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FOOD
December 11, 2015 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, Inquirer Food Editor
Not so long ago, the casserole was the MVP in the American dinner lineup, an easy and economical supper without fuss. Tuna noodle, chicken and rice, ground beef and macaroni, these were the staples of many childhood dinners. But in this generation, many children have no familiarity with this comfort-food genre. "All the kids were asking, 'What's a casserole?' " said Susan Munafo, a volunteer at after-school cooking class at William Loesche Elementary in Northeast Philadelphia.
FOOD
October 7, 1992 | By Marcia Cone and Thelma Snyder, FOR THE INQUIRER
Just out of curiosity, we checked the indexes of a variety of cookbooks in search of the word casserole. We found fewer than five entries. This state of affairs is probably best summed up by Michael McLaughlin, author of The Back of the Box Cookbook (Simon & Schuster), who says that most people "greet the casserole with suspicion. " Perhaps it is the image of a goopy mass of who-knows-what lying beneath a steaming surface that causes cookbook authors and others to eschew the name casserole.
FOOD
November 5, 1986 | By JACQUELINE WIRTH, Special to the Daily News
The next few weeks will be busy for many people so put your freezer to good use; get a head start on family meals as well as food for special occasions. The freezer can also preserve leftovers after a holiday meal. If you're preparing family favorites such as chili, spaghetti sauce, stews or soups, double the recipes and freeze the extra. Cook the food until nearly done so it will have a good texture when it is thawed and reheated. There are a couple of caveats. Garlic gets stronger during freezing, especially if it is raw. Onion tends to lose flavor; saute it before adding to dish helps the problem.
FOOD
December 22, 2011
This is an excerpt from Craig LaBan's online chat.   Craig: I did a fair bit of casserole-dish cooking these last couple of weeks, including one of my favorite dishes for leftover brisket: shepherd's pie. All I do is crumble about 1-2 pounds of leftover brisket into a sauté pan with carrots, parsnips, leeks, peas, and garlic. Add half a can of tomato paste, a cup of white wine (or more, just to moisten), then layer into a casserole pan below some fresh mashed potatoes (about 2 pounds worth)
NEWS
June 9, 2013
D EAR ABBY: I host all of the holiday parties and dinner parties for my family. Whenever I have my parents over, my father insists on helping himself to the top layer of every casserole. He'll scrape all the cheese off the potatoes, the crunchy onion topping off the green bean casserole, etc., leaving just the bare vegetables for everyone else. I have asked Dad not to do it because it is inconsiderate of the other guests. I can see people are bothered by it, so now they make a beeline to the buffet so they can beat him to it. Dad got offended when I talked to him about it, but he continues to do it. Mom refuses to get involved, and I have said all I can say. What to do?
FOOD
July 26, 1989 | By Jean Anderson and Elaine Hanna, Special to The Inquirer
Is there anyone who doesn't love pasta? And is there anyone who doesn't hate to slave over a hot stove when the temperatures are nudging 90? With a microwave oven, you can whip up pasta casseroles and salads in almost no time, and certainly without any sweat or swelter. We're not recommending that you actually boil pasta in a microwave oven, mind you. That's a quick job best done on top of the stove. But once the pasta's cooked, it can be stirred into a casserole that microwaves to perfection.
FOOD
November 12, 2000 | By Marie Oser, FOR THE INQUIRER
Serving a meal with a south-of-the-border accent captures a sense of celebration - sensual, colorful and bursting with flavor. The richness of Mexican cuisine has developed over centuries. It is a dramatic blend of the original Indian fare and the strong influences of the Spanish. The preeminent agricultural contribution that the early natives called maize, and we know as corn, still plays a significant role. Grains, as well as legumes, are staples, with meat used sparingly.
FOOD
March 19, 2009 | By Rick Nelson, MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE
Timing is everything, and cookbook author Beatrice Ojakangas might have the best in the business. Her latest cookbook - her 26th, an astounding record - could not have landed in bookstores at a more opportune moment. After all, when the economy slows down, out comes the Pyrex. In The Best Casserole Cookbook Ever (Chronicle, $24.95), Ojakangas has found all kinds of ingenious ways - more than 500, actually - to say "baked-in-a-dish" and still mean casserole: Gratin. Strada.
NEWS
December 11, 2015 | BY MAUREEN FITZGERALD, Inquirer Food Editor mfitzgerald@phillynews.com, 215-854-5744
NOT SO LONG AGO, the casserole was the MVP in the American dinner lineup, an easy and economical supper without fuss. Tuna-noodle; chicken and rice; ground beef and macaroni; these were the staples of many childhood dinners. But in this generation, many children have no familiarity with this comfort-food genre. "All the kids were asking, 'What's a casserole?' " said Susan Munafo, a volunteer at after-school cooking class at William Loesche Elementary in Northeast Philadelphia. "I guess people don't make them anymore.
FOOD
August 7, 1994 | By Faye Levy, FOR THE INQUIRER
Ratatouille, an aromatic casserole of eggplant, zucchini, peppers, onions and tomatoes, is a classic that has withstood the test of time. Originally from Nice on the French Riviera, this luscious vegetable stew is often made at home in France and is popular in restaurants and charcuteries throughout the country. Vegetarians make a meal of ratatouille with bread, rice or pasta, or roll it in a crepe. Meat-eaters serve it with grilled or roast chicken, lamb, beef or veal. It seems to have a place for every taste.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
FOOD
April 1, 2016
Makes 4 servings 1 recipe basic polenta 11/2 teaspoons butter (for the casserole dish) 4 links of mild Italian salmon sausage, sliced into bite-size pieces 1/2 cup grated parmesan cheese 1 tablespoon olive oil 11/2 cup tomato sauce (homemade if possible) 8 ounces mozzarella cheese, grated Basic Polenta 3 cups nonfat milk 1 tablespoon butter 1 teaspoon sugar 1/2 teaspoon salt 1 cup stone ground yellow cornmeal 1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees.
NEWS
December 11, 2015 | BY MAUREEN FITZGERALD, Inquirer Food Editor mfitzgerald@phillynews.com, 215-854-5744
NOT SO LONG AGO, the casserole was the MVP in the American dinner lineup, an easy and economical supper without fuss. Tuna-noodle; chicken and rice; ground beef and macaroni; these were the staples of many childhood dinners. But in this generation, many children have no familiarity with this comfort-food genre. "All the kids were asking, 'What's a casserole?' " said Susan Munafo, a volunteer at after-school cooking class at William Loesche Elementary in Northeast Philadelphia. "I guess people don't make them anymore.
FOOD
December 11, 2015 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, Inquirer Food Editor
Not so long ago, the casserole was the MVP in the American dinner lineup, an easy and economical supper without fuss. Tuna noodle, chicken and rice, ground beef and macaroni, these were the staples of many childhood dinners. But in this generation, many children have no familiarity with this comfort-food genre. "All the kids were asking, 'What's a casserole?' " said Susan Munafo, a volunteer at after-school cooking class at William Loesche Elementary in Northeast Philadelphia.
FOOD
September 11, 2015 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
Confession: I have never had a tuna-noodle casserole. I don't know what that is, exactly, and don't harbor much curiosity. It just doesn't sound that appealing to me. You, on the other hand, may have grown up eating some variation of this unfussy, belly-filling comfort food that laughs in the face of low-carb diet fads. For me, that comfort food is kugel. This catchall genre of starchy, egg-bound casserole shows up at almost every Jewish holiday table in one form or another.
NEWS
September 19, 2014
LABORATORY safety regulations typically dictate that no food should be found within close reach of the experimental action - no one needs nitric acid in their nachos, after all. Drexel's Center for Hospitality and Sport Management, however, is a different kind of lab, one that's earned an exception to this rule since fussing with food is all they do there. The sixth floor of the Paul Peck Problem-Solving and Research Center, at 33rd and Arch streets, is home to the Drexel Food Lab, a collective that lends its brain to corporate and nonprofit clients.
NEWS
June 9, 2013
D EAR ABBY: I host all of the holiday parties and dinner parties for my family. Whenever I have my parents over, my father insists on helping himself to the top layer of every casserole. He'll scrape all the cheese off the potatoes, the crunchy onion topping off the green bean casserole, etc., leaving just the bare vegetables for everyone else. I have asked Dad not to do it because it is inconsiderate of the other guests. I can see people are bothered by it, so now they make a beeline to the buffet so they can beat him to it. Dad got offended when I talked to him about it, but he continues to do it. Mom refuses to get involved, and I have said all I can say. What to do?
FOOD
December 22, 2011
This is an excerpt from Craig LaBan's online chat.   Craig: I did a fair bit of casserole-dish cooking these last couple of weeks, including one of my favorite dishes for leftover brisket: shepherd's pie. All I do is crumble about 1-2 pounds of leftover brisket into a sauté pan with carrots, parsnips, leeks, peas, and garlic. Add half a can of tomato paste, a cup of white wine (or more, just to moisten), then layer into a casserole pan below some fresh mashed potatoes (about 2 pounds worth)
FOOD
November 12, 2009
Cheese of the Month I'm usually a purist when it comes to my monthly fromage, but Shellbark Hollow Farm's fresh goat has become such a splendid canvas for local chefs, I couldn't resist this casserole from Southwark's Sheri Waide. It's an easy holiday hit. Waide creams a quarter-pound each of Shellbark's fresh and aged goat cheeses, then adds a custard of 8 eggs blended with a quart of heavy cream and 2 tablespoons of chopped herbs (parsley, thyme, rosemary, tarragon, and chives)
ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 2009
Here's a recipe for boeuf bourguignon inspired by Julia Child and her classic book, "Mastering the Art of French Cooking," from the Web site www.recipezaar.com . BOEUF BOURGUIGNON A LA JULIA CHILD For the stew: 6 ounces bacon, solid chunk 1 tablespoon olive oil 3 pounds lean stewing beef, cut into 2-inch cubes 1 carrot, peeled and sliced 1 onion, peeled and sliced 1 teaspoon salt 1/4 teaspoon pepper, freshly ground 2 tablespoons flour 3 cups red wine (a full-bodied wine like Bordeaux, Burgundy or Chianti)
NEWS
August 4, 2009 | By DAFNEY TALES, talesd@phillynews.com 215-854-5084
It was tough convincing a handful of city kids to grow their own fruits and vegetables in a farm at a West Oak Lane high school. But after months of pulling weeds and sowing seeds, once-reluctant teens have become proud farmers eager to feed a community with their yield, said Chris Bolden-Newsome, a farmer with the nonprofit education group Foundations. "Deprogramming" the teens was the hardest part, he said yesterday outisde Martin Luther King High School, where about 70 people gathered on meals prepared by the student farmers.
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