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Castaways

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NEWS
July 21, 1989 | ANDREA MIHALIK/ DAILY NEWS
There might be something more enjoyable than floundering around on a lazy summer afternoon, but we trout it. Earlier this week on just such a day, these young castaways - (from left) Tom Kientzy, 9, Chris Kientzy, 6, Shawn O'Connell, 9, and Joseph Allan, 10 - hooked up at a fish hatchery at I-95 and Linden Avenue in Northeast Philadelphia.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 2000 | By Peter Mucha, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Watching Wednesday's Survivor finale will be something like following a presidential election campaign. There are two primaries, then people get to vote for the lesser of two evils. Here's how it works: First, the four remaining players will take part in a contest, and the winner will have immunity from being kicked out during the next vote. Then the four will vote to banish someone, and the top vote-getter has to go. If there's a 2-2 tie, the castaways simply keep voting until the tie is broken.
NEWS
August 22, 2000 | by Jim Nolan, Daily News Staff Writer Daily News television critic Ellen Gray contributed to this report
YOU MEAN TO SAY you haven't seen "Survivor"? Where have you been? On some deserted island in the South China Sea? Well, like it or not, the CBS television series is what everyone's talking about. Everyone, that is, who doesn't have a life, or a job, or a good book to read (say, "Robinson Crusoe"). And the latest Nielsen ratings say that's about 23.9 million people a week. Our job is to help you through the next 48 hours without coming off like (God forbid) a pop culture dummy.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 17, 2002 | By Jennifer Dorazio INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Time to plan your fall Survivor pool. Sixteen castaways have filmed the CBS series' fifth go-round, Survivor: Thailand, which will begin airing in September. They range in age from 23 to 60 and include an Arkansas firefighter-paramedic, a New York cop, a pastor, a used-car salesman, a first-grade teacher, and a dental student. None is from this area. They fended for themselves for 39 days in the tropical jungles (make that bug-infested forests) of Koh Tarutao in Thailand's Tarutao Islands National Park, a chain of 51 islands in the Indian Ocean 600 miles south of Bangkok.
SPORTS
February 9, 1994 | by Phil Jasner, Daily News Sports Writer
Fred Carter hasn't forgotten the 76ers' 4-11 start this season. "I think it took that long for us to get to know one another," the Sixers' coach said after slogging through the snow yesterday to prepare for tonight's game against New York. "We all read the doomsday messages, that we'd win 20, 21, 22 games all season. The ship could've sunk, but it didn't. " Amazingly, the Sixers rang up victory No. 20 Monday night against Charlotte. In last season's nightmarish 26-56 marathon, they didn't reach No. 20 until March 8, didn't notch No. 21 until March 23. "A lot of our guys had been on winning teams elsewhere, but all of a sudden they were looking at one another, not the great names they were used to seeing in other situations," Carter said.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 23, 2000 | By Jennifer Weiner, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As many as 40 million viewers are expected to watch tonight's finale of CBS's Survivor, the summer's biggest hit and probably the biggest series finale of the year. (In comparison, 32.8 million viewers saw Michael J. Fox leave Spin City in May.) Locally, CBS affiliate KYW (Channel 3) predicts an average of 1.4 million viewers will tune in between 8 and 10 p.m. for Survivor's farewell. Produced last spring on the tiny island of Pulau Tiga in the South China Sea, Survivor started airing May 31, when viewers saw 16 people marooned with little more than the clothes on their backs and a ration of rice each.
NEWS
June 29, 2000 | By Jennifer Weiner, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Shhh. Unbelievable as it seems, in an era where nuclear files go wandering and a single mouse-click can transmit news around the globe, CBS has got a secret - namely, the winner of its summer smash game-show cum wilderness expedition, Survivor, which aired the fifth of its 13 episodes last night. On March 13, 16 "castaways" were stranded on a deserted island; for the next 39 days, they competed and voted each other off the island until a single million-dollar winner was left standing.
NEWS
May 8, 2010 | By David Hiltbrand, Inquirer Columnist
Lost and 24 , two daring series that may be the decade's defining shows, are headed for the final roundup this month. And both seem intent on going out in a blaze of gory. 24 was gratuitously trigger-happy this week. What did Dana have to gain by shooting that poor banker in the safe deposit vault? He was a terrified, unarmed white collar guy. She could have just commanded him to sit on the floor. At the very least, this was a waste of ammunition. But Dana got hers when Jack cold-bloodedly executed her. Why?
NEWS
May 25, 2010 | By David Hiltbrand, Inquirer Staff Writer
What a send-off our intrepid castaways got in "The End. " During Sunday night's Hurley-sized Lost finale, the salt-kissed crew was treated to a concert by Charlie's rock band, Drive Shaft. Then they were off on an all-expenses-paid trip to heaven. Or whatever the next stage of their spiritual journey is. Sure, we got the epic showdown between good (Jack) and evil (the fake Locke) at the island's golden grotto. But that took a back seat to the final rapture as the characters in the church, bathed in radiant light, looked up in mute wonder at what awaited them.
NEWS
May 25, 2010 | By David Hiltbrand INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
What a send-off our intrepid castaways got in "The End. " During Sunday night's Hurley-sized Lost finale, the salt-kissed crew was treated to a concert by Charlie's rock band, Drive Shaft. Then they were off on an all-expenses-paid trip to heaven. Or whatever the next stage of their spiritual journey is. Sure, we got the epic showdown between good (Jack) and evil (the fake Locke) at the island's golden grotto. But that took a back seat to the final rapture as the characters in the church, bathed in radiant light, looked up in mute wonder at what awaited them.
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NEWS
June 7, 2013 | By Peter Mucha, Philly.com
Nothing like starting a reality show thinking you're about to die. Michelle Lamelza was in a helicopter nearing Fiji's remote Yasawa Islands, when the competitors were told to take a flying leap into the Pacific - without shark repellent. But Michelle, who spent her early years in Northeast Philadelphia, just laughed as she reflected on three grueling days far from civilization - with no food and only one bottle of water to drink - trying to find a hidden briefcase containing $100,000.
NEWS
August 3, 2011 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Columnist
AT THEIR wedding next month, Brett Condon and Rob Zahorchak should dance to "What a Difference a Day Made. " Because 24 little hours was all it took for their nuptial plans to go from a smooth cruise to a shipwreck. And one day is all it took for the boat to sail again. Readers will recall my column last week about Brett and Rob, who were to wed Sept. 24 aboard the Philadelphia Belle, the Penn's Landing paddle-wheeler that abruptly ceased operations on July 21. They were told not to expect a refund of the $18,998 they'd paid for their wedding, and they had no time or money to plan a new one. But after my call to Belle management, their luck turned.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 6, 2010 | By Howard Gensler
TODAY'S CELEBRITY tell-all book - every day there seems to be a new one - comes from former TV tell-all Pat O'Brien , whom the New York Post 's Page Six calls the disgraced ex-anchor of "The Insider. " But can anyone really be disgraced anymore? Isn't the whole concept of shame so last-century? Page Six says that O'Brien, also a former CBS sportscaster and "Access Hollywood" cohost, is working on the book with writer Andrew Morton . It will deal with his divorce in 2004 from wife Linda , his 2005 "Insider" scandal, rehab, marriage, his 2008 "Insider" firing, and more.
NEWS
May 25, 2010 | By David Hiltbrand INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
What a send-off our intrepid castaways got in "The End. " During Sunday night's Hurley-sized Lost finale, the salt-kissed crew was treated to a concert by Charlie's rock band, Drive Shaft. Then they were off on an all-expenses-paid trip to heaven. Or whatever the next stage of their spiritual journey is. Sure, we got the epic showdown between good (Jack) and evil (the fake Locke) at the island's golden grotto. But that took a back seat to the final rapture as the characters in the church, bathed in radiant light, looked up in mute wonder at what awaited them.
NEWS
May 25, 2010 | By David Hiltbrand, Inquirer Staff Writer
What a send-off our intrepid castaways got in "The End. " During Sunday night's Hurley-sized Lost finale, the salt-kissed crew was treated to a concert by Charlie's rock band, Drive Shaft. Then they were off on an all-expenses-paid trip to heaven. Or whatever the next stage of their spiritual journey is. Sure, we got the epic showdown between good (Jack) and evil (the fake Locke) at the island's golden grotto. But that took a back seat to the final rapture as the characters in the church, bathed in radiant light, looked up in mute wonder at what awaited them.
NEWS
May 8, 2010 | By David Hiltbrand, Inquirer Columnist
Lost and 24 , two daring series that may be the decade's defining shows, are headed for the final roundup this month. And both seem intent on going out in a blaze of gory. 24 was gratuitously trigger-happy this week. What did Dana have to gain by shooting that poor banker in the safe deposit vault? He was a terrified, unarmed white collar guy. She could have just commanded him to sit on the floor. At the very least, this was a waste of ammunition. But Dana got hers when Jack cold-bloodedly executed her. Why?
NEWS
August 21, 2005 | By Howard Shapiro INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Where are all the Europeans? The Japanese? The people who, since the first resort opened in 1972, have been making the tiny Maldives Republic of 1,200 islands one of the world's great tourist pamperers? The travelers are not coming, at least not in force, not since the tsunami in December. Tourism, the Maldives' No. 1 moneymaker, usually accounts for more than a fifth of the national income, and it's down by 49 percent this year. The government had expected tourism tax revenues to come to $43 million by December's end; new projections put it at $31 million.
BUSINESS
January 26, 2004 | By Joseph N. DiStefano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Most of the senior stock-pickers escorted out of Morgan Stanley's West Conshohocken office in what their one-time boss called a display of "corporate hard-heartedness" last October have already found work in Philadelphia's healthy investment sector. No fewer than five veterans of what was once Miller Anderson & Sherrerd have been picked up by Chartwell Investment Partners, Berwyn; three by Nationwide Financial Corp.'s Gartmore Investments in Miquon; two by Lincoln National Corp.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 17, 2002 | By Jennifer Dorazio INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Time to plan your fall Survivor pool. Sixteen castaways have filmed the CBS series' fifth go-round, Survivor: Thailand, which will begin airing in September. They range in age from 23 to 60 and include an Arkansas firefighter-paramedic, a New York cop, a pastor, a used-car salesman, a first-grade teacher, and a dental student. None is from this area. They fended for themselves for 39 days in the tropical jungles (make that bug-infested forests) of Koh Tarutao in Thailand's Tarutao Islands National Park, a chain of 51 islands in the Indian Ocean 600 miles south of Bangkok.
NEWS
March 31, 2002 | By Jake Wagman INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Don't discard those daffodils, and hang on to those hyacinths. Keeping with the spirit of the holidays and the season, the township's Environmental Commission is seeking to collect the potted flowers people receive - and generally throw away - to start a public garden. "We are trying to collect spring flowers, the kind that mom gets on Mother's Day and Easter," said Paul Greger, who is coordinating the program for the township. "In a way, it's a recycling program. " Through the township's Youth Services department, scout troops and other community groups will be recruited to plant the bulbs on a 1 1/2-acre section of Washington Lake Park, Greger said.
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