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Caste System

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NEWS
February 12, 1993 | By Susan Caba, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
U.S. District Judge Louis C. Bechtle yesterday merged the two divisions of Roofers Union Local 30/30B, eliminating what a court-appointed overseer said had become a two-tier caste system in the union. The aim of the court order is to eliminate discrimination against 30B members who, by tradition, were designated as residential reroofers and therefore earned a lower wage than Local 30 members, who did commercial and industrial jobs. Bechtle ordered the union to eliminate all internal distinctions between the two groups, and to dispense roofing jobs based solely on seniority and qualifications.
NEWS
September 25, 1988
I DIG ROCK-AND-ROLL MUSIC I got a sense of so many things from rock and roll - life, living, fun, good times, sex, human possibility. But the thing I got most was freedom, a sense of freeness and expanded awareness. The trick about becoming an adult, it seems to me, is holding on to idealism after you lose innocence. . . .Amnesty International reaffirms that power. In a tough and realistic way allows you to put those ideals to work . . . I never thought I'd be sitting on a panel.
NEWS
June 10, 1989 | By VALCA VALENTINE
When my mother was a senior in high school, a man proposed to her. She was so in love she shared the news with everyone in her hometown of Wilson, N.C. She even told her employer, a white woman. Instead of expressing joy, the woman looked disapproving. She pointed out that even though my mother was black, the man she wanted to marry was jet black. My mother should marry someone closer to her own color, the woman said. She warned that her children would be too dark. My mother wasn't what you'd call "pass-for-white light," but she was what poet Langston Hughes would describe as "honey-gold.
NEWS
January 13, 1986 | By Mike Missanelli, Inquirer Staff Writer
Admittedly, Jeff Huddleston has instituted a caste system with his 1985-86 Upper Dublin basketball team. Starters are starters and subs are subs. "The kids know that we have a solid starting five and that we're going to go with those five as much as possible," said Huddleston. "But the kids on the bench know to be ready at all times because you never know what might happen. " What might and did happen Friday night was an injury - to Cardinals forward Craig Weiss. Into the fold stepped sub Dave Derr, and the Cards didn't miss a beat.
NEWS
July 15, 1999 | By Harris Sussman
Hate crimes will continue in the months just before and after 2000. The perpetrators will be Christian, white men. The timing or location will be symbolically patriotic, such as the Independence Day weekend or a federal building. The target will be people who are not white or the government that is blamed for allowing them to become more prominent in the United States. The reason will be that the United States is not a country in which white, Christian male domination is assured.
NEWS
April 17, 1992 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
Patrick Swayze, having presumably discovered the fleeting nature of being People magazine's Sexiest Man Alive, has lately been trying to become something much more substantial - the Deepest Man Alive. It's all part of the actor's efforts to be taken more seriously by Hollywood, and it began last year with his role as a philosophizing surfer named Bodhisattva in "Point Break. " (Even in "Roadhouse," his bouncer character supposedly had a degree in philosophy from NYU.) The persistent Swayze sticks with the Eastern religion thing in "City of Joy. " He plays a self-doubting physician named Max Lowe who, torn apart after seeing a beloved patient die in his hands, chucks it all for a journey of spiritual discovery in Calcutta.
SPORTS
November 24, 1992 | By Bob Ford, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Doug Moe puts the 76ers on the floor tonight against one of several coaching proteges who are scattered throughout the NBA. Dan Issel in Denver played for Moe, as did George Karl in Seattle. But Charlotte's Allan Bristow is nearly a Moe clone as he pushes the Hornets toward contention in the Central Division. Bristow played three years for Moe in San Antonio and was an assistant coach under him in Denver for six years. He has Bill Hanzlik and T.R. Dunn on his coaching staff - two other former Nuggets who swear by Moe's free-lance basketball philosophy.
NEWS
September 12, 1991 | By Huntly Collins, Inquirer Staff Writer
A controversial proposal that would require all Temple University undergraduates to take a course related to racism drew strong support yesterday from a racially mixed group of students and faculty members who testified at a campus hearing. Anika Trahan, a junior, said the proposed requirement would encourage more dialogue among students who come to the university from largely segregated neighborhoods. "They (white students) come from communities where they are never able to interact with black people," she said.
NEWS
January 21, 1999 | By Gaiutra Bahadur, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
They came to hear an icon speak. And when she did, the message was as unequivocal as the voice that delivered it: "To abandon affirmative action would be like saying there is nothing more to be done about discrimination. " In an address that elicited peals of applause, shouts of support, and a standing ovation from an audience of 1,100 at Camden County College, Coretta Scott King, 71, invoked the past to impeach the present. The widow of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. made clear her position on the struggle over the fate of affirmative action, and she made clear her position on what she called "partisan feuding" in Washington over the fate of President Clinton, who also made an appearance in the Philadelphia region yesterday.
NEWS
July 11, 2002 | By Edward J. Sozanski INQUIRER ART CRITIC
Jaipaul, 74, of Delaware County, a longtime Philadelphia dealer in Indian art who recently made a major gift to the Allentown Art Museum, died of heart failure Friday at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. Jaipaul, who used only one name, operated a gallery in Center City for 20 years. Art dealing, from which he retired in 1997, was his third career. In his native India during the 1950s, he had been a functionary of the ruling Congress Party and a close associate of Prime Minister Jawaharlal Nehru.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 12, 2013
A Novel Manil Suri W.W. Norton. 400 pp. $26.95 Reviewed by Dawn Fallik There is nothing simple about India. The streets, the caste system, even wrapping a sari delicately requires specific razor-thin folds and a strategic pin. It's as if everything is so delicately balanced, one tiny stumble could spell disaster. Manil Suri walks that fine line in The City of Devi , mixing politics, religion, and pleasure in the most unexpected ways under a threatening cloud of nuclear war. Even the premise of Suri's third novel is both possible and improbable.
NEWS
September 30, 2010 | By Jonathan Zimmerman
I'm a member of an overwhelmingly liberal profession that routinely condemns the growing disparities of wealth in contemporary America. But my own workplace is highly unequal, showering riches on the well-to-do and starving the impoverished. That's right: I'm a university professor. And I'm one of the lucky ones, because I have a full-time appointment. That means I have a real salary, with benefits. Most of the other people who teach at our universities aren't so fortunate.
NEWS
March 24, 2009
New blood for AIG Trudy Rubin has it all wrong ("Don't let outrage at bonuses make a bad economy worse," Sunday). We need to drive the toxic talent out of AIG and other financial institutions that caused the worst economic downturn since the Great Depression. Replace them with the best and brightest MBA graduates looking for jobs with reasonable salaries and modest bonuses for outstanding performance. As far as private investors are concerned, when banks offer to sell toxic assets at significant discounts, the line of private investors ready and willing to write checks will extend from Wall Street to Washington.
NEWS
February 9, 2003 | By Jim Remsen INQUIRER FAITH LIFE EDITOR
The misery that the Rev. Benjamin Chinnappan has seen distresses his musical voice. "According to Hinduism, my people are born at the bottom of society and are much worse than dust," he says with a frown that darkens his cherubic face. Coworkers at Holy Spirit Hospital here know "Father Ben" as their polite chaplain from India, but most don't realize his unusual station in life. He is an Untouchable, a member of a despised "outcaste" in his homeland. Untouchables, known today as Dalits, are a landless people subject to blatant bigotry even in India's Christian world, where millions of Dalits have sought emancipation.
NEWS
July 11, 2002 | By Edward J. Sozanski INQUIRER ART CRITIC
Jaipaul, 74, of Delaware County, a longtime Philadelphia dealer in Indian art who recently made a major gift to the Allentown Art Museum, died of heart failure Friday at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. Jaipaul, who used only one name, operated a gallery in Center City for 20 years. Art dealing, from which he retired in 1997, was his third career. In his native India during the 1950s, he had been a functionary of the ruling Congress Party and a close associate of Prime Minister Jawaharlal Nehru.
NEWS
July 15, 1999 | By Harris Sussman
Hate crimes will continue in the months just before and after 2000. The perpetrators will be Christian, white men. The timing or location will be symbolically patriotic, such as the Independence Day weekend or a federal building. The target will be people who are not white or the government that is blamed for allowing them to become more prominent in the United States. The reason will be that the United States is not a country in which white, Christian male domination is assured.
NEWS
January 21, 1999 | By Gaiutra Bahadur, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
They came to hear an icon speak. And when she did, the message was as unequivocal as the voice that delivered it: "To abandon affirmative action would be like saying there is nothing more to be done about discrimination. " In an address that elicited peals of applause, shouts of support, and a standing ovation from an audience of 1,100 at Camden County College, Coretta Scott King, 71, invoked the past to impeach the present. The widow of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. made clear her position on the struggle over the fate of affirmative action, and she made clear her position on what she called "partisan feuding" in Washington over the fate of President Clinton, who also made an appearance in the Philadelphia region yesterday.
SPORTS
November 19, 1998 | By Ray Parrillo, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The August heat beat down on the Penn State practice field, and weary players looked ahead to the coming season, when they could begin to hit some strangers for a change. For free safety James Boyd, that was too long to wait. The 6-foot, 208-pound sophomore was already in demolition mode. So when teammate Chafie Fields turned his pass route toward the middle of the field, Boyd lined him up and delivered a devastating blow. In the collision, Boyd broke his nose, but Fields, slow to get up, felt worse.
LIVING
January 27, 1998 | By Shankar Vedantam, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
"Walk alone. If they answer not your call, walk alone. " - Rabindranath Tagore in a Bengali song Bhanushankar Dave stood here on April 6, 1930, as Mahatma Gandhi stooped to the ground, picked up some salt, and raised his fist to the sky. At 21, Dave was among the youngest civil resisters on the famous Salt March - a pivotal moment in India's struggle for independence and for nonviolent movements worldwide. The British government's Salt Act had been broken. Gandhi's followers had refused to pay taxes on that most essential seasoning.
NEWS
July 12, 1997 | By David O'Reilly, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
"It will be fine," Nibedita Das insisted over her son's gentle protest. "It will be invisible. " Sthita Das, 20, watched apprehensively as his mother squeezed a white strand of glue onto the tall wooden dome and patted a panel of bright red rayon into place. "There," she said, looking satisfied, and reached for a length of bright ribbon. Gobs of glue seeped through the rayon in several places, but Sthita - a bio-engineering major at the University of Pennsylvania - said nothing.
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