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Cat Scan

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NEWS
August 1, 1986 | By HOWARD SCHNEIDER, Daily News Staff Writer
Poor Tygger. First Daddy Ed Schwartz gets a law passed in City Council forcing him to get this wicked rabies shot. Then Schwartz puts out a press release telling people to come watch Dr. Orville R. Walls give the shot. And people did come. And took pictures, not just of the shot, but of Tygger getting his teeth checked, and Tygger getting his ears checked and Tygger getting his temperature taken. The cat handled it all with barely a squirm. But it was all for a good cause: publicizing new animal-control laws sponsored by Schwartz.
SPORTS
May 23, 1995 | By Frank Fitzpatrick and Stephen A. Smith, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Lenny Dykstra, who took himself out of Sunday's game with back spasms, underwent a CAT scan yesterday at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital. Phillies physician Phillip Marone said that the results would be available today, but that based on his examination, he did not think the problem was a particularly serious one. "I believe it to be just a muscular problem," said Marone, "but I won't really know for sure until (today). " Dykstra, who has his average up to .304, left the Phillies' win over New York on Sunday when his lower back stiffened.
NEWS
November 7, 1987 | By PAUL BAKER and PAUL MARYNIAK, Daily News Staff Writers
John Martin's last name cost him his life. The Olney man, who had been undergoing alcohol detoxification at the Veterans Medical Center in Coatesville, Chester County, was transferred to the VA hospital in Philadelphia on Wednesday for a CAT scan that was intended for another Coatesville patient of the same name. Immediately after being injected with an iodine dye used for the procedure, Martin, 39, experienced difficulty breathing and required emergency treatment. Eighteen hours later, he was dead.
NEWS
August 8, 1986 | By Rich Heidorn Jr., Inquirer Staff Writer
Common Pleas Court Judge Leon Katz yesterday threw out a $986,000 jury award to a woman who contended that she lost her psychic powers after a CAT scan, saying the verdict was "grossly excessive" and not based on the evidence. Acting on a motion by attorneys for Temple University Hospital, Katz ordered a new trial in the lawsuit by Judith Richardson Haimes. The verdict, which received national attention when it was announced in March, was "so grossly excessive as to shock the court's sense of justice," Katz wrote in an opinion.
NEWS
August 9, 2002
ARE WE outraged about Jason Lucas' being denied a CAT scan because of his size? You bet we are. But not for the reasons outlined by Lucas in yesterday's Daily News. As far as we're concerned, it's his charge of denial of medical care that's outrageous. The decision of Presbyterian Hospital to no longer perform a procedure on a person who exceeded the weight of their machine's capability seems like a sound decision. If the hospital made any mistake, it was breaking the rules in previous years to allow Lucas to have his scan.
NEWS
July 31, 1988 | By Lisa Ellis, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mummy-wrapped, the patient lies flat on his back inside a $1.5 million cylinder that doctors hope will pinpoint a neurological problem by using a magnet 5,000 times the strength of gravity. In the next room, technicians, peering at the patient through sliding-glass windows, check the freeze-frame images of the brain on computer screens. Then, with the touch of a button, they trigger the 6-foot-tall camera that turns the images into photographs. At first glance, this looks like someone receiving a CAT scan, the computerized axial tomography X-ray that almost every hospital has acquired the capability of doing since the scanner was developed about 15 years ago. But many of the pictures are sharper, with the cavities of the brain and various types of tissue, blood and bone clearly distinguishable in shadings of black, white and gray.
SPORTS
March 11, 1994 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
John Kruk, hanging on his wife's left arm, limped up the airport ramp. Beneath a black "Chevy Trucks" cap, his eyes - glassy from the medication that helped him sleep on the 2 1/2-hour flight from Philadelphia yesterday - looked around to see what awaited him. He winced occasionally as he walked, but it was a surgical wound that hurt him now, not the cancerous testicle that was removed less than 48 hours earlier. His spirits, he said, were good. He predicted that he'd be playing baseball in two weeks.
NEWS
January 16, 1988 | By MICHAEL DAYS, Daily News Staff Writer
After recently disclosing that any of 12 workers at two Veterans Hospitals might have prevented a mixup that led to the accidental death of a patient, VA officials promised that the workers faced disciplinary action that could include dismissal. But yesterday, a VA official said the most serious penalty initiated against any of the workers was a 10-day suspension without pay. Three of the workers face a five-day suspension without pay, two others have received reprimands, and five will receive "admonishments," said David Berg, special assistant to the VA director in Philadelphia.
NEWS
September 8, 1986
I would like to commend Judge Leon Katz for rejecting the ridiculous damage award to Judith Haimes, who said that a CAT scan impaired her psychic powers. I certainly wonder by what criteria the jurors reached their decision. Where is their reasoning or common sense? One can lose psychic ability at any time. Surely, if Ms. Haines was psychic at the time she would have sensed a problem with the test. I applaud Judge Katz for his wise decision and integrity. Kathleen Gillespie Croydon.
NEWS
March 27, 1986 | By ANN W. O'NEILL, Daily News Staff Writer
As a psychic, Judith Richardson Haimes led police to missing bodies, making believers out of skeptical officers. But as a plaintiff in civil court in Philadelphia, she was unable to prove she had a case. Common Pleas Judge Leon Katz yesterday dismissed Haimes' claim that a CAT scan performed nearly 10 years ago at Temple University Hospital left her with headaches that made it impossible for her to use her powers. Haimes had contended that the hospital and Dr. Judith Hart, a neuro- radiologist, were negligent in giving her the CAT scan after she told them she was allergic to the dye used in the test.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 6, 2014 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
A city police officer shot and killed a 45-year-old man during a violent confrontation in Northeast Philadelphia, police said. Shortly before 4 p.m. in the 6500 block of Castor Avenue, near Greeby Street, a Second District officer on foot patrol saw a strong-arm robbery of a 35-year-old man on the sidewalk, Chief Inspector Scott Small said. The officer tried to stop and frisk the suspect, and the confrontation "turned into a violent struggle," Small said. The suspect punched the officer several times in the face, Small said.
NEWS
October 6, 2013 | By Dr. Valerianna Amorosa, For The Inquirer
His success in banking had given the 39-year-old some rare opportunities. Of late, he and his family had spent much free time working outside on their exotic sheep farm. During the busy late summer preparing for autumn breeding, he had been working closely with their veterinarian. So that early fall morning when he awoke with a cough - and then started coughing up blood - he didn't think it odd to call the vet first. The vet advised him to see his doctor. A chest X-ray that morning suggested an abnormal circular area on the lung - a "nodule" - that led to a more extensive look with a CAT scan.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 2013 | By Howard Gensler
TIME IS MOVING so quickly these days, we're getting to the point where we're trying to experience things before they happen - the most obvious example being athletes who celebrate victories before they actually . . . win. But there are also trailers that give away the whole movie so you don't need to see it and news stories that predict the future. In this item we'll discuss the notion of a "surprise" appearance. A surprise used to be something you weren't expecting - that scream at a 50th-anniversary party where you prayed the aged honorees wouldn't die of shock right on the spot.
SPORTS
March 1, 2013 | BOB COONEY, Daily News Staff Writer cooneyb@phillynews.com
D OUG COLLINS' meeting with the media following Tuesday's embarrassing, 98-84 loss to the Orlando Magic has attracted more attention than all the news conferences Andy Reid had in his 14 seasons with the Eagles. Collins left little to the imagination, so here's a look at all that he said: (Opening statement) I sure didn't see this effort coming. I thought we played incredibly hard against Miami, incredibly hard in New York on Sunday. This is mind-numbing to me. We went up, 29-20, and, from that point on, I couldn't even tell you what occurred.
SPORTS
February 28, 2013 | BY BOB COONEY, Daily News Staff Writer cooneyb@phillynews.com
IF THE 76ERS are feeling the pressure of the desperate times that are upon them, they certainly are masking it well. With a four-game deficit staring at them for the eighth and final postseason spot in the East and the lowly Orlando Magic providing the competition Tuesday, it would have seemed to have been the perfect time to start the stampede toward the playoffs. Instead, the Sixers looked more like a team playing out the string in losing their sixth in a row, this time by 98-84.
SPORTS
February 5, 2013
Charlotte Bobcats rookie Michael Kidd-Gilchrist suffered a concussion in Saturday's fourth-quarter collision with teammate Jeff Taylor in Houston. The Camden native, the second overall pick in last year's draft, went up to defend Toney Douglas' layup attempt early in the fourth quarter on Saturday night. Taylor swooped in and his right hip connected with the back of Kidd-Gilchrist's head. Kidd-Gilchrist lay motionless for several minutes. The athletic training staffs from both teams came out to check on him, and the entire Charlotte bench eventually surrounded him. Medical personnel fit Kidd-Gilchrist with a neck brace.
NEWS
November 2, 2012 | BY ADAM ZAKHEIM
YOUNG AMERICANS have a lot at stake in Tuesday's presidential election, but nothing is more important than ensuring enactment of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. Mentioned repeatedly during the first two presidential debates, "Obamacare" is now the subject of intense, and annoying, campaign advertisements. But lost amid all this ominous talk of mandates, fines and government takeovers is a clear understanding of the ACA's many benefits to those of us under 40. I hope the possibility of a potential Romney administration repealing the ACA elicits serious concern, because the ACA is vital to the health of our country.
SPORTS
September 3, 2012
Jacksonville Jaguars running back Maurice Jones-Drew, the NFL's leading rusher in 2011, ended his holdout on Sunday - and he isn't sorry about taking the 38-day break. "I did something I felt was right, and I'm always going to feel right," the pocket powerhouse said. "And that's why I can come back and not have a negative attitude. I think if you regret things, you're going to come back salty, be a distraction, things like that. " (Our new motto: Never be salty.) After a 40-minute talk with coach Mike Mularkey, MJD answered media questions about his holdout for half an hour.
NEWS
August 6, 2012 | By Monica Yant Kinney, Inquirer Columnist
Cecilia Ready lives up to her name. We'd just started talking about what it's like to be a 70-year-old adjunct professor working through a third bout of cancer when Ready's tongue grew heavy and she began slurring her words. "Come," she insists calmly after calling her doctor, "we'll do the interview in the E.R. " I hesitate, but am assured by her colleagues in the English department at St. Joseph's University that Ready's unbridled determination is not a reaction to chemo or steroids.
SPORTS
March 25, 2011 | By Bob Brookover, Inquirer Staff Writer
CLEARWATER, Fla. - Roy Oswalt knows he was lucky and unlucky in the same instant. He was lucky because the line drive off the bat of Tampa Bay's Manny Ramirez in the fourth inning of Wednesday's Grapefruit League game against the Rays did not leave the Phillies righthander more seriously hurt. Oswalt, struck on the neck just below his right ear, had a former teammate who was not nearly as fortunate. "I actually had a good friend [who] got hit in the neck - Mike Coolbaugh - that used to play with us with the Astros," Oswalt said Thursday.
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