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Catholic Politicians

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NEWS
August 3, 1990 | BY RALPH THOMAS TAYLOR
The controversy surrounding whether Catholic politicians should actively oppose the right to abortion is not as complicated as it sounds. The clamor from pro-abortion circles distracts from the real issue, which is the moral choice the Catholic politician must make. Am I first a Catholic and then a politician, or am I first a politician and then a Catholic? Is my primary vocation to love and serve God as a follower of Jesus, or is my primary vocation to serve the constituents who elected me?
NEWS
December 3, 1989 | By Tom Krattenmaker, Associated Press Inquirer staff writer Larry King contributed to this article
Roman Catholic legislators in New Jersey say the church has every right to try to shape their moral views - but not their political positions. A recent push by U.S. bishops to get Catholic politicians to work against abortion rights apparently will not have much influence in Trenton. Several Catholic lawmakers, including Assembly Speaker-elect Joseph Doria, said last week that their church beliefs would not change their political convictions against banning abortion. "The church has control over my moral life.
NEWS
June 15, 1990 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Cardinal John O'Connor said in a statement yesterday that Catholic politicians risk excommunication if they insist on supporting abortion rights. The cardinal said excommunication may be "the only option" for Catholics who persist in advocating legislation that supports abortion or public funding of the procedure. A spokesman for the cardinal said his comments were meant not as a warning, but as a guide to Catholic politicians about the church's options. "He does not have a hit list," said spokesman Joseph Zwilling.
NEWS
May 20, 1990 | By Nancy Phillips, Inquirer Staff Writer
Despite the threat of sanctions from the church, Catholic politicians who support abortion rights are not likely to change their views, political analysts said yesterday. The bishop of Camden's Catholic Diocese on Friday ordered that Catholic public officials who oppose a ban on abortion be barred from speaking at church-sponsored events, receiving honors from the church or holding church office. Bishop James T. McHugh also called upon the 375,000 Catholics in his South Jersey diocese to support anti-abortion candidates in elections.
NEWS
April 11, 1990 | By S.A. Paolantonio, Inquirer Staff Writer
Last month, at a forum in Northeast Philadelphia, Harvey Rice, a Catholic running in the Democratic primary in the Second Senate District, was persistently asked to reconcile his belief in abortion rights and the teachings of his church. The environment in the Northeast YWCA on Holme Avenue was friendly. All the candidates supported abortion rights, and the forum sponsor, the National Organization for Women, wants to overturn Pennsylvania's abortion laws. Still, one questioner pushed Rice, the only Catholic among the four candidates.
NEWS
April 24, 2004 | By James Kuhnhenn INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Sen. John Kerry, a former Roman Catholic altar boy, reasserted his defense of women's right to abortion yesterday as a Vatican official called on priests to stop granting Communion to politicians who vote for abortion rights. The confluence of a high-profile speech on behalf of women's rights and the declaration by Cardinal Francis Arinze in Rome escalated Kerry's uneasy relationship with the church over abortion. It also raised new questions about the relationship between religious and political convictions, an issue that has also dogged President Bush.
NEWS
November 21, 1998 | By Glen Justice, Ken Dilanian and Tom Turcol, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Local Catholic politicians who support abortion rights said yesterday that they were frustrated but not intimidated by an aggressive new effort by the nation's bishops urging them to rethink their views. During their semiannual meeting in Washington, the National Conference of Catholic Bishops on Wednesday issued a pastoral statement calling on parish priests to lobby Catholic public officials, who the church says are obligated to oppose abortion, the death penalty, and physician-assisted suicide.
NEWS
September 27, 2012 | From Staff and Wire Reports
NEWARK, N.J. - The Newark archbishop is urging more than one million Roman Catholics in North Jersey - especially Catholic politicians - to defend marriage against those he says would "deconstruct or radically alter its meaning. " In a pastoral statement Tuesday, Archbishop John Myers said equating same-sex marriage to marriage as "it has traditionally been understood" damages the institutions of marriage and family. He says redefining marriage would "enshrine in law a nonoptimal way to raise children as equivalent to that which is best.
NEWS
May 9, 2004 | By Tom Turcol INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Roman Catholic politicians in New Jersey, including one who left the church yesterday, are expressing anger at what they say is an attempt by church leaders to force them to decide between their government oaths and their religion. Elected officials said that escalating demands by the church hierarchy in New Jersey that Gov. McGreevey and others vote in accordance with Catholic doctrine on public issues runs counter to the principle of the separation of church and state. State Senate Majority Leader Bernard Kenny said he told his pastor yesterday that he had decided to leave the church after 57 years.
NEWS
April 30, 2004 | By David O'Reilly INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Bishop Joseph Galante, incoming leader of the Camden Catholic diocese, said yesterday that he would deny communion to Gov. McGreevey if he sought it at Galante's installation Mass today. "If he comes to communion, I'd give him a blessing," Galante told a news conference in Camden. "In his case, he can't go to communion. " Galante said he was taking the stance primarily because the divorced governor, who is Catholic, remarried without receiving a church annulment. Also, he said, McGreevey's record of "pushing" for legalized abortion, stem-cell research, and other positions the church views as immoral "is almost like he throws the gauntlet down.
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NEWS
September 27, 2012 | From Staff and Wire Reports
NEWARK, N.J. - The Newark archbishop is urging more than one million Roman Catholics in North Jersey - especially Catholic politicians - to defend marriage against those he says would "deconstruct or radically alter its meaning. " In a pastoral statement Tuesday, Archbishop John Myers said equating same-sex marriage to marriage as "it has traditionally been understood" damages the institutions of marriage and family. He says redefining marriage would "enshrine in law a nonoptimal way to raise children as equivalent to that which is best.
NEWS
February 29, 2012 | By Scot Lehigh
By Scot Lehigh Although Rick Santorum says he's not running for pastor-in-chief, the Republican primary campaign has revealed a candidate too governed by faith to lead a diverse country. That's not because the former Pennsylvania senator is Catholic. Rather, it's because his ultraconservative religious beliefs so inform his life, his values, and his worldview that he would not be able to separate that perspective from public-policy questions, or to decide an issue on the facts rather than faith, even if he wanted to. Not that he does want to, of course.
NEWS
September 8, 2011 | BY NICHOLAS P. CAFARDI
WHEN POPE Benedict XVI transferred Archbishop Charles Chaput from Denver to Philadelphia, one of the nation's most prominent Catholic archdioceses, the appointment captured the attention of faithful Catholics, the media and undoubtedly a few nervous elected officials. The archbishop has earned a reputation as one of the church's most outspoken conservatives. During the 2004 presidential race, he warned Catholics they would be "cooperating in evil" if they voted for Democrat John Kerry, a devout Catholic who does not favor criminalizing abortion but whose positions on support for pregnant women, immigration reform, nuclear disarmament and other issues align with Catholic teaching.
NEWS
July 31, 2011
George Weigel is distinguished senior fellow of Washington's Ethics and Public Policy Center When Pope Benedict XVI appointed Charles J. Chaput as the new archbishop of Philadelphia on July 19, the usual suspects were trotted out to say the usual things that the usual suspects say. Thus, David Clohessy of SNAP, the Survivors Network of Those Abused by Priests, continued his nine-year rant against the Catholic Church by pronouncing Chaput's...
NEWS
November 8, 2007 | By Lisa Sowle Cahill
Abortion has again become a prickly issue for another Roman Catholic seeking to be our next president. Archbishop Raymond Burke of St. Louis sparked a contentious debate over the role of faith, politics and conscience three years ago when he publicly stated that Sen. John Kerry, a pro-choice Catholic, was unfit to receive Communion. Now, the archbishop has entered the 2008 campaign fray by asserting that he would deny Communion to the leading Republican nominee, Rudy Giuliani, the former New York City mayor, who says he personally opposes abortion, but recognizes a woman's "constitutional right" to choose.
NEWS
April 20, 2005
Benedict means blessed. It's both an assertion - that "the man with this name has been blessed" - and a cry of hope - that the blessings will continue. May both meanings fit the election yesterday of Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger to succeed John Paul II as pope. Cardinal Ratzinger chose Benedict XVI as his papal name. May his papacy indeed be a blessing - and may the blessings continue. Ratzinger is an insider's insider, a networker, and a strong-willed politician, so it's unlikely great changes are in the offing in the Roman Catholic Church.
NEWS
August 25, 2004 | By Jim Remsen INQUIRER FAITH LIFE EDITOR
In an election season suffused with religious references, a nationwide poll released yesterday found that while most respondents say "moral values" are important to their vote, an increasing number have grown tired of politicians' talk of faith and prayer. The Pew Research Center for the People and the Press said its finding "marks a clear shift" in sentiment from a year ago. Whereas 41 percent of respondents in 2003 said politicians discussed their faith too little, only 31 percent felt that way in the latest survey - and the number who said there was too much rose from 21 percent to 27 percent.
NEWS
May 30, 2004 | By David O'Reilly INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Pssst. Did you catch Shrek 2 last week? Did you see Troy? Did you set foot in a movie theater? For Catholics of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia, such pleasures were once guilty, even immoral. Going to any movie was declared a sin. Seventy years ago next week, on June 7, 1934, Cardinal Dennis Dougherty commanded all Catholics of his archdiocese to stop going to the movies - a ban that has never been formally lifted. Greta Garbo, Shirley Temple, Donald Duck - it made no difference who was cavorting up on the silver screen.
NEWS
May 9, 2004 | By Tom Turcol INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Roman Catholic politicians in New Jersey, including one who left the church yesterday, are expressing anger at what they say is an attempt by church leaders to force them to decide between their government oaths and their religion. Elected officials said that escalating demands by the church hierarchy in New Jersey that Gov. McGreevey and others vote in accordance with Catholic doctrine on public issues runs counter to the principle of the separation of church and state. State Senate Majority Leader Bernard Kenny said he told his pastor yesterday that he had decided to leave the church after 57 years.
NEWS
May 9, 2004 | By David O'Reilly INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Why abortion? Why now? With bishops vowing to deny Communion to Democratic presidential candidate John Kerry and New Jersey Gov. Jim McGreevey, abortion has reemerged as a litmus test for Catholic politicians. In the face of complaints that they are unfairly targeting Democrats, church leaders last week said they were right to spotlight abortion because the issue has always been foremost on their public agenda. Camden Bishop Joseph A. Galante, who said last month that he would not give McGreevey Communion, recently described abortion as an "absolute wrong" that gives it paramount status among Catholic life issues.
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