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Cassius Clay

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NEWS
January 9, 1998 | By Andy Wallace, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER Inquirer staff writer Rusty Pray contributed to this article
Jeremiah Shabazz, 70, former minister of Mosque No. 12 of the Philadelphia Nation of Islam and confidant and adviser to Muhammad Ali, died of congestive heart failure Wednesday. It was Mr. Shabazz, a family member said, who in 1960 persuaded boxer Cassius Clay to become a follower of Elijah Muhammad and to become Muhammad Ali. In the late 1970s, Mr. Shabazz joined Ali's entourage, and news accounts at the time refer to him as the boxer's "top aide," "administrative assistant" and "legal counsel," although he had no law degree.
NEWS
March 13, 1989 | BY JACK MCKINNEY
I would be remiss if I didn't record the shocked disbelief among Sonny Liston's many local friends when it was learned the former heavyweight champion had been found dead in Las Vegas. Sonny's body was discovered on Jan. 5, 1971, by his wife, Geraldine, in their luxury home adjoining a country club in Paradise Valley, two miles east of the famed Las Vegas "strip. " Geraldine, just back from an extended tour of holiday visits with relatives and friends, had been away from the house for 10 days.
NEWS
March 20, 2011 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
When Muhammad Ali was training for a fight in Deer Lake, Pa., in the 1970s, the boxer was visited at his Schuylkill County compound by one of the few people in the world as famous as he. "A few years ago, Elvis came to see me at my training camp, stayed two weeks," Ali told TV Guide in 1979. "I said, 'Elvis, do me a favor. I got a guitar.' " The Greatest wanted The King to help him stir up a little trouble. He persuaded Presley to come with him to a bar in nearby Pottsville, "this little redneck place called Spoonies," where the duo sneaked in the back way. In Ali's telling, Presley went to the microphone with a towel on his head, then pulled it off, and sang, 'You ain't nothin' but a hound dog, cryin' all the time.
NEWS
September 3, 1996 | by Tonya Pendleton, Daily News Staff Writer
MUHAMMAD ALI: THE WHOLE STORY. 8 tonight on TNT (rebroadcast at 10 p.m. and midnight). This year's Olympic Games produced drama and tragedy that even ratings-obsessed NBC couldn't have scripted. Kerri Strug's vault is sure to be the stuff of documentarians' dreams for years to come, and Michael Johnson's world record in the 200-meter will no doubt be viewed one day with the same awe as Jesse Owens' accomplishments in track and field. But perhaps the defining moment of the 1996 Olympic Games came when a solitary man, shaking from the effects of Parkinson's syndrome, lit the Olympic flame to begin them.
SPORTS
February 2, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
ANGELO DUNDEE, the brilliant motivator who worked the corner for Muhammad Ali in his greatest fights and willed Sugar Ray Leonard to victory in his biggest bout, died yesterday in Tampa, Fla. He was 90. The genial South Philadelphia native was best known for being in Ali's corner for almost his entire career, but those in boxing also knew him as an ambassador for boxing and a figure of integrity in a sport that often lacked it. He died...
NEWS
July 5, 2000
Again, a Philadelphia sports team is about to make a typical Philadelphia bonehead mistake. Why would a team even consider trading the league's most dominating scorer, other than Shaq (pretty damn good company)? So what if Allen Iverson is late for practices? Would the Lakers consider trading Kobe because he needs a haircut? Why don't we ask our new National Basketball Association champions? MARTIN JACKSON Philadelphia Running in the ring Bill DeWees (letter, June 21)
NEWS
November 20, 1992 | by Dan Hawkins, Daily News Staff Writer
In his autobiography, Malcolm X spared few details of a richly textured life, and his human impulses shine next to his saintly seriousness of purpose. To see how well you've paid attention to the book, or what you can recall from long-ago readings, here's a pop quiz: 1. What make of automobile did he prefer? 2. In which grade was he elected class president? 3. What was the name of his best dance partner? 4. Who was instrumental in Malcolm X's decision to get out of New York City during his hustler phase?
NEWS
July 11, 2012 | Inquirer Editorial
The selection of boxing legend Muhammad Ali to receive the 2012 Liberty Medal has sparked debate, given his refusal four decades ago to fight in the Vietnam War. But his standing up for religious principles only makes the award more appropriate. The boxer known more now for his advocacy of civil rights at home and abroad has been an ardent promoter of world peace and humanitarian causes. A sufferer of Parkinson's disease, he also has helped raise funds for the Special Olympics and for the Muhammad Ali Parkinson's Research Center in Phoenix.
SPORTS
September 12, 2012 | Associated Press
LOUISVILLE, Ky. - A fan of Muhammad Ali has acquired an important piece of memorabilia: the boxing great's boyhood home. Las Vegas real estate investor Jared Weiss closed on the property earlier this week, a Louisville realtor told the Associated Press on Tuesday. Realtor Dave Lambrechts said Weiss paid $70,000 for the small white house with a sagging front porch overhang at 3302 West Grand Ave., in a neighborhood of neat, modest homes. "The guy's a huge Ali fan, and that's what kind of spurred this," Lambrechts said.
NEWS
January 2, 2002 | By LARRY ATKINS
I WAS NEVER a fan of Muhammad Ali. To a generation of baby boomers, Ali may have been a cultural icon and a hero, but to me, Ali was just another successful sports figure to root against, much like Notre Dame, the New York Yankees and the Boston Celtics. Even though I did the best impersonation of Howard Cosell in my elementary school, I loved it when Joe Frazier knocked Ali down and won their first fight; I seethed inside when Ali outfoxed George Foreman and "shook up the world" in Zaire; I jumped up and down with glee when Ken Norton broke Ali's jaw. When crowds chanted "Ali, Ali, Ali," I would chant "lose, lose, lose.
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NEWS
September 14, 2012 | By Robert Moran, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Muhammad Ali, dressed in a black suit and wearing sunglasses, stood nearly motionless Thursday night as he stared down intently at the Liberty Medal that had just been presented to him. The 70-year-old Ali, fighting through his Parkinson's disease, briefly lifted his right hand to acknowledge the sustained standing ovation of the audience on the front lawn of the National Constitution Center. The crowd erupted in a rousing chant: "Ali! Ali! Ali!" The world champion boxer, antiwar hero, and cultural icon was awarded the 2012 medal for his life as a transformative figure personifying the struggle for liberty.
SPORTS
September 12, 2012 | Associated Press
LOUISVILLE, Ky. - A fan of Muhammad Ali has acquired an important piece of memorabilia: the boxing great's boyhood home. Las Vegas real estate investor Jared Weiss closed on the property earlier this week, a Louisville realtor told the Associated Press on Tuesday. Realtor Dave Lambrechts said Weiss paid $70,000 for the small white house with a sagging front porch overhang at 3302 West Grand Ave., in a neighborhood of neat, modest homes. "The guy's a huge Ali fan, and that's what kind of spurred this," Lambrechts said.
NEWS
July 11, 2012 | Inquirer Editorial
The selection of boxing legend Muhammad Ali to receive the 2012 Liberty Medal has sparked debate, given his refusal four decades ago to fight in the Vietnam War. But his standing up for religious principles only makes the award more appropriate. The boxer known more now for his advocacy of civil rights at home and abroad has been an ardent promoter of world peace and humanitarian causes. A sufferer of Parkinson's disease, he also has helped raise funds for the Special Olympics and for the Muhammad Ali Parkinson's Research Center in Phoenix.
SPORTS
February 2, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
ANGELO DUNDEE, the brilliant motivator who worked the corner for Muhammad Ali in his greatest fights and willed Sugar Ray Leonard to victory in his biggest bout, died yesterday in Tampa, Fla. He was 90. The genial South Philadelphia native was best known for being in Ali's corner for almost his entire career, but those in boxing also knew him as an ambassador for boxing and a figure of integrity in a sport that often lacked it. He died...
NEWS
November 10, 2011 | By William C. Kashatus, For the Daily News
Ironically, Joe Frazier's fame will forever be linked to his greatest rival, Muhammad Ali. The two athletes could hardly have been more dissimilar in personality and style. Ali was a brash, colorful, quick-witted master showman with a remarkable ability for self-promotion. Frazier, who died this week at 67, was quiet, humble, and likely to hang in the background. While Ali dispatched opponents with incredibly fast hands and reflexes, Frazier's style was blue-collar. He bobbed, weaved, and grunted before knocking out opponents with a devastating left hook.
SPORTS
May 2, 2011
The original center court jump-ball circle from UCLA's Pauley Pavilion has netted $325,085 at auction. SCP Auctions said Sunday that it's the most ever paid for a piece of college basketball memorabilia. The 12-foot jump circle was used from 1965 to 1982 by the men's teams that won eight national championships. Former UCLA coach John Wooden and some of his greats, including Kareem Abdul-Jabbar and Bill Walton , had signed the hunk of hardwood. When the auction was announced in March, UCLA said it hoped to work out a deal to return the circle to the campus.
SPORTS
May 2, 2011 | Daily News Wire Services
Former heavyweight boxer Henry Cooper , one of Britain's most popular sportsmen who was best known for knocking down Muhammad Ali while he was still known as Cassius Clay , died yesterday. He was 76. The first boxer to be knighted and receive the title "Sir" from a British monarch, Cooper died just 2 days before his 77th birthday, the British Boxing Board of Control said. He died at his son's house in Oxted, Surrey, in southern England, after an extended illness. "I am at a loss for words over the death of my friend, Henry Cooper," Ali said in a statement.
NEWS
March 20, 2011 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
When Muhammad Ali was training for a fight in Deer Lake, Pa., in the 1970s, the boxer was visited at his Schuylkill County compound by one of the few people in the world as famous as he. "A few years ago, Elvis came to see me at my training camp, stayed two weeks," Ali told TV Guide in 1979. "I said, 'Elvis, do me a favor. I got a guitar.' " The Greatest wanted The King to help him stir up a little trouble. He persuaded Presley to come with him to a bar in nearby Pottsville, "this little redneck place called Spoonies," where the duo sneaked in the back way. In Ali's telling, Presley went to the microphone with a towel on his head, then pulled it off, and sang, 'You ain't nothin' but a hound dog, cryin' all the time.
NEWS
January 20, 2010 | By Howard Shapiro INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In this corner - he floats like a butterfly! Stings like a bee! - is the heavyweight champion of the world: Muhammad Ali. And in this corner - he shuffles, he grins, he personifies sad but sly subservience - is the first black actor with Hollywood star billing and the last one anyone wants to emulate: Stepin Fetchit. Not a promising bout, you might say. And while it never took place in the ring, it may have happened intellectually. Not long before the milestone second heavyweight title fight between Ali and Sonny Liston in 1965, Ali and Stepin Fetchit became friends and Fetchit became part of the champ's entourage.
NEWS
January 2, 2002 | By LARRY ATKINS
I WAS NEVER a fan of Muhammad Ali. To a generation of baby boomers, Ali may have been a cultural icon and a hero, but to me, Ali was just another successful sports figure to root against, much like Notre Dame, the New York Yankees and the Boston Celtics. Even though I did the best impersonation of Howard Cosell in my elementary school, I loved it when Joe Frazier knocked Ali down and won their first fight; I seethed inside when Ali outfoxed George Foreman and "shook up the world" in Zaire; I jumped up and down with glee when Ken Norton broke Ali's jaw. When crowds chanted "Ali, Ali, Ali," I would chant "lose, lose, lose.
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