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Casualty

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NEWS
May 14, 1994
Lewis Puller Jr. is dead, yet another casualty of Vietnam. The talented and wise writer, winner of the Pulitzer Prize for biography in 1991, shot himself to death this week. He was 48. As a young marine officer in 1968, Puller stepped on a mine. Both his legs were vaporized. He would live the rest of his life in a wheelchair, plagued with the after-effects of his wounds. Despite all that, he would write his splendid memoir, "Fortunate Son: The Healing of a Vietnam Vet," as a tribute to his distinguished father, Gen. "Chesty" Puller, the most decorated marine in history.
SPORTS
November 25, 2009 | by Paul Domowitch
Through 10 games, the Eagles defense already has had eight starters and key substitutes (nickel linebacker or nickel or dime cornerback) miss a total of 28 games due to injury/suspension. Through 10 games last year, the defense didn't have a single starter or key sub miss a game. A games-missed breakdown of the Eagles' 2009 defense: MLB Stewart Bradley: 10, knee LDE Victor Abiamiri: 3, knee SLB Chris Gocong: 1, quad & hamstring WLB Akeem Jordan: 2, knee FS Macho Harris: 1 ankle MLB Omar Gaither: 7, foot CB Joselio Hanson: 2, suspended CB Ellis Hobbs: 2, neck/spine   Hanging tough   Despite all of its injury problems, the Eagles' defense still has managed to hold eight of its first 10 opponents to 20 or fewer points and is ranked eighth in the league in yards allowed and second in sacks and takeaways.
BUSINESS
April 23, 1991 | by Jenice Armstrong, Daily News Staff Writer
The struggle to cope with hard times has hit many of us. In March, the jobless rate shot up to 6.8 percent, as the number of Americans joining the ranks of the unemployed since last summer swelled to 2 million. It was the sixth straight month that businesses have cut jobs, making it the worst stretch of mass layoffs since the 1981-82 recession, the Labor Department has said. The Daily News is periodically introducing you to Philadelphians who are among the hundreds of thousands of Americans who have been thrown out of work.
BUSINESS
June 15, 1991 | By Jennifer Lin, Inquirer Staff Writer
General Accident Insurance, of Philadelphia, yesterday said it had signed an agreement to buy the property and casualty insurance business of USLICO Corp., of Arlington, Va., for $96.5 million. The purchase will include Hawkeye-Security Insurance Co. and its subsidiaries, Western States Insurance Co. and United Security Insurance Co. The acquisition will be the second major purchase for General Accident in the past year. Last year, the Philadelphia insurer paid $83 million for another property and casualty insurer, Silvey Corp.
NEWS
January 19, 1991 | By Julia M. Klein, Inquirer Staff Writer The Associated Press and Orlando Sentinel also contributed to this article
Lt. Cmdr. Michael Scott Speicher was the first. He was also among the finest. "He's one of those persons who doesn't have an enemy in the world," said Thomas P. Mills, a neighbor who is the godfather of Speicher's two youngsters. Mills then corrected himself. "He had one: He shot his plane down. " A Sunday-school teacher and former college swimming champion, Speicher on Wednesday night became the first American casualty of Operation Desert Storm. He was flying an FA-18 Hornet off the USS Saratoga when his plane was hit by an Iraqi-fired surface-to-air missile.
NEWS
August 26, 2010 | By Jeff Shields, Inquirer Staff Writer
Private ambulance companies will be at the disposal of the municipal 911 system in case of major disasters or "mass casualty incidents," under a program announced by Mayor Nutter on Wednesday. Dispatchers will be able to summon the fleet of 300 private ambulances currently working in the city to aid the fleet of 35 to 50 city medic units that operate at any given time. City officials described it as "a new milestone" in public-private EMS cooperation. With the aid of a $400 state-funded rebate to cover half the cost of each new radio, 80 private vehicles are now capable of communicating with the city's system and being on call as "surge ambulances," as Nutter called them.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 2012
DEAR ABBY : My 18-year-old-daughter, "Olympia," graduated from high school last spring, was accepted to two universities and started her first job. When she lost it recently, she was devastated. Instead of trying to find another one, she decided to turn to prostitution. She said she doesn't want to work her butt off for peanuts. I am extremely frustrated with her decision. I have warned her about the dangers she'll face in that "occupation. " I know she's of age now and needs to make her own choices, but I'm afraid for her and don't want to lose her if we have a huge argument over this.
BUSINESS
October 3, 1995 | By David I. Turner, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Cigna Corp. yesterday said it would restructure its property and casualty unit and take an after-tax charge of $750 million against earnings in an attempt to put an end to longstanding problems with asbestos and environmental claims. As part of the restructuring, Cigna's property and casualty business will be split in two. One unit will handle the old asbestos and environmental claims, but it will sell no new insurance. The other unit will handle new property and casualty business.
BUSINESS
February 14, 1999 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Cigna Corp. is shedding its old dependence on the vagaries of storm, fire and flood, and embracing the surer bets of illness and retirement. Last week, the Philadelphia insurer posted its third straight year of record profits, earning $1.3 billion on $21 billion in revenues. But it was how Cigna earned its money, not how much, that highlights its evolution from a global insurance supermarket into a corporate health- and retirement-benefits giant. During the last three months of 1998, Cigna netted three-quarters of its profits, or $185 million, from its employee life, health-care and disability-benefits business, the company said last week.
NEWS
December 26, 1999 | By Jennifer Lin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The letter from Kosovo was stuffed into the mailbox with the Christmas cards and bills. It was from Joseph Suponcic, 26, to his parents, Edmund and Patricia. Joey, as his family called him, was a Green Beret, assigned to Kosovo in October. He had learned to speak Serbo-Croatian, the Slavic language of Yugoslavia, and was thrilled with his assignment. "They think it's something else to see an American soldier with a Yugoslavian name who speaks their language," he said in the typed letter.
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NEWS
December 8, 2014 | By Chris Hepp, Inquirer Staff Writer
One of the oddest and most frustrating episodes of Philadelphia's long-running governmental soap opera faded to a close Thursday. It did so absent any heroes, with a baffling plot, and its two stars shouting over one another's lines even as the curtain fell. Regardless of who ultimately is deemed at fault, the sorry debacle of the aborted sale of the Philadelphia Gas Works seems a drama fully deserving its scathing reviews and one that has done nothing to enhance the stature either of its lead actors - Mayor Nutter and City Council President Darrell L. Clarke - or the city.
NEWS
September 21, 2014 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
One of the casualties of Syria's civil war is history. Five of the country's six World Heritage sites have "significant damage" and some buildings have been "reduced to rubble," according to a new report that includes work by University of Pennsylvania experts. The report, which was released this week, relied on high-resolution satellite photos to chronicle damage to mosques, Roman buildings, and a Byzantine castle. The Geospatial Technologies and Human Rights Project of the American Association for the Advancement of Science wrote the assessment with help from the Penn Cultural Heritage Center at Penn's Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, the Smithsonian Institution, and the Syrian Heritage Task Force.
NEWS
April 26, 2014 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Staff Writer
LEMOYNE, Pa. - Cure International has long gone where others fear to tread. The global health-care nonprofit has set up clinics in war zones and regions plagued by civil unrest since its founding in 1996, including taking over a bombed-out Red Cross hospital in Kabul, Afghanistan, in 2005. It was there that the group on Thursday suffered its first fatality as a result of violence. As news broke that an Afghan gunman had killed three Americans at the site, the spotlight turned to the group, based in a small office building on a residential street in a borough outside Harrisburg.
NEWS
March 18, 2013 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
Ten years after the invasion of Iraq, it's clear who lost the war that followed. But it may be years before we know if anyone won. Topping the loser's columns, of course, is Saddam Hussein, with the world better for it. Yet, despite his demise, America is also the loser. The goals the Bush administration set for the war were never achievable, and the costs were greater than most Americans realize, not just in lives and money squandered but in reputation lost. Iraqis were freed from Hussein, but a botched American occupation led to a civil war that killed more than 100,000 civilians and forced millions to flee the country.
NEWS
January 18, 2013 | By Aomar Ouali and Paul Schemm, Associated Press
ALGIERS, Algeria - Algerian special forces launched a rescue operation Thursday at a natural gas plant in the Sahara Desert and freed foreign hostages held by al-Qaeda-linked militants, but estimates for the number of dead varied wildly from four to dozens. Militants claiming revenge for France's intervention against rebels in Mali seized the Ain Amenas natural gas complex on Wednesday, taking dozens of foreign workers hostage. Algerian state television said Thursday that four captives - two Britons and two Filipinos - had died.
NEWS
November 11, 2012 | By Louise Esola
One crisp fall morning in 1987, at the dedication of the Philadelphia Vietnam Veterans Memorial, Thomas Corcoran was nearly as heartbroken as he was in June 1969, when two uniformed men knocked on his door in Torresdale. They told him that his son Patrick M. Corcoran, 19, had been killed, and lost at sea. The harsh finality of it all, as 646 Philadelphia families know well, never went away for this grieving father. Crowding the sidewalks near Penn's Landing in 1987, many of those families stood at the newly dedicated memorial to see the names of their boys, their brothers, their fathers etched in stone.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 2012
DEAR ABBY : My 18-year-old-daughter, "Olympia," graduated from high school last spring, was accepted to two universities and started her first job. When she lost it recently, she was devastated. Instead of trying to find another one, she decided to turn to prostitution. She said she doesn't want to work her butt off for peanuts. I am extremely frustrated with her decision. I have warned her about the dangers she'll face in that "occupation. " I know she's of age now and needs to make her own choices, but I'm afraid for her and don't want to lose her if we have a huge argument over this.
NEWS
November 9, 2011 | By Nicole Winfield and Derek Gatopoulos, Associated Press
ROME - Italian Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi conceded Tuesday he no longer had the support to govern and announced he would resign like his Greek counterpart, becoming the biggest political casualty yet of the European debt crisis. Berlusconi promised to leave office after Parliament passes economic reforms the European Union has demanded to keep Italy from sinking into Europe's debt mess. He came to the decision hours after a vote on a routine piece of legislation made it clear he no longer commanded a majority in the lower Chamber of Deputies.
NEWS
October 2, 2011 | By Hadeel Al-Shalchi, Associated Press
TRIPOLI, Libya - The body of a gazelle lies near an empty feeding bin, flies swarming around the corpse. A male lion growls angrily, leaping toward the front of his cage when a rare visitor approaches the bars. This is life in the Tripoli Zoo, which has found itself a casualty of the war to oust Moammar Gadhafi. Once one of the city's best-loved destinations, today it is 110 dusty acres of listless animals and overgrown, sunburned grass. Empty bullet casings are scattered everywhere.
SPORTS
September 19, 2011 | By Francisco Delgado, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Twins, it seems, just can't win for losing. On the heels of losing former MVP Joe Mauer on Friday for the rest of the season because of pneumonia, the team announced Sunday that their other MVP, Justin Morneau , will likely be out for the rest of the season. Morneau has concussion symptoms and a cyst on his left knee that needs to be removed, meaning that the slugger would have played in only 69 games this season. Morneau, who missed two months because of neck surgery, hit .227 with four homers and 30 RBIs.
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