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Cat Food

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LIVING
September 27, 1987 | By Deborah Lawson, Special to The Inquirer
Many readers have reported being disturbed by news reports about cats that suffered ill effects from a deficiency of the chemical compound taurine in their food. Taurine insufficiency has been proved to cause blindness in felines and, according to a study at the University of California at Davis, a serious heart ailment, dilated cardiomyopathy. Scientists at UC now are testing to see whether taurine deficiency could cause reproductive difficulties. When major cat-food producers were informed of the life-threatening ailments caused by low taurine levels, many increased the amount of the substance in their formulas.
BUSINESS
August 17, 1987 | By Neill A. Borowski, Inquirer Staff Writer
Alpo Petfoods Inc. is going to the cats. Dogged by nearly no growth in the canine population and inspired by climbing growth in the cat population, the dog-food manufacturer has begun testing the cat-food market and expects one day to be a large producer. Alpo, a $400 million-a-year company that's been told by parent firm Grand Metropolitan PLC of London to aggressively acquire other companies, also may get into pet-related, non-food products as well as grocery products for humans, company executives say. But that doesn't mean Alpo has turned its back on dogs.
NEWS
September 25, 1988 | By Bob Garfield, Special to The Inquirer
Accordionists, naturally. Also cloggers, contortionists, dulcimer players and leprechauns. Then there's the pizza gourmet with piano, the pipe-smoking dog and the one and only Helmut Kokey, Eastern Michigan's foremost lederhosen- clad yodeler. When it comes to entertainment in and around the Motor City, the Marce Haney Agency has booked them all. "We cover from A to Z in show biz," says Haney, a 27-year veteran of the booking wars. "Whatever you want, we can get it. " Yet with all the amazing talent she has encountered over the years, Haney has never, ever seen anything like Rose Lokey and Katrina, the talking cat. "This animal does talk," the agent says.
FOOD
May 20, 1992 | by Polly Fisher, Special to the Daily News
Dear Polly: One day, I ran out of plastic containers to freeze some leftovers. I looked into the freezer to see what I could take out and use. Then it occurred to me to take the size container I needed, remove the contents (frozen), and rewrap in foil to return to the freezer. I then had a container to use for my new food to be frozen. Now my containers are unlimited. - Carole Dear Polly: A recent suggestion about slightly warming leftover cat food was a good one. However, it won't go far enough to please that finicky cat. Cat food should be removed from the can before storing in the fridge; I use recycled cream-cheese containers.
NEWS
August 26, 2009 | By STEPHANIE FARR, farrs@phillynews.com 215-854-4225
Linda Muchnick sent suicide notes last week to two veterinarians' offices and a medical spa, saying that she could no longer afford to keep up her Harleysville house or care for her dog and 29 cats, prosecutors said. "Basically, the note stated it was best if she killed them along with herself so they could all be in heaven together," Montgomery County Assistant District Attorney Abigail Silverman said yesterday. Towamencin Township police, who responded to Muchnick's home on Thursday, the day her vet received one of the letters, had no idea what to expect when they were forced to knock out an air conditioner and climb in a front window of the house, Chief Paul Dickinson said.
BUSINESS
August 1, 1989 | By Anthony Gnoffo Jr., Inquirer Staff Writer
The Philadelphia advertising agency that persuaded the late Lorne Greene to pitch Alpo dog food has turned to Garfield the cat to star in a costly campaign to introduce Alpo cat food. Alpo Petfoods Inc. of Allentown hopes its new products for cats, with the help of an advertising and promotional campaign by Philadelphia's Weightman Group that will cost $70 million in its first year, will grab a hefty share of the $2.3 billion-a-year cat-food business. Alpo had hoped to keep its plans for entry into the market a secret until later this year, but a pet-food distributor let the cat out of the bag for a Muncie, Ind., newspaper late last week.
NEWS
May 2, 1990 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Don't feed the animals. That's the advice from conservationists, animal experts and city disease- control officials. They're concerned that feeding wild and stray animals may worsen the rabies epidemic that has spread to the Northeast and upset nature's already-precarious environmental balance. But some Northeast residents, particularly those around Pennypack Park, say feeding the animals is harmless, even humane. One elderly couple who live near the park, for instance, have been laying out food for 23 years.
FOOD
September 15, 1993 | By Nathalie Dupree, FOR THE INQUIRER
If I were a cat, I'd like to be my cat. The reason for that is self- evident. There is always cooking going on in my house. If I am not cooking, then someone who works for me is, because we are always testing and retesting recipes, checking them to be sure they are the best they can be. Not only does it smell good, for which Minou (which means "kitten" in French) is appreciative, it tastes good. Although I try to feed her table food or canned food only once a day, scraps from doting colleagues find their way into her bowl.
NEWS
February 15, 1998 | By Peggy Anderson
I'd scarcely sat down to read my Sunday paper when someone knocked at my door: a nice young man I'd never seen, his wife or date on the sidewalk behind him. "Is this your ferret? It was trying to get in your - " Said ferret - a foot-long fur piece, little wider than a ruler - is walking past me into my living room, moving with purpose under my green velvet loveseat and out again, heading across the Oriental toward the skirted ottoman. Although I'm thinking rodents and rabies, and my heart rate has increased, I also know that this must be somebody's pet. I pick it up. In that split second, I become the ferret's friend.
FOOD
September 9, 1992 | by Polly Fisher, Special to the Daily News
Dear Polly: Ladies' nylons have a tendency to dry out, which causes runs. Wash them delicately with shampoo, then rinse with cool water. But don't forget to add the conditioner - just like for human hair fibers! Fill the sink with warm water to open up the fibers, mix in a little conditioner, let soak 5 minutes, then rinse. You will find your nylons not only last longer but feel so smooth on your legs! - Mrs. S.J.W. Dear Polly: The best solution I've found for separating coffee filters: Take a full pack and flip them over.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 2, 2014 | BY MORGAN ZALOT, Daily News Staff Writer zalotm@phillynews.com, 215-854-5928
WHEN JEN Bellot read her little boys a story in last weekend's Daily News about dozens of endangered cats at Pier 70 along the Delaware River in South Philadelphia, 8-year-old Sage and 5-year-old Lior knew just where they wanted some of their Christmas donation money to go. "They had some money to donate, and they wanted to give half to church and half to the cats," Bellot, 36, said yesterday after she and the boys piled into the family minivan...
NEWS
July 16, 2013 | By Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writer
At dusk, they appear: lounging on porches, sprawled across cars, picking through the weeds in abandoned lots in Coatesville. Residents call the situation "torture. " City officials have been swamped with calls. "I couldn't even go in my backyard. You couldn't see nothing but the cats," said Michelle Adderton, of the 700 block of Diamond Street. "I couldn't go out my back door because there were kittens on the porch. " Adderton and other residents of the Chester County city of 13,000 fear that Coatesville is going to the cats.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 2013 | By Leanne Italie, Associated Press
NEW YORK - They frolic in empty boxes and stick their heads under faucet streams of water. They dance on tippy-toes and fly through the air with Pop-Tarts. They play piano wearing little frocks and get tickled to distraction to the delight of millions on YouTube. I speak, of course, of the cat stars of the Internet, a place filled with felines and their wacky uploading humans since the dawn of bandwidth. Now, after years of viral viewing, they're coming into their own in lucrative and altruistic ways.
NEWS
June 15, 2011 | By PHILLIP LUCAS, lucasp@phillynews.com
Police with the PSPCA on Wednesday revisited a house on Chadwick Street in South Philadelphia, where a woman lived without electricity in deplorable conditions with more than 20 sick and malnourished cats. They were trying to determine how many more animals were left inside the home near Passyunk Avenue after the woman, who was reportedly covered with fleas when officials arrived, was hospitalized Sunday. "The house is filled with debris," said Wendy Marano, PSPCA spokeswoman, adding that the house was declared unfit for human habitation.
NEWS
December 25, 2010 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the past, when Theresa Shikitino ran short of cash and kibble, she sometimes fed "mac and meatballs" to Sylvester the cat and Romeo, her Golden Retriever, to make sure they wouldn't go hungry. Her pets are "like family," Shikitino said the other day as she stood in line at the Loaves and Fishes Food Pantry in Prospect Park, in lower Delaware County. The 60-year-old Crum Lynne woman is one of many who have turned to the pantry not only for help putting food on the table, but to help feed beloved animals.
NEWS
August 26, 2009 | By STEPHANIE FARR, farrs@phillynews.com 215-854-4225
Linda Muchnick sent suicide notes last week to two veterinarians' offices and a medical spa, saying that she could no longer afford to keep up her Harleysville house or care for her dog and 29 cats, prosecutors said. "Basically, the note stated it was best if she killed them along with herself so they could all be in heaven together," Montgomery County Assistant District Attorney Abigail Silverman said yesterday. Towamencin Township police, who responded to Muchnick's home on Thursday, the day her vet received one of the letters, had no idea what to expect when they were forced to knock out an air conditioner and climb in a front window of the house, Chief Paul Dickinson said.
NEWS
July 13, 2007 | By Mark E. Liskey
My cat, Jack, is dying of cancer. He has weeks to live. The diagnosis was made at the veterinary hospital at a total cost of slightly more than $1,000. I've been told that I got off easy. Don't get me wrong, I value the diagnosis. It gives me the opportunity to do the right thing - you know, give Jack the "good boy!" chin rub when he wakes me at 2 a.m., rather than the cold shoulder. But a thousand bucks? The pet-supply industry has capitalized on the fact that I project my feelings onto my cat. In other words, they make money when I think Jack is me. ("Shredded Turkey Fare in a Savory Sauce with Garden Greens" cat food sounded great to me. Jack declined.
BUSINESS
May 6, 2006 | By Stacey Burling INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If you make something as mundane as cat food, what do you do to get attention? If you are Meow Mix, you create your own reality show with 10 down-on-their-luck feline contestants from 10 U.S. cities, including Philadelphia. Then you try to find a human to share in the reflected fame. The cats, which will come from shelters or rescue groups, will live in a house designed just for them in New York City with Today-showlike windows. Beginning June 6, they will star in an Internet show where cameras will catch them playing, snoozing and, with luck, lustily eating Meow Mix. Ultimately, edited footage will be used for 10 3- to 5-minute commercials that will run between TV programs or for a 30-minute cable TV show, said Keith Fernbach, public relations director for Grand Central Marketing, which is helping produce the show.
NEWS
January 21, 2004 | By Bonnie L. Cook INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Maybe he missed his furry girlfriend in the old neighborhood. Perhaps a person there had offered him treats. But something possessed Bob and Jody Carbone's cat Scooter to slip out of his new home and make tracks to his old one. He made the 1.5-mile trip not once, but twice. To get from the Carbones' new home in Bala Cynwyd to their old one in Narberth, 11-year-old Scooter had to cross plenty of yards, busy streets and train tracks. How the gray, gold-eyed cat navigated remains unknown.
NEWS
June 3, 2003 | By Wendy Hutson
Last year, the announcement that a McDonald's restaurant would be constructed at the corner of Girard Avenue and 27th Street prompted strong opposition from local civic groups and renewed residents' requests for a supermarket. On May 19, McDonald's Corp. announced that it had canceled its contract for the site. Residents still must depend on corner shops or travel to other neighborhoods. By Wendy Hutson When I moved to Brewerytown three years ago from Mount Airy, it never occurred to me that there would be a problem getting access to food.
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