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LIVING
October 10, 1999 | By Gene D'Alessandro, FOR THE INQUIRER
There's no sign, and no line. Just a small black awning that indicates the entrance of Fluid, atop the Latest Dish restaurant on Fourth Street near South Street. On Thursday nights from 10 o'clock on, it's the "Platinum" party attended by young heads - a crowd of slackers and ravers in their early 20s, wearing baggy khakis and cargo pants, T-shirts and tank tops, and baseball caps and hooded sweatshirts. Plus urban grungers and the fashion plates (including women in go-go dresses, outlandish fur coats and feather boas)
NEWS
December 20, 1987 | By Jonathan Storm, Inquirer Staff Writer
Most good museums have a nice selection of old masters, but there's only one place in the world to see the finest work of the oldest masters, prehistoric painters who worked about 14,000 B.C. The place is a cave region: In the French Pyrenees, it's Lascaux I, and in northern Spain, it's Altamira. Because the works on their walls are so precious, they have been closed to the public, but International Art and Anthropological Tours has been given access to both of them. Its trip begins May 19, in Santander, Spain, and ends two weeks later in Bordeaux, France.
NEWS
May 6, 1988 | From Inquirer Wire Services
French commandos backed by helicopter gunships yesterday stormed an oceanside cave where Melanesian separatists held 23 French hostages, freeing the captives in a nearly eight-hour battle that left 17 dead. The hostages, 22 French gendarmes and a state prosecutor, all managed to escape unharmed during the fighting at the coral grotto on the island of Ouvea, part of the French Pacific territory of New Caledonia. Two police agents and 15 kidnappers were killed, and three other gendarmes were wounded in the operation.
NEWS
April 1, 1994 | By Terri Sanginiti, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Dave Josh Weisman, 21, of East Windsor, was fatally injured yesterday afternoon when the wall of a dirt trench collapsed and partly buried him, police said. Weisman, an employee of the Garden State Land Group, an landscaping company, was working at the new Lake Pointe development in Burlington Township when the cave-in occurred at 1:07 p.m. "They were having a problem with the sewer pipe, and they were clearing the pipe with a snake when it got hung up," said Burlington Township patrolman Michael G. Millhollin.
NEWS
January 22, 2006 | By Roy Zeper FOR THE INQUIRER
My wife, Shirley, and I had always been fascinated watching television shows of archaeological explorations of ancient civilizations and their mysterious cities. We were planning a two-week vacation, and our travel agent recommended the Hacienda Uxmal in the Yucatan Peninsula, situated within the hub of the ancient Mayan civilization. Our plane ride to the capital city of Merida was uneventful. We rented a car and drove the 50 miles south to our hotel. The next day, we hired a local guide.
NEWS
September 22, 2002 | By Kristin E. Holmes INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
During the 12 years that Buddhist nun Tenzin Palmo spent alone seeking enlightenment in a Himalayan cave, the British-born aesthete says she wasn't bored and was never lonely. She came close to perishing during a weeklong blizzard. But she says she was ready and happy to die. Her mother did indeed pass away while Palmo sought perfection in the stony retreat, and the nun says she has few regrets that she wasn't there. "My mother told people that they were not to let me know she was ill, because if she died what use would it be for me to be there and if she recovered what use for me to be there," Palmo said.
NEWS
July 16, 1987 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
A contractor today will begin rebuilding a Camden street that collapsed during Tuesday's heavy rains, leaving a 10-foot-deep hole wide enough to swallow an automobile. Frederick H. Martin Jr., Camden's director of utilities, said Ivymont Construction Inc. of Audubon, which the city keeps on retainer for emergency repairs, would complete the work at Sixth and Washington Streets by Tuesday. Martin said a 19th-century brick sewer caved in during the heavy rains, causing a four-inch water main to rupture.
SPORTS
March 24, 2004 | By Chris Silva FOR THE INQUIRER
When Juan Cave first went out for the St. Joseph's Prep track and field team during the spring of 2002, he strongly felt that every Friday should be a day of relaxation. That meant no high jumping, no speed drills. And yoga? What did yoga have to do with track and field, Cave wondered. At first, Cave never saw a correlation between yoga and the high jump. And really, how could you blame him? But twisting his body in awkward positions while learning various breathing techniques is exactly what Cave, a junior and one of the Catholic League's most gifted high jumpers, has done every Friday afternoon since his freshman year.
NEWS
February 28, 1990 | By Ralph Cipriano, Inquirer Staff Writer
William A. Cave, 85, a soft-spoken animal rights advocate who was president of the American Anti-Vivisection Society in Jenkintown for the last 12 years, died Friday at his home in Gladwyne. Mr. Cave, a silver-haired former salesman, wasn't the type of animal rights activist who broke into laboratories. "His focus was on education," said Bill Kelley, another society member. "He wanted to educate people as to what was going on. He wasn't a man to go around raiding laboratories and spray-painting walls.
NEWS
June 26, 1995 | by Ron Avery, Daily News Staff Writer
It's the Cave of Kelpius, and it's probably the most obscure, hard-to- locate historic site in Philadelphia. Johannes Kelpius is probably the most obscure, elusive figure in local history. So, of course, his cave is hard to find. The man was seeking an isolated place in the wilderness to meditate. Three hundred years ago, Kelpius and his crew were waiting in the hills above Wissahickon Creek for the Second Coming, the end of world. So, it's timely to consider Kelpius and "the Hermits of the Wissahickon" now because every time a new century approaches, a group appears in Philadelphia predicting the apocalypse.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 29, 2014 | By Sam Adams, For The Inquirer
As he moved across a thrust stage that cut a semicircle through the first several rows of the crowd at the Mann Center on Friday night, Nick Cave looked from the middle distance like an astronaut venturing into deepest space, his only tether the microphone cord that fans passed from hand to hand like a sacred object. Over a two-hour set with his longtime band, the Bad Seeds, he only went farther out. In recent years, Cave has adopted sobriety, and he now puts in eight-hour days at his writing desk when he's not raising twin teenage boys.
NEWS
July 9, 2014 | By Lydia O'Neal, Casey Fabris, and Jason Grant, Inquirer Staff Writers
The sudden collapse of two Cobbs Creek rowhouses Monday damaged adjacent homes and jangled nerves, but caused no injuries. "It shook my unit," said Nichet Jones, who lives next to one of the houses and was home when they fell. "There was lots of glass shattering, bricks crumbling. It was very loud. " Jones said she was in bed and her three young daughters were in their rooms. "The Red Cross is helping me," she said, waiting for clearance from the Department of Licenses and Inspections to return home.
NEWS
March 13, 2014
T UNG TO, 45, of Berwyn, owns ToBox, a shoe salon designed as a living room filled with midcentury modern antiques and a fully stocked bar cart. ToBox, which opened last November on 19th Street near Chestnut, features a mix of fine men's leather dress shoes and boots as well as shoe accessories, leather bags and belts. To is a former regional shoe buyer for Nordstrom and also ran the men's shoe department at Boyds. Q: How did you come up with the idea for ToBox? A: I wanted to open a store where people felt like when they walked in they were coming into a friend's house.
NEWS
January 13, 2014 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA A 48-inch water main broke Saturday morning, flooding the parking lot of a newly developed North Philadelphia shopping plaza and causing an 80-by-60-foot cave-in, officials said. Multiple stores in Bakers Centre, which cost $58 million to build on the 3400 block of Fox Street in an industrial area and onetime food desert, were closed Saturday after 13 million gallons of water gushed through. The main broke about 4:30 a.m., and Philadelphia Water Department workers arrived to shut the pipe down by 6:20, spokesman John DiGiulio said.
NEWS
January 13, 2014 | BY DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer geringd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5961
RUTH MORLEY, 79, has been the go-to Gal Friday and every other day at the Klein Jewish Community Center in Bustleton since 1975. So her retirement last week filled her 10th boss, president/CEO Andre Krug, with sadness - even though, as a parting gift, Morley gave him the childhood accordion she played "Lady of Spain" on at Tony Grant's "Stars of Tomorrow" on the Steel Pier in Atlantic City. "Now, I'm going to be crying," Krug told the Daily News . "I'm going to try to find somebody who has her creative juices, but I'm not sure I can. " Those creative juices, Krug said, included Morley's profitably renting the Klein JCC's theater to a wide range of acts, one of which made the late 1990s unforgettable.
NEWS
April 26, 2013 | BY MICHAEL O'SULLIVAN, Washington Post
THE DOCUMENTARY "No Place on Earth" doesn't seem as if it should work quite as well as it does. A History Channel production, the tale of Ukrainian Jews who survived in underground caves for 511 days while hiding from the Nazis during World War II is structured around lengthy, foreign-language re-enactments of the events featuring costumed performers. Why not just commit to the undeniably thrilling theatricality of the story and make a fictionalized dramatic feature? Instead, Emmy-winning documentarian Janet Tobias ("Life 360")
NEWS
April 7, 2013 | By Rafiq Maqbool and Chonchui Ngashangva, Associated Press
MUMBAI, India - A residential building being constructed illegally on forest land in a suburb of India's financial capital collapsed into a mound of steel and concrete, killing at least 47 people and injuring 70 others, authorities said Friday. The eight-story building in the Mumbai suburb of Thane caved in Thursday, police said. Rescue workers with sledgehammers, gasoline-powered saws, and hydraulic jacks struggled Friday to break through the tower of rubble in their search for possible survivors.
NEWS
March 22, 2013 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
Nick Cave crouched his 6-foot-2 frame at the edge of the stage of the Keswick Theatre in Glenside on Tuesday night. "I ain't down here for your money," the rail-thin 55-year-old Australian rocker bellowed as his band, the Bad Seeds, roared behind him. "I ain't down here for your love," he emphasized, getting his tailored suit sweaty as he dug deep into his 1988 song "Deanna. " So what was he after? He reached his arm down to smack the floor to make himself clear: "I'm down here for your soul !"
ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 2013
Inquirer staff writer Virginia A. Smith is writing this week from the Philadelphia Flower Show. These posts appeared on her blog, "Kiss the Earth," at philly.com/kisstheearth. Read her stories at philly.com/ginny, and other Flower Show coverage at philly.com/flowershow. Man Cave as BBQ pit I may be the only person in Philadelphia who doesn't like the smell of meat grilling on the BBQ. When I walked into the show's new Man Cave - The Back Yard, my first thought was e wwww . But don't let me stop you. Check out the fake grass.
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