CollectionsCatch 22
IN THE NEWS

Catch 22

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
November 1, 1986
The Oct. 18 Op-ed Page column by Norman Podhoretz missed the point. He questioned the recent celebration of the 25th anniversary of Catch-22, a satiric novel by Joseph Heller. It is apparent that Mr. Podhoretz thinks the book deserves no honor, particularly not by the Air Force Academy. The Air Force is portrayed in the book as "an organization run by idiots and lunatics who send countless young boys to their deaths for no reason other than the furthering of their own personal ambitions.
NEWS
October 18, 1986 | By Norman Podhoretz
When I first heard that the Air Force Academy was planning a conference to celebrate the 25th anniversary of the publication of Catch-22, I thought the academy must be playing some kind of joke to get even with Joseph Heller's cruel satire of its own branch of the service. But as it turned out, the only joke the academy was playing was on itself - and on the United States of America. The Air Force, as portrayed in this novel which the Air Force has just honored, is an organization run by idiots and lunatics who send countless young boys to their deaths for no reason other than the furthering of their own personal ambitions.
LIVING
February 17, 1994 | By Sue Chastain, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER This story contains information from the Associated Press, the Washington Post and USA Today
You thought you'd never see another book like Joseph Heller's classic, Catch-22? Think again. Heller has written a sequel to the 1961 work - Closing Time - and Simon & Schuster is expected to have it in bookstores this fall, the New York Times reported yesterday. "The book and its title come directly from my stage in my career and my stage in life," Heller told the Times. "It occurred to me that it might be a good idea to write about some of the characters of Catch-22, blend them in with a number of new characters and infuse it with my new experiences since World War II. " Closing Time does not continue where Catch-22 left off - in the Mediterranean during the final months of World War II - but is set in present- day New York.
BUSINESS
November 10, 1991 | By Robert A. Rankin and Charles Green, Inquirer Washington Bureau
The sputtering economy has plunged President Bush into a Catch-22 trap. The worse the economy gets, the more pressure Bush faces to do something to fix it. But whatever he tries - Catch-22 - is likely to make things worse. Bush is trapped by this year's record $350 billion budget deficit, by the Democrats' control of Congress, by the timing of the recovery from recession and of the 1992 election, and by financial markets that are intensely aware of those other traps. "I would say he's between a rock and a hard place," said Robert Brusca, chief economist for Nikko Securities Co. in New York.
NEWS
October 2, 1994 | By Carlin Romano, Inquirer Book Critic
CLOSING TIME By Joseph Heller Simon & Schuster. 464 pp. $24 In an era when conglomerates bankroll follow-ups to classic novels like Wuthering Heights and Gone With the Wind, then hire the writer after a high- profile search, it takes chutzpah to write the sequel to your own book. Score one for Joseph Heller, author of the epochal Catch-22 (1961), now finally tying up the strings of his renowned black comedy in Closing Time (which he describes as more a "completion" than a sequel)
NEWS
December 14, 1999 | By Carlin Romano, INQUIRER BOOK CRITIC
There is only one catch to life - you eventually die. Joseph Heller, the snowy-haired, wisecracking Brooklyn-born novelist whose anti-war classic, Catch-22 (1961), rocketed its title into a catchphrase for paradoxical fixes in which one loses no matter what, died Sunday of a heart attack at his East Hampton, Long Island home. He was 76. "He was a wonderful writer," Norman Mailer, a contemporary of his, said yesterday, "and there aren't that many left. " "Oh, God, how terrible," exclaimed author and friend Kurt Vonnegut, who last spoke to Heller a week ago. "This is a calamity for American letters.
NEWS
November 29, 1986 | By David Bianculli, Inquirer TV Critic
Channel 3's annual Children's Telethon, despite its good intentions, pre- empts what would have been tonight's best TV offering: NBC's Jack Paar Comes Home. DAYTIME HIGHLIGHTS LITTLE EARS: THE VELVETEEN RABBIT (10 a.m., Ch. 12) - VCR alert: This pilot for a PBS children's series is a lovely addition to any family's videotape collection. George Winston's music and Meryl Streep's narration enhance the original illustrations to this lovely story. WONDERWORKS: ANNE OF GREEN GABLES (5 p.m., Ch. 12)
NEWS
December 15, 1999
In the year 3000, when they dig up time capsules from a millennium before, they will ask, "What was it like to be alive back then? What was life in the United States and the world like?" Here's hoping that time capsule contains Catch-22 by Joseph Heller, who died Tuesday at 76 of a heart attack. If any novel can tell them, Catch-22 can. Mr. Heller, a bombardier during World War II, turned that experience into one of the funniest and most horrifying of artworks, and easily the best American novel to come out of that war. Set on the island of Pianosa, the novel presented the ultimate satire on the organization man, the unthinking patriot, the pretentious overling, the murderous machinery of power.
NEWS
June 15, 2010 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Anglo-American polemicist, literary critic, and political wag Christopher Hitchens has been called, usually to his great dismay, America's last public intellectual, a contrarian who philosophizes with a hammer, and a political gadfly. Hitchens, whose books include Thomas Jefferson: Author of America and God Is Not Great: How Religion Poisons Everything , will discuss his new tome, Hitch-22: A Memoir , Tuesday night at 7:30 at the Free Library of Philadelphia's Central Library, 1901 Vine St. On Monday, while waiting for a flight to Miami at Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport in Arlington, Va., Hitchens, 61, talked by cell phone about his life, his politics, and his distaste for religion.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 14, 2013
Fans of Joseph Heller's Catch-22 can't help but hear an echo of the novel's plot in the real-life drama playing out over the leak of information about massive U.S. government spying programs. The admitted whistle-blower, former National Security Agency contract worker Edward Snowden, apparently exposed the NSA's telephone and Internet data-gathering in an attempt to trigger a public debate about the extent to which our privacy has been compromised in the name of national security.
NEWS
October 4, 2012 | BY WILL BUNCH, Daily News Staff Writer
OK, WE ALREADY know that Mitt Romney is no Jack Kennedy, but neither is President Obama. We know that they're both likable enough, that their campaigns sometimes remind us of that ad, "Where's the beef," that neither is going to exploit his opponent's youth and inexperience, and that the Soviet Union does not dominate Eastern Europe (anymore). So, going into Wednesday's overhyped political Super Bowl of a presidential debate in Denver, it might be good if you ask yourself: Will Romney - behind in the polls in key battleground states - be better off if he hits Obama with a memorable "zinger"?
TRAVEL
February 5, 2012 | By Christopher Elliott, TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES
Question: I'm an Indian national residing in the United States. I was scheduled to fly from Houston to Mumbai on British Airways recently. My itinerary involved a short stopover in London. In Houston, while checking in with British Airways, I was denied boarding because my work visa was not stamped in my passport. The original visa stamped in my passport had expired and I was traveling to India in order to get my renewed visa stamped at the U.S. consulate in Mumbai. I was carrying an application that permits me to continue living and working legally in the U.S. and to travel abroad.
NEWS
October 28, 2011 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON - Today's record-low mortgage rates are out of reach for millions of U.S. homeowners who would benefit from them most. One in four homeowners with a mortgage - 11 million people - owe more than their home is worth. These "underwater" borrowers have virtually no shot at refinancing and their plight is a drag on the housing market and the broader economy. The Obama administration is hoping at least 1 million of these borrowers will take advantage of its refinancing program under more lenient rules unveiled Monday.
BUSINESS
September 25, 2011 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
The normal tug-of-war between a pharmaceutical company and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration over approval for a drug has been turned on its side with midodrine, a medicine that helps about 100,000 patients a year avoid the potential dangers of low blood pressure. Shire Pharmaceuticals Inc., with U.S. headquarters in Wayne, no longer makes the drug, but it wants the FDA to give final approval of midodrine to lift a regulatory cloud. Barring that, it wants the FDA to approve Shire's plan for new trials or hold a hearing that might kill the drug.
SPORTS
January 12, 2011
"Voting shall be based upon the player's record, playing ability, integrity, sportsmanship, character and contributions to the team(s) on which the player played. " - Baseball Hall of Fame Instruction to Voters THE "INTEGRITY, sportsmanship, character" determination has become the Catch-22 of the annual BBWAA election of eligible former players to the Hall of Fame. That's Catch-22, as in catch 22 guys who used performanc-enhancing drugs during their careers and triple that number will go uncaught.
NEWS
June 15, 2010 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Anglo-American polemicist, literary critic, and political wag Christopher Hitchens has been called, usually to his great dismay, America's last public intellectual, a contrarian who philosophizes with a hammer, and a political gadfly. Hitchens, whose books include Thomas Jefferson: Author of America and God Is Not Great: How Religion Poisons Everything , will discuss his new tome, Hitch-22: A Memoir , Tuesday night at 7:30 at the Free Library of Philadelphia's Central Library, 1901 Vine St. On Monday, while waiting for a flight to Miami at Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport in Arlington, Va., Hitchens, 61, talked by cell phone about his life, his politics, and his distaste for religion.
BUSINESS
November 17, 2009 | By Jane M. Von Bergen INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
On the same day the U.S. Labor Department reported that the unemployment rate had reached a landmark 10.2 percent, President Obama signed a law extending unemployment benefits by up to 20 weeks in some states, including Pennsylvania and New Jersey. "I was so relieved," said Dawn Brown, 41, a mother of two from North Wales who lost her market-data research job in June. "It just took all the worry away. " But the new law won't help Brown at all - or anybody else who has been laid off since late June.
NEWS
January 6, 2006 | By ANDREW BORENE
THE FIGHT in Iraq has not been going as smoothly as originally advertised by the White House. An expanding insurgency has been noted for two years by military leaders on the ground, was predicted by the CIA, and even the president has now acknowledged an organized resistance. Turning past stories about federal indictments, appointments and espionage on the front pages in the last few weeks, you might have seen continued partisan rhetoric promoting an immediate withdrawal from Iraq while the president wants to keep the status quo. Neither course works.
SPORTS
October 24, 2005 | By Kevin Tatum and Mike Jensen INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
It was August 2004, and while schools around the country were finalizing their football schedules for 2005, Temple athletic director Bill Bradshaw and his program were in limbo. The Owls' membership in the Big East Conference was to run out at the end of the season, and a university task force was weighing whether Temple would continue playing football - and at what level. "The institution said to me that we're not going to be able to sign any agreements until the board of trustees determines what we're going to do with football," Bradshaw said in a recent interview.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|