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ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 2011 | By Nekesa Mumbi Moody, Associated Press
NEW YORK - Men and women will compete head-to-head, some of the more exotic awards such as best Native American album and best spoken-word children's record have been eliminated, and the number of categories has been reduced by more than 30 in the biggest overhaul in the 53-year history of the Grammys. While no musical genres will be excluded from Grammy contention, the changes will make the awards a lot more competitive. "It ups the game in terms of what it takes to receive a Grammy and preserves the great esteem in which it's held in the creative community, which is the most important element," Neil Portnow, chief executive of the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences, said in a telephone interview Wednesday.
NEWS
April 28, 1991 | By Mary Anne Janco, Special to The Inquirer
Dave Gibboni's family and friends always knew he would be the perfect Jeopardy! contestant. And Wednesday night, he proved them right. Gibboni, 30, of Drexel Hill, a research chemist, successfully auditioned last fall for the television game show and headed to the Hollywood studio in February. As the taped show aired Wednesday night, dozens of Gibboni's friends gathered around the television sets at his home to cheer their host to victory. Gibboni admitted that he got off to a slow start.
NEWS
December 14, 2000 | By Melanie D. Scott, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
A Burlington County Superior Court judge ruled yesterday that the Lenape Regional High School District must revise its advertisement for construction bids for a high school in Tabernacle. Judge John A. Sweeney ruled that the district must make sure it receives bids in five categories specified under state law instead of splitting them into 11 categories. Lawyers for the Building Contractors Association of New Jersey and the school district appeared in court Tuesday. The association challenged the district's advertisement, saying the 11 categories might give more companies a chance to bid but would discourage general contractors.
NEWS
October 26, 1995
Social structure and culture do not arrange themselves in artificial if convenient packages which fit the decades. Or the centuries. Or the millennia. We think this is 1995 only because the monk who produced the current calendar made a five-year mistake. Actually this is the year 2000. Only journalists and those who look to them for historical perspective think that decades or centuries or millennia are appropriate categories for understanding changes among humankind and human society.
NEWS
February 13, 1991 | Special to The Inquirer / DAVID M. WARREN
AT THE DEPTFORD MALL, Camden County Vo-Tech freshman Renee Busch of Pennsauken displays her winning entry in one of the six categories of a flower show sponsored by the vo-tech's ornamental-horticulture students. The show opened Friday.
NEWS
December 31, 1986 | By Walter F. Roche Jr., Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
State Public Welfare Department officials say the error rate for a major cash assistance program has been substantially reduced, but the claim is based on incomplete data. In a report filed this month with the state General Assembly, state Public Welfare Secretary Walter W. Cohen said there had been a "dramatic improvement" in the error rate for the $270 million-a-year General Assistance (GA) program. The error rate, which must be computed annually under state law, is a measure of the percentage of GA cases in which errors were made in computing recipients' monthly grant or determining the eligibility of applicants.
SPORTS
March 31, 2011
Here is where Carlos Ruiz ranks on the list of all-time Phillies hitters in categories in which he qualifies: 76th: Walks (193). 78th: Doubles (98). 99th: Home runs (30). 107th: Strikeouts (188). 113th: RBIs (191). 115th: Games (487). 129th: Total bases (577). 131st: At-bats (1,456). 136th: Hits (379). 141st: Runs (169). 278th: Triples (5).
SPORTS
March 7, 1997 | by Bernard Fernandez, Daily News Sports Writer
Joe Frazier, Larry Holmes, Thomas Hearns, Carmen Basilio and Willie Pep are expected to be on hand for The Ring's 75th anniversary weekend celebration, which begins today and runs through Sunday at Bally's Park Place in Atlantic City. The highlight of the anniversary weekend will be an awards banquet tomorrow at 8 p.m., hosted by ESPN's Al Bernstein, in which boxing's "best of the best" over the past 75 years will be honored. The winners in each category were selected by editors of The Ring and will be announced at the banquet.
NEWS
March 16, 2000 | By Marc Levy, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Three bidders on separate projects in an $18.1 million expansion and renovation for Rancocas Valley Regional High School have sued the district, delaying an award until at least late this month. The companies bid in three of the five project categories - general contracting, ventilation and plumbing. They sued the district in Burlington County Superior Court after a second round of bids was rejected in February for coming in about $400,000 over budget. In all, there were about 25 bids in the five categories.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
January 17, 2014 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Inquirer Columnist
College students and parents looking for financial aid, listen up: The Free Application for Federal Student Aid, also known as the FAFSA, has changed this year. The form still asks for information about income, assets, and family size - but with a twist. Schools use the FAFSA form to calculate a family's eligibility for federal aid, as well as many state and private aid programs. What's new this year? The FAFSA form collects financial information from dependent students' legal parents - regardless of their marital status or gender, if those parents live together.
NEWS
January 3, 2013 | By Jennifer Lin, Inquirer Staff Writer
You'd think it was Santa Claus and his elves standing at Broad Street and Washington Avenue and not Misses P., a.k.a. Nathan Walk, and other members of the Drag Brigade. Everyone wanted a photo with the 10 ladies - a mother who eagerly foisted her toddler into Misses P.'s arms; two police officers; and multiple Mummers with painted faces. "I'm really having a great time," beamed Stella D'oro, Tim Johnson's alter ego, who was dressed as a Pan Am stewardess. In the world of Mummery, this was history.
SPORTS
December 28, 2012 | By FRANK SERAVALLI, Daily News Staff Writerseravaf@phillynews.com
WHEN THE NFL announced its Pro Bowl rosters on Wednesday night, Eagles kicker Alex Henery contemplated with curiosity. "I watched with outside hope," Henery admitted. "I kind of figured it wasn't going to come, though. " Aside from guard Evan Mathis, whom offensive coordinator Marty Mornhinweg called the "last man standing" on the Birds' battered offensive line, Henery figured to be the Eagles' best shot at a Pro Bowl nod. Henery, 25, was the Eagles' most valuable player on offense this season.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 2012 | By Ron Charles, Washington Post
Stories about the Iraq War hold a prominent place in this year's National Book Award nominations. The Yellow Birds , a debut novel by Iraq vet Kevin Powers, and Billy Lynn's Long Halftime Walk , by Ben Fountain, are among the five finalists for the fiction award. Both novels are powerful tales about soldiers coming back from battle. This year's finalist authors are a star-studded group notable for their critical and popular success, although major novels from Richard Ford, Michael Chabon, and Barbara Kingsolver are absent from the list.
NEWS
June 14, 2012 | By Christine Armario, Associated Press
When those college tuition bills come in, be prepared for sticker shock - especially at Penn State. The average tuition at a four-year public university climbed 15 percent between 2008 and 2010, fueled by state budget cuts for higher education and increases of 40 percent and more at universities in states like Georgia, Arizona, and California. The U.S. Department of Education's annual look at college affordability also found significant price increases at the nation's private universities, including at for-profit institutions, where the net price for some schools is now twice as high as Harvard's.
NEWS
May 15, 2012 | By Claudia Vargas, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Any hope of burnishing the beleaguered Camden City School District's image before Superintendent Bessie LeFra Young's imminent departure seemed to disappear Monday when the state Department of Education's revised "Quality Single Accountability Continuum" performance review's findings became public. The scores show the district still failing in virtually all categories. The district had appealed the initial QSAC report of early February that gave the district failing grades in four of the five categories — instruction and program (7 percent)
NEWS
April 25, 2012 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
  An American Lung Association report on the nation's air quality has turned up a puzzling blip: In this heavily urbanized region, comparatively rural Chester County has the highest annual average for fine-particle pollution - the sooty stuff that carries chemical pollutants and lodges deep in the lungs. However, the county still meets air quality standards for the pollutant. It's one of many seeming dichotomies found in the report, which is to be released today. Overall, the air we breathe is getting much better.
NEWS
April 13, 2012
The Inquirer won the 2012 Keystone Press Award Sweepstakes Division I with eight first-place wins, including top prize in investigative reporting for "Assault on Learning," an exposé of violence in Philadelphia schools. The Inquirer has won the honor for the best among the state's largest newspapers in four of the last six years, most recently in 2011. The award was based on total winnings - eight first places, seven seconds, and five honorable mentions. The annual awards were announced Thursday by the Pennsylvania Press Association, which honors journalistic excellence by Pennsylvania newspapers.
SPORTS
February 13, 2012 | By Megan Soisson, For The Inquirer
I'm a journalist. And for at least the next 16 months, I am also a student. But to be honest, as a sports editor at the Daily Pennsylvanian, Penn's independent student-run newspaper, it's difficult to turn off my journalism mind and turn on my classroom mind. I spend 18 hours a day on this balance beam between school, friends, and the DP. So it was nothing far from the norm when Tuesday afternoon, instead of putting my full focus into a discussion on perceptions of risk in health, my attention was set on figuring out why Friday's Penn-Harvard men's basketball game was not in ESPN3's broadcast schedule.
NEWS
February 9, 2012 | BY JONATHAN TAKIFF, takiffj@phillynews.com215-854-5960
Given that Kanye West is up twice for best rap album (alone and with his bud, Jay Z), he probably won't be throwing one of his famous temper tantrums this Sunday night on national TV (CBS, 8 to 11:30 p.m.) But don't be surprised if somebody else jumps out of the audience at the 54th annual Grammy Awards to loudly protest "we've been robbed. " For certain, protest activities are planned for outside L.A.'s Staples Center on Sunday. There'll also be an anti-Grammy concert (Latin Jazz)
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