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NEWS
February 26, 2008
RE TED Farrell's Feb. 14 letter: The number of high schools nationally that graduate less than 50 percent of their students has increased by 70 percent. We have more than our share in Philadelphia, and they contribute disproportionately to rising crime in our city. Catholic schools are a part of the solution. With more than 85,000 students in the Delaware Valley, impressive graduation rates and academic results, Catholic schools provide an alternative to our public schools.
NEWS
August 26, 2009
CHILDREN with access to Catholic schools have an opportunity to receive an education that develops confidence to succeed in school, on the job and in life. Dan Geringer's Aug. 19 article discussed the possibility of consolidating some of the Catholic high schools in the city, which has proven a successful alternative to leaving a community without a parochial school. Merging schools helps sustain quality education and supports a system that produces qualified high-school graduates, the vast majority of whom go on to higher education.
NEWS
January 2, 2009
I'D like to thank Dan Geringer and the Daily News for the moving piece about 7-year-old David Atkins and St. Martin de Porres Interparochial School. In light of the tragic murder of David's father, the school has gone above and beyond in helping his family rebuild their lives. The support provided by the school and its member parishes illustrates the critical role that Catholic schools play in our neighborhoods. While the primary focus is on education, we can't discount the importance of the lessons in human compassion that are ever-present in these schools.
NEWS
September 3, 1990 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
This could be the year that parish schools in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia end an era of declining enrollment caused by a drop in the birthrates, population shifts and rising tuition. When schools open Wednesday throughout the five-county archdiocese, officials expect about the same number of students to enter the 235 parish elementary schools as left in June. This modest improvement after years of decline is cause for hope. Total enrollment in local Catholic schools dropped from 138,595 in 1985 to 125,135 in the school year that ended in June - a 9.7 percent decline.
NEWS
May 1, 1995 | By Yvette Ousley, Daily News Staff Writer
Some 25,000 Philadelphia children could arrive at private and parochial schools with vouchers in hand by September 1996 under Gov. Ridge's school- choice plan. Will the Archdiocese of Philadelphia be ready? For the last 25 years, Catholic schools have been on a steady decline - the result of increased costs and declining enrollments. Schools have closed. Buildings have been sold. Teachers have remained among the lowest paid. An influx of new students would mean having to find space, hire more teachers - and pay for both.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 22, 2015 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
Debra Brillante, who has nearly 25 years of experience as a Catholic educator, has been named superintendent of elementary schools for the Archdiocese of Philadelphia. Her appointment, announced Wednesday by the Office of Catholic Education, takes effect immediately. Brillante, 60, had held the post on an interim basis since November when Jacqueline P. Coccia left to become the academic dean at the Academy of Notre Dame de Namur, a private Catholic girls' school in Villanova.
NEWS
April 20, 2015 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Luz Carabello, her husband, and their two children left Camden last May and moved into their new home in West Deptford. But Carabello, a Camden native who lived in the city for most of her life, never considered taking her son and daughter out of Camden's St. Joseph Pro-Cathedral School. Carabello, 30, was the first member of her family to graduate from high school and college. Now an emergency-room nurse at Inspira Medical Center in Woodbury, she said she owed her success to Camden's Catholic schools.
BUSINESS
February 17, 2015 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
In 2012, Philadelphia Archbishop Charles J. Chaput rescinded the threatened closing of four Catholic high schools after a group of developers, executives, and foundations promised to raise money and take a more active role supporting them. On behalf of those schools, a private group that helps families pay tuition has more than tripled its yearly scholarship grants through Pennsylvania's Educational Improvement Tax Credit Program and related credits. The credits allow companies to redirect part of their state taxes to private, independent, and parochial schools so they can provide tuition assistance to any student who applies, until the money runs out. Business Leaders Organized for Catholic Schools started as an archdiocese-controlled, lay- and ecumenically led, corporate-backed effort in 1980.
NEWS
December 25, 2014 | By Melanie Burney, Inquirer Staff Writer
They have danced in ugly sweaters, washed cars, and pleaded and lobbied to save St. Paul School in Burlington City. In only a few weeks, the grassroots appeal has raised nearly $125,000, half of what the 144-year-old parish school must raise or else be forced to close for the 2015-16 school year. With a few weeks remaining in the campaign, advocates are optimistic that they will raise $250,000 by Jan. 15 and keep the Burlington County school open. Students enjoyed breakfast with Santa at the school Tuesday before early dismissal for their holiday break.
NEWS
November 2, 2014 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
More than 3,500 Catholic educators from across the Archdiocese of Philadelphia gathered at the Convention Center on Friday morning for what was called the region's first Archbishop's Day for Teachers and Administrators. Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, who said he held such sessions every year he was bishop in Denver and Rapid City, S.D., used the occasion to thank educators and release a pastoral letter outlining his commitment to Catholic schools and stating that religion remains at their core.
NEWS
October 11, 2014 | By Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia police are investigating the spray-painting of a racial slur on a Catholic high school in Spring Garden. Police were alerted to the offensive graffiti when someone sent a photo to CBS3 News over Twitter around 1:45 a.m. Thursday, showing the slur painted at an entrance to John W. Hallahan Catholic Girls' School. Police said the graffiti had been painted overnight. A maintenance worker at the school told police the entrance had not been vandalized when he left around 9:30 p.m. Wednesday.
NEWS
September 21, 2014 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
A new Philadelphia education group is on the scene. On the airwaves, in print ads, and online, an organization called PhillySchoolChoice.com says it aims to build a coalition of parents to spread the word that charter schools, Catholic schools, and district magnet schools are options for city students. The group is affiliated with Choice Media Inc., an educational-advocacy nonprofit in Hoboken, N.J. On Monday, it began airing 30-second spots on television featuring unnamed city parents talking about how their children have benefited from charter and parochial schools.
NEWS
August 16, 2014
ISSUE | EDUCATION No time to give up on city schools If Clark DeLeon is giving up on public schools, who's left ("Amid annual budget crises, faith in public education fades," Aug. 10)? DeLeon was educated in city schools, from kindergarten through Temple University, and has earned a living writing and teaching about Philadelphia. For him to give up bodes ill for all of us, so I have two words for DeLeon: The first is quitter . This town hates quitters. Instead of caving, he should use the bully pulpit of his column to fight for our schools.
NEWS
August 14, 2014
RONNIE Polaneczky's recent column on our ongoing fight to help Philadelphia does little to help those of us fighting to give Philadelphia schools the tools needed to open on time. Instead of enlightening readers on the difficulties we face in educating Philadelphia's 200,000 students, Polaneczky chose to attack the wife of House Majority Leader Mike Turzai as part of an overall assault on the Pennsylvania House of Representatives as we worked to pass enabling legislation for Philadelphia City Council to levy a $2-per-pack cigarette tax to help fund our city's schools.
NEWS
July 12, 2014 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
The nonprofit foundation that manages Catholic high schools in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia is offering $1,000 grants to encourage students to transfer to the schools. Christopher Mominey, chief operating officer of the Faith in the Future Foundation and the archdiocese's secretary for Catholic education, said the new "transfer advantage" grants were part of the effort to boost enrollment at the 17 high schools. He said the foundation wanted to attract students who were not enrolled at Catholic high schools but were interested in learning more about them.
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