia school Wednesday, police said. Shortly after 2 p.m., crews discovered the caskets while excavating a playground behind the William Dicks Elementary School, in the 2400 block of West Diamond Street, police said. There was no immediate word on whether human remains were found. The site until 1950 was the Odd Fellows Cemetery. After the city obtained the property, all the remains were supposedly moved to two other Odd Fellows cemeteries.
NEWS
August 25, 2013 | BY DAVID GAMBACORTA, Daily News Staff Writer gambacd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5994
IN CARRIE Minney's dream, she was on the phone, and someone was saying that her daughter was still alive. It had to have been a dream, because Minney buried her daughter, Sharolyn Jackson, in New Jersey on Aug. 3, about a week after she was found dead at 59th and Spruce streets in West Philadelphia. Family members were at the funeral. They saw Jackson in the casket. Talked about how sad it was and, as an afterthought, how her nose looked somewhat different. Turns out, they were on to something.
NEWS
August 25, 2013 | By Theodore Schleifer, Inquirer Staff Writer
At an open-casket funeral in the Campbell Funeral Chapel in Trenton this month, more than 50 friends and relatives gathered to say goodbye to Sharolyn Jackson. She had lived a troubled life, but the service and nearby burial celebrated the people-loving, 50-year-old mother of five. Except the woman in the casket wasn't her. She had the same forehead, figure, and hands, and they could have been sisters. But they weren't even related. To this day, no one knows who was lowered into the ground Aug. 3 at Colonial Memorial Park in Hamilton, N.J. The mistake was uncovered almost two weeks later, when Jackson was spotted at a shopping mall by a person associated with the social-service agency that saw to her needs, her family said.
NEWS
June 8, 2013 | By Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - Close to 100 current and former senators and members of Congress lined up on the Senate floor to pay final respects Thursday to New Jersey Sen. Frank R. Lautenberg, who died Monday. The gathering, dotted by members of both parties and two top administration officials, stretched through the doors into the hallways outside. Lautenberg, who at 89 was the Senate's oldest member and its last World War II veteran, will be buried Friday at Arlington National Cemetery. Sens.
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