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NEWS
December 2, 1990 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
Kathleen Widmayer vividly remembers the first day of her freshman theology class in the autumn of 1970 at what was then St. Joseph's College. A veteran Jesuit priest who was teaching the course strode into the classroom and gave his customary greeting: "Good morning, gentlemen. " "And then he looked at me and he realized that it wasn't going to work anymore," Widmayer, of Maple Shade, recalled last week. It was a small but telling example of the fundamental change that the first 195 female students witnessed that fall when St. Joseph's went coed.
NEWS
March 19, 2001 | By James M. O'Neill INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When Georgetown University recently selected its first lay president, some in the Catholic academic community were startled. Georgetown, after all, is the nation's oldest Catholic university, and considered the flagship among the nation's 28 Jesuit colleges. Some worried that Georgetown's decision to be the first Jesuit school with a lay president would erode the university's Catholic flavor and Jesuit identity. But the move, far from unusual, is becoming a practical imperative at many Catholic colleges, including some in the Philadelphia region.
NEWS
September 11, 2015 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Learning that the university she was about to lead faced a deficit equal to nearly 10 percent of its operating budget, Colleen M. Hanycz knew it was time for "crisis triage. " Hanycz, who became president of La Salle University in July, oversaw 23 layoffs, about the same number of buyouts of longtime employees, a major reduction in employee retirement contributions, and other belt-tightening - enough to save about $10 million. Not quite enough to close the hole. Now, Hanycz is interested in leading La Salle in a less frantic and more comprehensive look at every program - academic and nonacademic - to determine which should be maintained, upgraded, added, or jettisoned.
NEWS
March 25, 1986 | By Michael D. Schaffer, Inquirer Staff Writer (Staff writer Marc Duvoisin in Rome contributed to this article.)
Representatives of America's Catholic colleges and universities have warned the Vatican that a proposal to tighten church control over Catholic institutions of higher learning could devastate their schools. In a blunt critique hand-delivered to the Vatican last month, the Association of Catholic Colleges and Universities (ACCU) in Washington, D.C., declared that the plan, if enacted in its present form, could lead to the loss of half a billion dollars a year in state and federal aid for the nation's 235 Catholic colleges.
NEWS
January 26, 1995 | By Ralph Vigoda, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In his comfortable president's office on the campus of St. Joseph's University, the Rev. Nicholas S. Rashford is preparing to talk about the challenges Catholic colleges and universities are facing. But before he does, he wants to check on the latest earthquake news from Japan. So he sits for a few minutes in front of his computer. If there is an image that bespeaks today's Catholic college, this is it: Father Rashford - holder of graduate and doctoral degrees from prestigious secular universities, chairman of the Delaware River Port Authority since 1987, and amateur photographer extraordinaire - wearing the traditional collar of the Society of Jesus, deftly manipulating a mouse and cruising the Internet.
NEWS
January 17, 2012 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Before becoming president of Immaculata University, Sister R. Patricia Fadden spent 22 years of her career in Archdiocese of Philadelphia high schools. From 1968 to 1977, she taught at West Catholic High School for Girls. She still fondly remembers students pouring onto Chestnut Street for a celebratory march when the basketball team won the local championship. From 1977 to 1985, she was director of studies at Cardinal Dougherty High School. And from 1985 to 1990, she was principal of Archbishop Prendergast High School.
NEWS
April 26, 1998 | By James M. O'Neill, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In a cavernous meeting room on Villanova University's campus - a room devoid of religious icons, other than the school insignia - faculty members gathered recently to divine the Catholic nature of their school. At LaSalle University, faculty members rewriting the school's core curriculum crafted several proposals - including one that emphasizes Catholic thought. Across town, at St. Joseph's University, debate over the school's Catholic mission has sparked a lively e-mail exchange between a theology professor and the basketball coach over whether team members should wear Nike sneakers.
NEWS
November 18, 1999 | By David O'Reilly, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The National Conference of Catholic Bishops yesterday overwhelmingly adopted controversial rules by which local bishops may exercise oversight over the theology taught at Catholic colleges in their diocese. Despite skeptical concerns of the faculty and presidents of some U.S. Catholic teaching institutions, the document containing the rules, Ex Corde Ecclesiae, asserts the right of a local bishop to credential theologians who teach at Catholic colleges and universities. The guidelines, nine years in the making, are aimed at safeguarding the Catholic identity of the nation's approximately 230 Catholic colleges and universities.
NEWS
May 18, 2008 | By Susan Snyder INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Finals are over. The school year is done. And another graduating class passed through yesterday at Rosemont College, but a debate rages on: Should the small Catholic all-women's school - the last remaining in the Philadelphia region - begin to enroll men? Facing a "perilous" financial situation, Rosemont needs to open its doors to men, concluded a broad-based committee at work for 15 months at the Main Line school. The college president and chairman of the trustees are backing the finding.
NEWS
May 22, 2016
On April 23, the Catholic Philopatrian Literary Institute celebrated its 166th anniversary with the Philo Mercy Works Ball. Founded in 1850, the institute was known for educating immigrant children and starting Catholic schools in the region. The black-tie event was held on all three floors of the historic Stotesbury Mansion in Philadelphia. More than 165 guests enjoyed an evening of cocktails, dinner, dancing, cigars, and billiards, all for a good cause. The evening raised $100,000 to benefit Mercy Vocational High School, the only Catholic Vocational High School in the country, and the Philopatrian Scholarship Foundation, which provides scholarships and grants to hundreds of students attending Catholic colleges and universities in the city.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 22, 2016
On April 23, the Catholic Philopatrian Literary Institute celebrated its 166th anniversary with the Philo Mercy Works Ball. Founded in 1850, the institute was known for educating immigrant children and starting Catholic schools in the region. The black-tie event was held on all three floors of the historic Stotesbury Mansion in Philadelphia. More than 165 guests enjoyed an evening of cocktails, dinner, dancing, cigars, and billiards, all for a good cause. The evening raised $100,000 to benefit Mercy Vocational High School, the only Catholic Vocational High School in the country, and the Philopatrian Scholarship Foundation, which provides scholarships and grants to hundreds of students attending Catholic colleges and universities in the city.
NEWS
February 26, 2016 | By Susan Snyder, Staff Writer
Men and women should be able to share a townhouse on their college campus - even if that college is Catholic, says Nicholas Lario, a sophomore at La Salle University. Turns out, nearly four-fifths of those in La Salle's student body who voted in a recent student-government referendum agreed with him. The university's administration has not taken a position on the issue. Were La Salle to adopt Lario's proposal, it could be the only Catholic college in the area - perhaps the country - to allow such an arrangement, though many schools have allowed men and women to share dorm rooms and apartments for years.
NEWS
September 18, 2015 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Rosemont College on Wednesday announced it will cut tuition a whopping 43 percent next year and knock $1,900 off room and board in a bid to attract families scared away by a sticker price that this year topped $46,000. The new price tag? $30,000. But no students will see a $16,000 price cut, because the college - like many peers - doled out so much aid that few paid close to the sticker price. Still, Rosemont officials say each student can expect to pay less. Their savings, the college said, will average $815 per student.
NEWS
September 16, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
With the presidential candidates beginning to weigh in on the high price of a college education, maybe families will finally get some relief from the crushing debt resulting from seemingly endless tuition hikes. The problem has gotten worse since the early 1980s, when tuition growth began outpacing median family income, making college less attainable both for the middle class and for families trying to reach that level. As a result, students attempting to achieve the dream of a college education have amassed a record $1.2 trillion in debt.
NEWS
September 11, 2015 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Learning that the university she was about to lead faced a deficit equal to nearly 10 percent of its operating budget, Colleen M. Hanycz knew it was time for "crisis triage. " Hanycz, who became president of La Salle University in July, oversaw 23 layoffs, about the same number of buyouts of longtime employees, a major reduction in employee retirement contributions, and other belt-tightening - enough to save about $10 million. Not quite enough to close the hole. Now, Hanycz is interested in leading La Salle in a less frantic and more comprehensive look at every program - academic and nonacademic - to determine which should be maintained, upgraded, added, or jettisoned.
NEWS
October 24, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Rev. Terrence Toland, 90, a Jesuit priest who during his eight years as the 23d president of St. Joseph's College introduced major changes, died Friday, Oct. 18, of heart failure at Manresa Hall, Loyola Center, Merion. Although Father Toland was a theology teacher and educational administrator in Philadelphia and elsewhere, his major contribution came between 1968 and 1976, when he headed the college, now a university. He formalized rules for faculty tenure; created effective faculty governance; improved academic standards; built the Science Center and the six-story LaFarge Residence Hall; founded the Office of Campus Ministry and also the Institute for Jewish and Christian Relations; and in 1970 welcomed the first female students to the campus.
NEWS
September 10, 2012 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
A year after the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Philadelphia passed into his hands, Archbishop Charles J. Chaput is arguably within his rights when he avows, "It's hard to say I love it here. " Since his installation on Sept. 8, 2011, the drama has been unremitting. He has: closed nine parishes and 27 schools; laid off 18 percent of the archdiocesan administrative staff and shut down the 117-year-old newspaper to shrink a $17.5 million operating deficit; turned over management of the high schools to a private foundation; sold the cardinal's mansion and put the retired priests' Shore villa up for sale; led a fervid religious-freedom crusade against President Obama's health-care law; seen his chief financial officer convicted of embezzling nearly $1 million; weathered the child-endangerment trial and conviction of the former head of the clergy office; removed seven sexually abusive priests from ministry - and in his words, "It's still not finished.
NEWS
January 17, 2012 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Before becoming president of Immaculata University, Sister R. Patricia Fadden spent 22 years of her career in Archdiocese of Philadelphia high schools. From 1968 to 1977, she taught at West Catholic High School for Girls. She still fondly remembers students pouring onto Chestnut Street for a celebratory march when the basketball team won the local championship. From 1977 to 1985, she was director of studies at Cardinal Dougherty High School. And from 1985 to 1990, she was principal of Archbishop Prendergast High School.
BUSINESS
December 18, 2011 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Cabrini College said last month it was cutting undergraduate tuition and fees 12.5 percent for the 2012-13 academic year, officials said it was important to bring Cabrini's $33,176 price tag back under $30,000. The Radnor college was alone among the seven small Catholic schools in the Philadelphia area in charging more than $30,000. What's more, only three small Catholic institutions from Maine to Virginia cost more than Cabrini this year. The six other local colleges in Cabrini's cohort are Chestnut Hill College, Gwynedd-Mercy College, Immaculata University, Holy Family University, Neumann University, and Rosemont College.
NEWS
September 21, 2011 | By Ann Rodgers, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
St. Francis University in Loretto, Pa., has canceled a lecture on civility by the syndicated columnist Ellen Goodman after an advocacy group called attention to her strong public support for abortion rights. "After careful consideration, the university feels that the body of your work has reflected statements that are not in close enough alignment with some Catholic teachings and with the values and mission of the university as required for an event of this stature," provost Wayne Powel wrote to the Pulitzer Prize winner.
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