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ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 1987 | By JOSEPH P. BLAKE, Daily News Staff Writer
There've been more changes, and a little more information from the networks about what we'll be missing on television this summer while we're all out in the Florida surf or sunning in Mexico. From NBC: "Our House," will lighten-up a bit by putting more emphasis on comedy; new cast members for "The Facts of Life" and "Amen" will be added in the fall. Sherrie Kren, a native of Australia, joins "Facts" as an exchange student at Eastland Academy, and "Amen's" Sherman Hemsley adopts a young son, who has yet to be cast.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 29, 2012
Theater Oleanna Through Oct. 14 at Bristol Riverside Playhouse, 120 Radcliffe St., Bristol. Tickets: $10-$45. Information: 215-785-0100 or www.brtstage.org .
NEWS
May 8, 1995 | by Mary Flannery, Daily News Staff Writer
You've tried standing on one foot. You've tried the plastic bag trick. But no matter what you do, the cast on your broken ankle still gets wet when you take a shower. Now there is a solution, according to orthopedic technician Bill Schaefer of Turnersville, N.J. Since last summer, he has been using 3-M Wet-to Dry cast padding, which is designed to repel water. "I use this padding exclusively," said Schaefer, who works at Tri-County Orthopedics. "I put everyone in it because the biggest hardship is that you can't get washed.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 1987 | Daily News Wire Services
Several members of the current and former cast of "The Young and the Restless" (weekdays on Channel 10) have released their own LP. The singers include Tracey E. Bregman, Colleen Casey, Michael Damian, Beth Maitland and Patty Weaver. This marks the first time cast members of a daytime show have recorded together. According to Damian, the idea came from the fans. "We kept getting requests from viewers and thought it would be a good idea to record the music. " The three that Damian recorded are the same songs he sang on the show.
NEWS
April 23, 2007 | By Howard Shapiro INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Shakespeare must go through a big battle between the British and the French in Henry V, so he cheats. Through the play, he sends out a chorus in a theatrical preemptive strike: Sorry, they apologize, the play should be more convincing. Or it's too distant. Or the scene change is too quick. Not a wisp of this is true on the Delaware Theatre Company Stage, where director Sanford Robbins' scrappy, inventive production of the play opened Saturday night. Robbins stages Henry V all around us, and we become a part of the swirl between the king of England and the French, and the Battle of Agincourt that ensues in 1415.
SPORTS
October 9, 1995 | by Phil Jasner, Daily News Sports Writer
The cast protecting Jerry Stackhouse's left hand is shrinking even as we speak. The legend of the kid from Kinston, N.C., is growing. The 76ers' rookie shooting guard began training camp with his hand encased in a cast that went down to the forearm, protecting a hairline fracture just above the ring finger. By last night, he was wearing a much smaller version, covering just the immediate area of concern. "It keeps getting smaller," Stackhouse said after fully participating in all of the drills and scrimmaging at the Bob Carpenter Complex.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 1993 | Inquirer staff reviews and synopses, compiled by Christopher Cornell
Two movies with ensemble casts and plots about life among the contemporary midlife set top this week's list of new movies on video. INDIAN SUMMER 1/2 (1993) (Touchstone) $94.95. 108 minutes. Alan Arkin, Matt Craven, Sam Raimi, Diane Lane, Julie Warner, Bill Paxton, Elizabeth Perkins, Kevin Pollak, Vincent Spano. Don't believe anyone who tells you Indian Summer is a boomer reunion film in the spirit of The Return of the Secaucus Seven and The Big Chill. This summer-camp reunion film has a much better-looking ensemble cast, but the members don't mourn the loss of their ideals.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 31, 2014 | By Wendy Rosenfield, For The Inquirer
It's not often I get to write an unabashed rave that's also an expression of civic pride, so listen up: The Arden Theatre's revival of Incorruptible is a valentine to and from the Philadelphia theater community. An Arden greatest hit from its 1995-96 season, it's written by Michael Hollinger, a Philadelphia-based playwright, and features an all-Philadelphia cast, director, and designers. But that's not the only reason you should care. You should care because this production, about a medieval French monastery whose saintly miracle-performing relics and income have both flatlined, has a nimble, sharp script matched with performances by a cast that's a natural fit. Proven entities such as Ian Merrill Peakes as Brother Martin, a high-strung, Machiavellian monk, and Marcia Saunders as Agatha, a tyrannical monster (monstress?
NEWS
August 18, 1990 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the corner, two boys were applying a cast to a youngster's leg and foot as he sat patiently in a chair. And at nearby tables, children were gazing down at the stark white casts of hands, arms and faces. The odd sight may have been more in keeping with a first-aid class than an art museum. But this week, the children weren't mending limbs; they were creating sculptures as part of a summer art program at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, Broad and Cherry Streets.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 1987 | By William B. Collins, Inquirer Theater Critic
Broadway musicals rarely make sense in revival, especially when they are exhumed by opera houses in a self-conscious attempt to confer artistic status on them. The musical is an artifact of the age for which it was written and produced. Its creative energy is drawn from a combination of factors of the moment, not the least of which is the profit incentive. It is not art, except by rare accident; and when the New York City Opera does a Brigadoon, as it did not long ago, the effect is to diminish the work by suggesting that it is something other than what it is. Operatic albums of classic musicals, the so-called "crossover" phenomenon, lack the vitality and excitement that an original-cast album can capture.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 15, 2015 | By Ben Finley, Inquirer Staff Writer
He adjudicates from a wheelchair now, oxygen tubes nestled under the rims of his glasses as he speaks. But Albert Cepparulo's voice - coated in a thick Port Richmond accent - remains strong and steady, handing down sentences that range from empathetic to staggering. Last year, for example, the Bucks County Common Pleas Court judge gave an 81-year-old man 935 to 1,870 years for sexually assaulting a girl and videotaping the abuse. More recently, he spared a man from jail time for drug possession, concerned he could lose his job. Cepparulo has stayed on the bench even when his fellow judges thought he was too ill to work.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 2015 | By Jim Rutter, For The Inquirer
Can you revisit the magic, and perhaps repair the frustrations, of a childhood at once idyllic and a persistent source of contemporary stress? The folks at Bucks County Playhouse must have thought so when they decided to produce Ernest Thompson's On Golden Pond, which features the finest performances I've seen on stage this season. Thompson's 1979 play portrays a lost slice of Americana in its story of Norman and Ethel Thayer, spending their 48th summer in a secluded cabin on Golden Pond in Maine.
NEWS
June 22, 2015 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the shadow of Charleston, scores gathered in Germantown on Saturday to celebrate the events of a day 150 years ago - the freeing of slaves on American soil. People met near the spot where the first protest against slavery was written, joined a loud, drum-banging march up and down hilly Germantown Avenue, and fell silent at emotional reenactments of the plight of those who had been held in servitude. They called out the names of ancestors and remembered those whose names have been lost.
NEWS
April 15, 2015 | By Barbara Boyer, Jonathan Tamari, Melanie Burney, and Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writers
The four sons of Cooper Health System CEO John P. Sheridan Jr. and his wife raised new questions Monday about their parents' death, and alleged that investigators botched the case from the beginning. In the latest round in a mounting public campaign seeking to prove that their parents were murdered, they released a letter to Somerset County Prosecutor Geoffrey D. Soriano accusing his office of ignoring evidence and hastily determining that the deaths were a murder-suicide. "All we want is the answers to what happened to our parents," one of the sons, Mark, said Monday during an interview at his Newark, N.J., law office.
SPORTS
April 3, 2015 | BY TOM MAHON, Daily News Staff Writer mahont@phillynews.com
TOM BRADY staged a pretty good April Fools' Day stunt yesterday. The Patriots quarterback has been taking some needless risks while vacationing in the Bahamas, including diving off a 40-foot cliff and playing one-on-one against Michael Jordan. So yesterday on Facebook, Brady posted a doctored photo of himself in a full-body cast with Jordan's signature on his left leg. Something tells us Patriots coach Bill Belichick didn't find it very funny.   Career in 'Jeopardy!
NEWS
March 16, 2015 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
In his appeals to a national audience, Gov. Christie is promoting a record of fiscal accomplishment in New Jersey: cutting spending, shrinking the state payroll, and bucking Democratic demands to raise taxes after years of excess in Trenton. "If we did it in New Jersey, . . . for God's sake we can do it in the United States of America," he recently told a crowd at a Republican dinner in New Hampshire, after describing $2.5 billion in cuts to spending and an 8,000-person reduction in the state government workforce.
NEWS
February 27, 2015
LAST YEAR, the Daily News inaugurated our contest to find the best vegan cheesesteak in Philly. We were curious to see how many places offered a meatless, cheeseless version of the iconic Philadelphia sandwich. The public nominated 23 venues, and, in the final tasting event, Blackbird Pizzeria took the honors. Yet, even as the greasy foil wrappers were being wadded up for disposal, cries of "wait till next year!" were heard among the runners-up. Now Blackbird aims to defend its title as we seek the 2015 Best Vegan Cheesesteak in Philly . Voting opens today and ends at noon on March 18. One voter chosen at random will win dinner for two at Flora Restaurant, in Jenkintown.
FOOD
February 13, 2015 | By Elisa Ludwig, For The Inquirer
Your favorite pan in the kitchen, the one that delivers the best results time and again, inspires a special kind of love. A love that can't be tempered by rust nor by achy arm muscles. This is an ode to the cast-iron skillet. No one remembers purchasing his first cast-iron skillet, as Ellen Brown points out in her well-researched The New Cast Iron Skillet Cookbook (Sterling Epicure). Like umbrellas, they come into our lives full of functional possibility, often well-used, patiently waiting at the ready for us to discover their indispensable place in the kitchen.
SPORTS
November 8, 2014 | BY FRANK SERAVALLI, Daily News Staff Writer seravaf@phillynews.com
BRAYDEN SCHENN blasted down the boards and pickpocketed Panthers defenseman Brian Campbell, giving Campbell a shove on his way toward the slot. Gliding toward the left, Schenn cradled the puck and deftly dished right, in the direction of Sean Couturier's outstretched stick. Panthers netminder Roberto Luongo, sprawled on the still-fresh first-period ice, had little chance as the puck curled around the back of the net smoother than a new stick of deodorant. It was the first glimpse of Schenn's most inspired period of hockey this season.
NEWS
November 4, 2014
WHEN Scottish citizens went to the polls in September to vote for independence, nearly 85 percent of the voting population turned out. Last year's election in Philadelphia saw a turnout of 11 percent. You could say that the stakes were higher for Scotland, since it was voting to govern and rule itself, and last year's local election here had few big races. But that's hardly an excuse for our spotty track record - as Philadelphians and as Pennsylvanians - to exercise our rights as free citizens.
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