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NEWS
January 22, 2015 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
With Pope Francis coming in September to Philadelphia, 2015 looks to be a year for Catholics across the region to wear their faith proudly and publicly. But catching a glimpse of Francis on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway at the World Meeting of Families won't put food on the table at local soup kitchens, or pay for the church's schools for blind or mentally retarded children, or provide health care to its retired priests. For that and more, the Archdiocese of Philadelphia relies on its annual Catholic Charities appeal, Archbishop Charles J. Chaput told a news conference Tuesday, announcing that he had set a goal of $10 million for this year.
NEWS
April 4, 2004 | By Rosalee Polk Rhodes INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
When Peter O'Connor accepts his award at the first Justice for All awards ceremony to be held by Catholic Charities, Diocese of Camden, this month, he will do so with trepidation. O'Connor, 62, will receive the social-justice award for his work in bringing affordable housing to low-income people throughout the region. O'Connor, who believes the battle for equitable housing and racial equality is far from over, said he would "try to promote the award as an appeal for this work.
NEWS
December 1, 1995 | By Rebecca Goldsmith, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Come next year, the Delaware House's name may be as close as it gets to the river. Officials broke ground yesterday on a four-acre plot in Westampton, the future site of a $2.4 million mental-health facility scheduled to open in September. Delaware House Mental Health Services will vacate its Burlington City headquarters, an 1840s Victorian mansion with riverfront views, which it has occupied since its inception 24 years ago. The agency employs roughly 70 people and draws about 130 clients each day. Run by Catholic Charities, the Delaware House offers outpatient services to seriously mentally ill adults in Burlington County.
NEWS
November 21, 1994 | By Rebecca Goldsmith, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The 15-year-old township boy with the cap covering his overgrown strawberry-blonde hair said he had sexually assaulted his little sister for two years. The 16-year-old from Ewing with the close-cropped afro and big, brown eyes said he had touched his 13-year-old victim over her clothing in the summer of 1993. During a regular weekly session, there would be five or six other boys around the Formica table, talking about their own crimes - rape, incest, anal and oral intercourse, and other sexual contact.
NEWS
August 8, 1993 | By Nicholas Wishart, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Catholic Charities, a social service agency serving financially strapped families, has received a $100,000 state grant to extend temporary shelter to the working poor. With the grant from the Department of Community Affairs, announced last month, the Emergency Services section of Catholic Charities plans later this summer to begin providing six transitional houses for low-income families in Burlington County. The housing units will be added to 10 that already exist for welfare recipients in the county.
NEWS
August 26, 2004 | By Frank Kummer INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In past years, hundreds of working-poor families have turned to Catholic Charities in Delanco for backpacks loaded with school supplies. This year, the agency's Emergency Services Division says it is able to supply backpacks at only one-fourth the rate of last year because donations are so low - and it is stumped. Food supplies are also way down. "In Burlington County, we're seeing over 500 families a month for food, and it seems the need is increasing," said Donna Boone, who runs the office on Burlington Avenue.
NEWS
November 16, 2001 | By Will Van Sant INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Catholic Charities in the Diocese of Camden is short of holiday donations and is requesting turkeys, new toys and nonperishable food to distribute to needy families for Thanksgiving and Christmas. "We need donations desperately," said Suzanne Hemp, executive director for Catholic Charities, "specifically in Camden. " Hemp attributed the shortage to an increase in requests for help due to a shrinking economy and an 18 percent decrease in charitable giving to her group in the last year.
NEWS
December 2, 1988 | By Dorothy G. Wegard and Rebecca Barnard, Special to The Inquirer
John Patrick McGarvey, 60, of Moorestown, a coordinator of the Job Training Partnership Act in Burlington County, died of leukemia Wednesday at Memorial Hospital of Burlington County in Mount Holly. "He was very concerned with helping those who needed help, for whom maybe lady luck wasn't so kind . . .," said his wife, Jeannine. "Whenever anyone asked him for his time, he always found that time. " The father of seven, Mr. McGarvey was a founding trustee of Burlington County Birthright and a member of the advisory committee of the Burlington County Special Services School District.
NEWS
January 4, 2000 | By Louise Harbach, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Frank Helverson could be considered an anomaly. While many people switch employers every few years, Helverson has had the same employer - Catholic Charities - for 30 years. In October 1969, he was appointed supervisor of the Burlington branch of what was then called the Catholic Welfare Bureau. The Willingboro resident now heads Catholic Charities' Burlington County Behavior Health Care Division. In December, the charitable group cited Helverson for his three decades of service.
NEWS
May 21, 1986 | By JIM NICHOLSON, Daily News Staff Writer
Herman J. Obert, an attorney for nearly 50 years, died Monday. He was 75 and lived in Bryn Mawr. A Philadelphia lawyer who specialized in probate, charitable trusts and construction, he was a member of the firm of Monteverde, Hemphill, Maschmeyer & Obert. He previously had been a member in the firm of Gibbons, Eustace & Obert. He was active in the Catholic Charities organization and represented a number of orders and societies. The son of a Roxborough brewer, Obert was educated at Georgetown Preparatory School and was a graduate of Georgetown University and Temple University Law School.
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NEWS
January 22, 2015 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
With Pope Francis coming in September to Philadelphia, 2015 looks to be a year for Catholics across the region to wear their faith proudly and publicly. But catching a glimpse of Francis on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway at the World Meeting of Families won't put food on the table at local soup kitchens, or pay for the church's schools for blind or mentally retarded children, or provide health care to its retired priests. For that and more, the Archdiocese of Philadelphia relies on its annual Catholic Charities appeal, Archbishop Charles J. Chaput told a news conference Tuesday, announcing that he had set a goal of $10 million for this year.
NEWS
April 27, 2014
Goodwill ambassador on a bus We visited beautiful Philadelphia for the first time recently and had a wonderful time. Of course, we stopped at the usual tourist sites and gained a sense of immediacy about American history. The tourism center was helpful, and the bus system was easy to use thanks to helpful bus drivers. The Rosenbach Museum and Library is phenomenal, and we could easily have spent days browsing in the Book Trader, where the staff seems to know every book on every shelf.
NEWS
October 21, 2013 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
Born in a refugee camp in Thailand, Kyaw Kyaw did his homework in a candlelit hut. Books were shared. Paper was precious, too. There are no candles but plenty of books, paper, and power at the Oaklyn Public School, where 11-year-old Kyaw Kyaw (sounds like cha cha ) is thriving in sixth grade. "He's better here," says his uncle, Kai Zu, who, like Kyaw, left a refugee camp for the United States in 2009 and lives in a borough apartment. "It's wonderful. " Twenty-two students whose families fled Burma, the troubled Southeast Asian nation also known as Myanmar, are enrolled at Oaklyn's sole school, a weathered but well-kept structure built on Kendall Boulevard in 1926.
NEWS
January 6, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Thomas C. Kempin, 94, of Mayfair, the civilian executive to the commander of the Frankford Arsenal for 20 years, died Thursday, Dec. 27, at Nazareth Hospital of complications from a stroke. Until he retired in June 1973, Mr. Kempin was the civilian executive under a dozen different commanders at the arsenal in Northeast Philadelphia. The post was the highest available to civilians there. In 34 years at the arsenal, he started as an apprentice with an education at North Catholic High School and worked his way up through the machine shop into management.
NEWS
June 3, 2012 | By Joe Watkins
Last month, Catholic archdioceses and institutions across the nation filed lawsuits against the Department of Health and Human Services for its overreaching mandate announced earlier this year. The mandate would force church-affiliated hospitals, agencies, and universities to pay for services that violate their faith (such as contraception, sterilization, and abortion-inducing drugs) as part of the health insurance they provide employees. If these groups do not comply, they will incur large penalties that may ultimately force many to close.
NEWS
February 19, 2012 | By Dick Polman, For The Inquirer
It's hard to fathom why the Republicans would want to launch a sustained assault on birth control, align themselves with the most conservative voices in the Catholic Church, and thereby risk alienating women voters in November. But, hey, if that's how they want to play it, President Obama is only too happy to reap the benefits. I've been puzzled for weeks by all the talk about how Obama has supposedly blown it with Catholic voters after requiring that many Catholic institutions offer free birth control in their employee insurance plans.
NEWS
February 12, 2012 | By Christi Parsons, Kathleen Hennessey, and Noam N. Levey, Tribune Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - For days, President Obama had been hammered over a regulation in the health-care law that required religiously affiliated hospitals, charities, and universities to provide birth control for their female employees even if that conflicted with church teachings. On Friday, he tried to end the debate with what he called an "accommodation. " The employees still will be offered free birth-control coverage, but the benefit will come directly from their insurers, and no religious groups' money will be used.
NEWS
February 10, 2012
I'M NOT a perfect Catholic. When Mrs. Paul had a monopoly on meatless Fridays, I sometimes managed to get my hands on a burger. Once, at confession, I lied about a sin, which must amount to purgatorial perjury. I've missed Mass, sassed the sisters behind their backs (I'm irreverent, not stupid) and think that papal annulments are just another way to spell D-I-V-O-R-C-E. And you might be surprised to learn that I have no problem with artificial birth control, at least the kind that isn't "abortion in a pill.
NEWS
December 20, 2011
Albert Rusko, 86, of Oxford Circle, a retired computer engineer, died of complications from sepsis Thursday, Dec. 15, at Aria Health-Torresdale Campus. Mr. Rusko, whose parents emigrated from what is now Slovakia, grew up in Port Richmond and graduated from North Catholic High School. At 17, he joined the Army. He served in the South Pacific in World War II and saw action in the Philippines. After his discharge, he earned an associate's degree from Temple University and then joined Burroughs Corp.
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