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ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 1987 | By JOSEPH P. BLAKE, Daily News Staff Writer
There've been more changes, and a little more information from the networks about what we'll be missing on television this summer while we're all out in the Florida surf or sunning in Mexico. From NBC: "Our House," will lighten-up a bit by putting more emphasis on comedy; new cast members for "The Facts of Life" and "Amen" will be added in the fall. Sherrie Kren, a native of Australia, joins "Facts" as an exchange student at Eastland Academy, and "Amen's" Sherman Hemsley adopts a young son, who has yet to be cast.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 29, 2012
Theater Oleanna Through Oct. 14 at Bristol Riverside Playhouse, 120 Radcliffe St., Bristol. Tickets: $10-$45. Information: 215-785-0100 or www.brtstage.org .
NEWS
May 8, 1995 | by Mary Flannery, Daily News Staff Writer
You've tried standing on one foot. You've tried the plastic bag trick. But no matter what you do, the cast on your broken ankle still gets wet when you take a shower. Now there is a solution, according to orthopedic technician Bill Schaefer of Turnersville, N.J. Since last summer, he has been using 3-M Wet-to Dry cast padding, which is designed to repel water. "I use this padding exclusively," said Schaefer, who works at Tri-County Orthopedics. "I put everyone in it because the biggest hardship is that you can't get washed.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 1987 | Daily News Wire Services
Several members of the current and former cast of "The Young and the Restless" (weekdays on Channel 10) have released their own LP. The singers include Tracey E. Bregman, Colleen Casey, Michael Damian, Beth Maitland and Patty Weaver. This marks the first time cast members of a daytime show have recorded together. According to Damian, the idea came from the fans. "We kept getting requests from viewers and thought it would be a good idea to record the music. " The three that Damian recorded are the same songs he sang on the show.
NEWS
April 23, 2007 | By Howard Shapiro INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Shakespeare must go through a big battle between the British and the French in Henry V, so he cheats. Through the play, he sends out a chorus in a theatrical preemptive strike: Sorry, they apologize, the play should be more convincing. Or it's too distant. Or the scene change is too quick. Not a wisp of this is true on the Delaware Theatre Company Stage, where director Sanford Robbins' scrappy, inventive production of the play opened Saturday night. Robbins stages Henry V all around us, and we become a part of the swirl between the king of England and the French, and the Battle of Agincourt that ensues in 1415.
SPORTS
October 9, 1995 | by Phil Jasner, Daily News Sports Writer
The cast protecting Jerry Stackhouse's left hand is shrinking even as we speak. The legend of the kid from Kinston, N.C., is growing. The 76ers' rookie shooting guard began training camp with his hand encased in a cast that went down to the forearm, protecting a hairline fracture just above the ring finger. By last night, he was wearing a much smaller version, covering just the immediate area of concern. "It keeps getting smaller," Stackhouse said after fully participating in all of the drills and scrimmaging at the Bob Carpenter Complex.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 1993 | Inquirer staff reviews and synopses, compiled by Christopher Cornell
Two movies with ensemble casts and plots about life among the contemporary midlife set top this week's list of new movies on video. INDIAN SUMMER 1/2 (1993) (Touchstone) $94.95. 108 minutes. Alan Arkin, Matt Craven, Sam Raimi, Diane Lane, Julie Warner, Bill Paxton, Elizabeth Perkins, Kevin Pollak, Vincent Spano. Don't believe anyone who tells you Indian Summer is a boomer reunion film in the spirit of The Return of the Secaucus Seven and The Big Chill. This summer-camp reunion film has a much better-looking ensemble cast, but the members don't mourn the loss of their ideals.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 31, 2014 | By Wendy Rosenfield, For The Inquirer
It's not often I get to write an unabashed rave that's also an expression of civic pride, so listen up: The Arden Theatre's revival of Incorruptible is a valentine to and from the Philadelphia theater community. An Arden greatest hit from its 1995-96 season, it's written by Michael Hollinger, a Philadelphia-based playwright, and features an all-Philadelphia cast, director, and designers. But that's not the only reason you should care. You should care because this production, about a medieval French monastery whose saintly miracle-performing relics and income have both flatlined, has a nimble, sharp script matched with performances by a cast that's a natural fit. Proven entities such as Ian Merrill Peakes as Brother Martin, a high-strung, Machiavellian monk, and Marcia Saunders as Agatha, a tyrannical monster (monstress?
NEWS
October 15, 2012 | By Jim Rutter, For The Inquirer
Women in Shakespeare's day weren't allowed to perform on stage. In Quintessence's production of the Bard's Othello , director Alexander Burns won't let them play, either. At first glance, it seems an odd choice. The central plot revolves around Iago (Josh Carpenter), an ensign passed over for promotion by his Moorish general, Othello (Khris Davis), in favor of pretty-boy academic Cassio (Daniel Fredrick). Othello's marriage to the fair Desdemona (an excellent Ross Bennett Hurwitz)
NEWS
August 18, 1990 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the corner, two boys were applying a cast to a youngster's leg and foot as he sat patiently in a chair. And at nearby tables, children were gazing down at the stark white casts of hands, arms and faces. The odd sight may have been more in keeping with a first-aid class than an art museum. But this week, the children weren't mending limbs; they were creating sculptures as part of a summer art program at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, Broad and Cherry Streets.
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NEWS
December 28, 2015
Louis DiGiaimo, 77, an Emmy-winning casting director who made his name with The Godfather - and whose New York sensibilities flavored a string of successful Hollywood films and TV shows - has died. Mr. DiGiaimo, a son of Italian immigrants who lived all his life in his native New Jersey, died in Oakland in that state Dec. 19. He suffered complications from a stroke in May, said Lee DiGiaimo, his wife of 53 years. He specialized in discovering unknown actors who would inject a jolt of authenticity into character roles.
SPORTS
November 1, 2015 | By Marc Narducci, Inquirer Staff Writer
Lee Fitting, the senior coordinator producer for ESPN's wildly popular College GameDay , is always asked how he picks the site for his show, one that has rolled into town and will be live on Saturday from 9 a.m until noon from Independence Mall. "Our mantra isn't to go to the game of the day, most fans have a skewed view of that," Fitting said Friday afternoon outside the GameDay set in the middle of Market Street. "We go where the best story is and there is a difference between the best story and best game.
NEWS
October 23, 2015 | By Wendy Rosenfield, For The Inquirer
Even under the most scrupulous care, The Taming of the Shrew presents problems for modern audiences, particularly if they include school groups who might be encountering the Bard for the first time. Philadelphia Shakespeare Theatre further raises the stakes on the ultimate pick-up artist rom-com by presenting it Original Practice-style, mostly self-directed (though Carmen Khan is listed as director in the program), with minimal rehearsal, contemporary costumes drawn from the performers' own wardrobes, simple lighting, and an unadorned set. The trouble with presenting this play without strong directorial guidance is a matter of missing the forest for the trees.
NEWS
September 21, 2015 | By Michael D. Schaffer, For The Inquirer
The faithful still bring their cares to the fourth bishop of Philadelphia. St. John Neumann, vested in white for Mass and wearing his miter, lies encased in a glass-sided altar at St. Peter the Apostle Catholic Church at Fifth Street and Girard Avenue in Northern Liberties. When he died in 1860, Neumann had such a reputation for holiness that supplicants began coming to his burial place to pray. They beseeched the late bishop, whom they regarded as a special friend of God, to seek divine favor for them.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 15, 2015 | By Wendy Rosenfield, For The Inquirer
With so much Philly Fringe activity happening in the city right now, what could possibly entice theatergoers out to the suburbs for People's Light's regular season opener, particularly if that show is Arthur Miller's All My Sons ? It's a great drama, sure, and a fine tribute to the centenary of Miller's birth , but it's hardly uncharted territory. However, for audiences who saw Kamilah Forbes' direction of August Wilson's Fences last season, the answer is obvious. Bringing back much of that cast, Forbes reframes Miller's classic tale of the American dream-turned-nightmare as a near companion piece to former New York Times culture critic Margo Jefferson's new memoir, Negroland . This African American cast brings to life the tightly proscribed culture of a rising postwar black middle class, secreting away the shameful, swallowing its pain, accepting nothing less than achievement, or overachievement.
NEWS
July 31, 2015 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
Thanh Van Nguyen said he served in South Vietnam's navy and risked his life for U.S. troops before escaping in April 1975, a day before Saigon fell to the communist North Vietnamese. Now 62 and a naturalized citizen, the print shop supervisor and his wife, Gai Thi Tran, 63, live comfortably in East Norriton, Montgomery County. And this summer, the couple had two reasons to celebrate: Their sons were getting married, one in New Jersey, the other in California. But with the hectic joy has come an unexpected and confounding sadness that's unique to foreign-born citizens: the decision by U.S. officials that some relatives may attend while others may not. For Nguyen, the relatives in question were his brother and brother-in-law - nearly identical in age and status, with jobs, children, and deep roots in Vietnam.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 2015 | By Jim Rutter, For The Inquirer
Can you revisit the magic, and perhaps repair the frustrations, of a childhood at once idyllic and a persistent source of contemporary stress? The folks at Bucks County Playhouse must have thought so when they decided to produce Ernest Thompson's On Golden Pond, which features the finest performances I've seen on stage this season. Thompson's 1979 play portrays a lost slice of Americana in its story of Norman and Ethel Thayer, spending their 48th summer in a secluded cabin on Golden Pond in Maine.
NEWS
July 15, 2015 | By Ben Finley, Inquirer Staff Writer
He adjudicates from a wheelchair now, oxygen tubes nestled under the rims of his glasses as he speaks. But Albert Cepparulo's voice - coated in a thick Port Richmond accent - remains strong and steady, handing down sentences that range from empathetic to staggering. Last year, for example, the Bucks County Common Pleas Court judge gave an 81-year-old man 935 to 1,870 years for sexually assaulting a girl and videotaping the abuse. More recently, he spared a man from jail time for drug possession, concerned he could lose his job. Cepparulo has stayed on the bench even when his fellow judges thought he was too ill to work.
NEWS
June 22, 2015 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the shadow of Charleston, scores gathered in Germantown on Saturday to celebrate the events of a day 150 years ago - the freeing of slaves on American soil. People met near the spot where the first protest against slavery was written, joined a loud, drum-banging march up and down hilly Germantown Avenue, and fell silent at emotional reenactments of the plight of those who had been held in servitude. They called out the names of ancestors and remembered those whose names have been lost.
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