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Cautionary Tale

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ENTERTAINMENT
July 17, 1998 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Imagine Ally McBeal featuring two buff Boston attorneys, GWMs looking for soulmates with brains, bods and bank accounts equal to theirs, and you have All the Rage, a comic cautionary tale about how the heart and the eyes have different appetites. Christopher (John-Michael Lander) is an estate lawyer with the chiseled face of a Details magazine coverboy and the sculpted abs usually found on heroic statues and Chippendales dancers. His best friend at the firm, Larry (Jay Corcoran)
ENTERTAINMENT
May 19, 1989 | By Douglas J. Keating, Inquirer Staff Writer
Caryl Churchill's Top Girls is at once a strongly feminist play and a cautionary tale for feminists. The play shows how strong, determined women in the past were able to fulfill themselves even though they were greatly constrained by male oppression and how boorish and empty the same type of woman can be today with the freedom, more or less, to be herself. Churchill presents the women from the past in a lengthy, highly imaginative opening scene that has Marlene, a contemporary character who is newly named to head her office, celebrating the promotion at a dinner with noted women from the past.
NEWS
May 30, 2004 | By Jack Severson INQUIRER TRAVEL EDITOR
Though not strictly a travel book, How Not to Live Abroad (Citadel Press, $19.95) is a cautionary tale for anyone who has ever traveled abroad in search of himself/herself - at no matter what stage of life. What starts out as an escapist vacation to Spain for a pair of twentyish slackers - desperate to avoid work in the real world and the type of humdrum lives they see folks living around them in London - becomes a comedically disastrous story befitting the book's title. How many of us - and I am not discounting our post-adolescent traipses across the Continent or Southeast Asia or Latin America, in between baccalaureate and grad school or beyond - have found ourselves so enamored of the culture, climate or environment of some thoroughly foreign venue that we didn't seriously consider carving out a new life right there?
NEWS
February 14, 2012
The story is familiar. Beautiful, talented singer, actor, dancer, and on down the list, succumbs in a tragic likely accident that may have involved drug abuse. Whitney Houston was added to that roll call Saturday. She was 48. Like so many others, she is gone too soon, and yet she will always be with us. Almost from the time the little girl from Newark opened her mouth in song, it was clear she would one day be a star. And why not, given her lineage? Gospel great Cissy Houston was her mother, pop music icon Dionne Warwick her aunt, and the queen of soul, Aretha Franklin, her godmother.
SPORTS
July 17, 2011 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Staff Writer
CLEVELAND - The Indians sat in first place when, on the cool and pleasant evening of June 20, they opened a series with the Colorado Rockies at Progressive Field. Despite the good record and weather, and even though interleague play typically produces a crowd bump, Northern Ohio's tortured sports fans were unmoved. The Indians, then last in baseball attendance, drew just 15,224 spectators to the 8-7 loss. Perhaps Clevelanders suspected the success was a first-half illusion.
NEWS
February 7, 2005 | By Mark McDonald INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
When rescuers began pulling victims from the rubble of the sugar factory here in 1988, the corpses seemed like ghastly, crimson ghosts, covered with an awful goo, a coagulating mixture of blood and powdered sugar. The 6.9-magnitude earthquake that crushed the sugar plant also destroyed every other factory in this mountainous patch of northern Armenia. It flattened schools, churches, homes and hospitals, killing more than 25,000 people and leaving half a million homeless. The 1988 disaster was nowhere near the scale of the Dec. 26 tsunami, but the horror and grief were the same.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 2010 | By Wendy Rosenfield FOR THE INQUIRER
"Take a glance at Noah. . . . He didn't pair up the apes with the antelope, right? It's one of the many laws of nature. 'Run with your own kind.' " This is the generous eugenic advice proffered by slender Carter (Paul Felder) to slender Tom (Ed Renninger) about the impropriety of Tom's plus-size girlfriend in Fat Pig, Theatre Horizon's current production. Playwright Neil LaBute's "kind," of course, are those possessed of a deep well of self-loathing from which to draw endless vitriol or tortured inertia, or both.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 8, 2005 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
A feverish tale of convent schoolgirls who confuse spiritual with sexual ecstasy (or is it the reverse?), Lucretia Martel's The Holy Girl is as eerie and intoxicating as the theremin music it prominently features. Set in an Argentina hotel during a convention of ear, nose and throat doctors, Martel's haunting film focuses on Amalia (Maria Alche), a 16-year-old who has a twin awakening, erotic and religious, when a man rubs up against her in the street. Martel, who previously made the likewise elliptical La Ci?naga, shoots her characters in extreme close-ups, focusing on the sensory portals of ears, noses and throats.
SPORTS
March 14, 2013 | By Michael Harrington, Inquirer Staff Writer
A cautionary tale: One century, you're the "Eighth Wonder of the World" - the next, you're just another derelict. The Astrodome, the awe-inspiring home and namesake of the National League Houston Astros when it opened in 1965, has been unfit for occupancy since 2009, still has about $30 million in construction debt, and sits deteriorating next to Reliant Stadium, home of the NFL Houston Texans. The 'Stros? They are now in the American League and have played in a retractable-roof arena since 2000.
NEWS
July 22, 2010
The Ellen DeGeneres Show (3 p.m., NBC10) - Actress Sandra Bullock ( The Blind Side ). The Oprah Winfrey Show (4 p.m., 6ABC) - Jenny Sanford discusses her ex-husband's international, headline-making affair. Community (8 p.m., NBC10) - The gang finds out that Jeff has a new love interest, which he wanted to keep under wraps. But now that everyone knows, he can at least keep her identity to himself. Rookie Blue (9 p.m., 6ABC) - Many of the officers' personal secrets come spilling out as Andy and Traci are among the first responders to a home invasion.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
January 26, 2016 | By Erin Arvedlund, Staff Writer
Roughly 15 years ago, I wrote an article about a notable Wall Street figure and his secretive investment fund that never, ever lost money. His name was Bernard Madoff. The dot.com bubble had just burst, yet Madoff's hedge fund earned 10 percent that year, without missing a beat. In May 2001, I wrote about some red flags surrounding Madoff's hedge fund: eerily consistent returns and no losing years even when the stock market crashed, no due diligence allowed by investors, no independent brokerage statements, and odd threats that investors could not return to the fund once they had cashed out. Madoff himself gave me a brief interview by phone, then metaphorically patted me on the head and told me to go away.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 4, 2015 | By Molly Eichel, Inquirer Staff Writer
Eden is less a cautionary tale about a life fueled by music, clubs, and drugs, than about how life can pass you by when you aren't looking. French director Mia Hansen-Løve co-wrote the film with her brother, Sven, on whom the main character, Paul (Félix de Givry), is based. Eden follows Paul through two decades of his career as a DJ, starting out as an excited kid obsessed with garage, a form of dance music that originated in New York's gay-friendly Paradise Garage in the 1980s and is characterized by strong female vocals.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 2015 | By Toby Zinman, For The Inquirer
Simpatico Theatre Project presents Obie Award-winning Milk Like Sugar by Kirsten Greenidge, an engrossing drama that is both a cautionary tale and a societal indictment, with a superb cast. Greenidge can write what sounded to me to be pitch-perfect dialogue, and Alan Radway directs the ensemble with respect and a clever use of the Adrienne Theatre's Skybox space. Three teenage African American girls, living in a ghettoized community in any American city, are sworn friends: Annie (Nastassja Baset)
SPORTS
November 16, 2014 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Columnist
The sports-celebrity machine has adapted to the ever-quickening pace of change. In 2014, heroes rise and fall with rapidity, like those desert flowers that emerge in the morning cool and by nightfall are dust. In a Dish TV commercial, endlessly repeated this football season, Brian Bosworth and Heath Shuler trade on their falls from fame. Terrell Owens clone Chad Ochocinco now plays football in Canada, a status synonymous with invisibility. T.O. himself was sued for divorce earlier this year, two weeks after his first marriage.
NEWS
July 10, 2014 | By Jason Grant, Inquirer Staff Writer
Two Philadelphia officials say deteriorated rubble stone and mortar, set in place in the early 1900s, caused the sudden collapse of two Cobbs Creek rowhouses Monday. As a demolition crew worked Tuesday to tear down the pancaked homes, the commissioner and emergency services director of the Department of Licenses and Inspections said "the content and structure" of a foundation, made of rubble stone and mortar, under the party wall connecting 6015 and 6017 Spruce St. had broken down over decades.
SPORTS
February 6, 2014 | By Mike Sielski, Inquirer Columnist
The first Seahawks fan hadn't yet boarded NJ Transit for Secaucus on Sunday when Don Smolenski reminded everyone just how much Jeffrey Lurie and the Eagles want to host a Super Bowl. The Eagles president, Smolenski was on the phone a few days before Super Bowl XLVIII, making it clear that he and Lurie were keeping a close eye on how New York and New Jersey handled the run-up to the big game. That way, they'd be better prepared to make their bid for a Super Bowl in Philadelphia and at Lincoln Financial Field.
NEWS
August 2, 2013
A FEW WEEKS AGO, Rolling Stone had the execrable taste to put the accused Boston Marathon bomber on the cover, making him look just like a Semitic version of Justin Bieber. Since I have very little respect for a magazine that essentially ambushed Gen. Stanley McChrystal, proselytizes for stoners and portrays Sarah Palin as a slut, I wasn't really surprised. Disgusted maybe, but not surprised. Still, how annoyed can you get at a publication that has pretensions of grandeur, but is, at its black little heart, Teen Beat on steroids?
BUSINESS
July 15, 2013 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Columnist
Without access to a forensic engineer and, let's face it, a time machine, it's impossible to tease out every detail in the frustrating fight pitting Barbara Torode and James Smart against the Philadelphia Gas Works. It began last summer, when the utility refused to pay for nearly $1,000 in repairs under their PGW Parts and Labor Plan. It still rankles today. But this much is clear: Their dispute could serve as Exhibit No. 1 in the case against service contracts, those insurance-like deals that are supposed to buy peace of mind but instead often yield a great big headache.
BUSINESS
May 22, 2013 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Inquirer Columnist
If you have the guts to blow the whistle on a Wall Street investment fraud and approach U.S. regulators with your allegations, beware the case of Kathleen Furey. Imagine being a whistle-blower, but with the added weight of actually working at the primary Wall Street watchdog. Not only did Furey, a senior counsel for the SEC for nearly nine years now, work for the U.S. market regulator, but she was punished for bringing attention to the fact that fraud cases against money managers were going nowhere at the agency.
SPORTS
March 14, 2013 | By Michael Harrington, Inquirer Staff Writer
A cautionary tale: One century, you're the "Eighth Wonder of the World" - the next, you're just another derelict. The Astrodome, the awe-inspiring home and namesake of the National League Houston Astros when it opened in 1965, has been unfit for occupancy since 2009, still has about $30 million in construction debt, and sits deteriorating next to Reliant Stadium, home of the NFL Houston Texans. The 'Stros? They are now in the American League and have played in a retractable-roof arena since 2000.
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