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Cave

TRAVEL
September 30, 2012 | By Larissa and Michael Milne, For The Inquirer
PETRA, Jordan - We knew the night would be a little different than expected when at check-in Mahmoud cheerfully informed us, "I've upgraded you to a cave. " That was our introduction to staying at a Bedouin camp in Jordan. We had visions of dusty tents with Persian rugs underfoot and the odd camel lumbering by. This was true enough, but we were directed to our cave, a hole in the wall (literally) that barely had room for a floor mat, with enough striped pillows to fill a Martha Stewart home furnishings catalog.
SPORTS
August 22, 2012 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
NEW YORK - The genius of Major League Baseball's Fan Cave came clear Wednesday afternoon as "King Felix" Hernandez of the Seattle Mariners was pitching a perfect game. The four surviving Fan Cave dwellers - required to watch every inning of every game - were not just watching, but they were filming themselves watching, and tweeting as they watched. Gordon Mack, the Phillies fan in the Fan Cave, scrambled to create an image on his laptop of the pitcher and 20 7 Up cans - 27 up, 27 down, get it?
ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 2012 | By Adam Tschorn, Los Angeles Times
The 2-month-old website Dudepins.com (slogan: "Man up. Sign up. Pin up. ") is what you might end up with if you grabbed Pinterest by its grosgrain and calico corners, shook it free of all the wedding cakes, cute kittens and arty crafts, and then restocked it with photos of mustaches, man caves and Maker's Mark. The brainchild of two 25-year-olds from Vancouver, British Columbia, Kamil Szybalski and Colin Brown, Dudepins manages to be both a spot-on sendup of the oh-so-popular P-site and a humorous way for disenfranchised bros to indulge in a virtual version of time-honored traditions like showing off that LeRoy Neiman painting of Larry Bird or a maroon 1984 Cadillac Seville without being forced to wade through terabytes of braiding-twisting techniques.
NEWS
July 22, 2012 | By Bruce Schreiner and ASSOCIATED PRESS
MAMMOTH CAVE NATIONAL PARK, Ky. — Blasts of cool air offered a welcome reprieve from the scorching summer as a tour group descended into the depths of the world's longest-known cave. Some visitors donned light jackets for the long hike past panoramic scenes of subterranean wonders. Heading underground at Mammoth Cave National Park is a sure way to escape the dog days of summer. The celebrated cave that has lured the curious for thousands of years remains a temperate 54 degrees year-round.
NEWS
June 15, 2012 | By Seth Borenstein, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - New tests show that crude Spanish cave paintings of a red sphere and handprints are the oldest in the world, so ancient they may not have been by modern man. Some scientists say they might have even been made by the much-maligned Neanderthals, but others disagree. Testing the coating of paintings in 11 Spanish caves, researchers found that one is at least 40,800 years old, which is at least 15,000 years older than previously thought. That makes them older than the more famous French cave paintings by thousands of years.
NEWS
June 12, 2012 | By Dan Geringer, Daily News Staff Writer
Chillin' Wit' is a regular feature of the Daily News spotlighting a name in the news away from the job. CITY Councilman David Oh spends his Sunday at the church his father founded several decades and locations ago, Philadelphia Korean Presbyterian Church, now on Hoffman Avenue near Cobbs Creek Parkway. "It's not like I really want to shoot pool and watch sports all day," says Oh, 52. "I don't have a man cave. I'm used to working hard six days a week and then coming to church with my family every Sunday.
NEWS
June 3, 2012 | By Rahim Faiez and Deb Riechmann, Associated Press
KABUL, Afghanistan - It was a risky but successful operation: British and other NATO forces stormed a cave tucked in the mountains before dawn Saturday and rescued two foreign female aid workers and their two Afghan colleagues being held hostage by Taliban-linked militants. Helicopters, flying under the cover of darkness, ferried the rescue team to extreme northeastern Afghanistan where they suspected the hostages were being held. After confirming the workers were there, they raided the site, killed several militants, and freed the hostages, ending their nearly two-week ordeal.
NEWS
May 6, 2012 | By Deborah Abrams Kaplan, FOR THE INQUIRER
Traveling to foreign countries is much tougher with kids in tow. But it's possible to get that exotic travel experience without taking the typical beach or all-inclusive resort trip. In Puerto Rico, it feels like you've left the States: Spanish is the primary language, gas is sold in liters, and architecture resembles Mexico much more than Maryland. The island, though, has been a U.S. territory since 1898, and along with highway postings in Spanish, you'll see familiar road construction signs for the American Reinvestment and Recovery Act, and all the chain stores you get at home.
NEWS
March 19, 2012 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
  When the Franklin Institute opens its "Dead Sea Scrolls" exhibit May 12, visitors will catch a glimpse of one of the greatest archaeological discoveries of all time. Centerpiece of the exhibit will be 20 scroll fragments found in the 1940s in Palestine near the Dead Sea. They are part of an extraordinary trove of nearly 1,000 parchments that include the oldest surviving texts of the Jewish Bible, several of which will be on display in Philadelphia. Penned between 150 B.C. and A.D. 70 and sealed in urns, the scrolls make no mention of Jesus of Nazareth.
SPORTS
February 28, 2012
Major League Baseball last year came up with a concept: Let's build a "fan cave" in New York, an underground studio with a bank of big-screen televisions, and find a fan to watch every inning of every game in a season. That's 2,430 regular-season games, plus playoffs. Ten thousand fans applied. Two were chosen. There was a day game virtually every day, from April to October, and night games started at 7 in the East and didn't end in the West until 1 or 2 a.m. And in the mornings, when no games were actually being played, ballplayers and celebrities dropped by. The men in the fan cave blogged, tweeted, and drove social-media traffic.
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