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Cayenne Pepper

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FOOD
April 26, 1989 | By Gerald Etter, Inquirer Food Writer
Cooks often run across recipes that call for such ingredients as Italian seasoning or Cajun spice. These are nothing more than pre-packaged spice or herb mixtures. Spice and herb blends are quite common in many cuisines. When you buy most commercial chili powders, for example, you're buying chili powder mixed with other spices. Actually, you can make your own blends easily. Not only do you save some money, but you can alter the ingredient amounts to suit your taste. Simply use a bowl and wooden spoon to combine seasonings listed below in proportionately larger quantities.
NEWS
June 6, 2002
Pick up a shoe, an orange, and your cup of coffee. Now, try juggling them. Can't do it, can you? Yet, stumbling upon someone who can could turn an ordinary walk into a feel-good city experience. Skilled street performers - the jugglers, the mimes, the musicians - can be the cayenne pepper that add zing and song to a city. Philadelphia, sad to say, has little such spice. In fact, The Inquirer yesterday profiled the dwindling number of artists who play around town. Some city officials hit the right note when they talk of luring more performers to Philly streets.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 2003 | By LAUREN McCUTCHEON For the Daily News
Who says we all can't get along? Not the worldly folks at the Abbaye, the latest Northern Liberties restaurant at 3rd Street and Fairmount Avenue. Specializing in Belgian beers, this place makes the classic New Orleans sandwich with Pacific coast oysters dredged in Japanese breadcrumbs and served on Italian bread. Chef Tom Lax tops it off with a Vietnamese hot sauce that he calls "the kickin' chicken" because of the bird on the bottle. OYSTER PO-BOY FROM THE ABBAYE For the mayonnaise: 1 quart mayonnaise 1 small bunch chives 2 tablespoons lemon juice 2 cloves garlic, minced fine 1 teaspoon white pepper 1 teaspoon cayenne pepper 6 eggs 1 tablespoon dried oregano 1 tablespoon cayenne 1 tablespoon dried thyme Dash salt and pepper For the sandwich: 15 medium-sized Pacific oysters 5 cups flour Panko (rice)
FOOD
August 20, 1986 | By Gerald Etter, Inquirer Food Writer
From the highways and bayous of South Louisiana comes Terry Thompson's Cajun-Creole Cooking (HPBooks, $9.95). Thompson, a food writer and restaurant consultant, is as steeped in the ways of the Cajuns and Creoles as file gumbo is in tradition. Her attractive paperback presents a look at the roots of this interesting cuisine and explains the ethnic nuances that gave birth to it. The necessary ingredients are described, as are the people who developed them. The recipes are precise and easy to follow, and there are explanatory notes on the more unusual ingredients, as well as tips on cleaning oyster shells and executing various other kitchen chores.
FOOD
March 15, 2013 | By Stephanie Witt Sedgwick, Washington Post
Classic stuffed flounder is reimagined with a meatier fish, cod, and served with a salad of crab, corn, scallions, and pineapple.   Cod With Corn, Crab, and Pineapple Salad 4 servings For the salad:   5 ounces chopped, cored pineapple 2 tablespoons finely chopped parsley 1 tablespoon white wine vinegar 2 tablespoons olive oil 1 teaspoon sugar Salt Fresh black...
FOOD
January 17, 2013 | By Bonnie S. Benwick, Washington Post
This one-pan meal is bright, intense and satisfying. Using skin-on fish helps keep the delicate chunks from breaking up during cooking. Serve with something green on the side.   Moroccan Fish Stew 4 servings 1 large onion 1-inch piece ginger root 1 large clove garlic 1 1/4 pounds firm, skin-on white-fleshed fish fillets 1/4 cup sliced skin-on almonds 4 teaspoons olive oil 1 teaspoon ground cumin 1 teaspoon ground turmeric One 3-inch cinnamon stick Pinch cayenne pepper 14 ounces canned, no-salt- added diced tomatoes 1 cup water Sea salt 14 ounces canned, no-salt-added chickpeas 2 teaspoons honey Fresh black pepper Flat-leaf parsley, for garnish (may sub cilantro)
FOOD
March 18, 1987 | By Gerald Etter, Inquirer Food Writer
For cooks who find that digging into a bowl of chili has all the excitement of a treasure hunt, Michael McLaughlin's The Manhattan Chili Co. Southwest American Cookbook (Crown Publishers, $9.95) can provide an interesting and informative cache to explore. McLaughlin is the chef and co-owner of New York's Manhattan Chili Co. Restaurant and is recognized by authorities as an expert on chili-making. His book offers a straightforward, no-nonsense excursion into the warm world of chili.
FOOD
February 15, 1995 | by Maria Gallagher, Daily News Food Editor
Like most firefighters, New York firefighter Joseph T. Bonanno Jr. loves to eat. And like many firefighters, he loves to cook. Unlike most firefighters, Bonanno is mindful of fat and cholesterol. A certified fitness instructor and personal trainer, he met with skepticism when he began opting out of firehouse meals to cook low-fat dishes for himself. "But when two of the firefighters in my firehouse required bypass surgery, suddenly even the most cynical veteran became interested in my cooking," he writes in "The Healthy Firehouse Cookbook" (Hearst Books, $20)
FOOD
September 6, 1989 | By Karen Gillingham, Special to The Inquirer
You don't need a tandoor, the Indian clay-pit oven, to cook Chicken Sticks, Tandoori-Style. The recipe is a quick fix on the Indian tradition of threading whole chickens on long skewers to roast in the deep ovens. Cubes of chicken, coated with a spicy tandoori-inspired sauce, cook in about 10 minutes. Grill thick slices of onion alongside the chicken as a substitute for the usual accompaniment of roasted onions. A cool yogurt salad or relish, called raita in India, is another must for this menu.
NEWS
January 7, 1993 | By Jayne Feld, and Jane Reynolds, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENTS
Cat and canary and all, a homeless woman yesterday moved briefly into the municipal building, where she was sprayed with cayenne pepper mist and arrested after lunging with a survival knife at a police officer. "She tried to shishkebab me with the knife," said Officer Carmen Iacovone. Kathleen Hartley, 54, was charged with aggravated assault. She was being held in Gloucester County jail after failing to post $10,000 bail. That very morning, Camden Regional Legal Services lawyer Walter Norris had appeared before State Supreme Court Justice Alan Handler, who extended an order for the state to pay for Hartley's motel room at the Mayfair Motel in Turnersville until 11 a.m. Friday, a court spokesman said.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
FOOD
March 15, 2013 | By Stephanie Witt Sedgwick, Washington Post
Classic stuffed flounder is reimagined with a meatier fish, cod, and served with a salad of crab, corn, scallions, and pineapple.   Cod With Corn, Crab, and Pineapple Salad 4 servings For the salad:   5 ounces chopped, cored pineapple 2 tablespoons finely chopped parsley 1 tablespoon white wine vinegar 2 tablespoons olive oil 1 teaspoon sugar Salt Fresh black...
FOOD
January 17, 2013 | By Bonnie S. Benwick, Washington Post
This one-pan meal is bright, intense and satisfying. Using skin-on fish helps keep the delicate chunks from breaking up during cooking. Serve with something green on the side.   Moroccan Fish Stew 4 servings 1 large onion 1-inch piece ginger root 1 large clove garlic 1 1/4 pounds firm, skin-on white-fleshed fish fillets 1/4 cup sliced skin-on almonds 4 teaspoons olive oil 1 teaspoon ground cumin 1 teaspoon ground turmeric One 3-inch cinnamon stick Pinch cayenne pepper 14 ounces canned, no-salt- added diced tomatoes 1 cup water Sea salt 14 ounces canned, no-salt-added chickpeas 2 teaspoons honey Fresh black pepper Flat-leaf parsley, for garnish (may sub cilantro)
NEWS
May 17, 2012 | By J.M. Hirsch, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Here is a weeknight-friendly version of this classic vegetarian Egyptian street food. Koshary Makes 8 servings 1 1/2 cups basmati rice 2 tablespoons olive oil, divided 4 cloves garlic, minced 2 teaspoons ground cumin 1 teaspoon each: cayenne pepper, ground dry ginger 28-ounce can diced tomatoes 1 large yellow onion, thinly sliced 12 ounces elbow or ditalini pasta 15-ounce can...
FOOD
February 23, 2012 | By Linda Gassenheimer, McClatchy-Tribune News Service
My husband always talks longingly about his Aunt Helen Rose's Chicken Gumbo. I mentioned to her that I wished I could make her famous dish, but it takes too long, so she sent me this quick version, which my husband loves. Use fresh okra if you can, for texture. And since the dish improves with age, make extra to freeze for another quick dinner.   Aunt Helen Rose's Chicken Gumbo Makes two servings Vegetable oil spray 3/4 pound skinless chicken breast with bones, cut into several pieces 1/4 pound okra, thinly sliced (about 1 cup)
ENTERTAINMENT
September 13, 2007 | By Jim Coleman and Candace Hagen, staff
Q: I would like to make a traditional fried catfish dinner with hush puppies. Would you please send me some easy recipes and tell me the best way to prepare this meal? - Sue K. A: As a fisherman, I can tell you that although there is beauty in the simplicity of your request, beauty and catfish don't belong in the same sentence. I have always thought that with their slimy, ugly whiskers and gaping mouths, catfish would make great creatures for a B horror movie like "Attack of the Killer Farm-Raised Mississippi Catfish.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 2003 | By LAUREN McCUTCHEON For the Daily News
Who says we all can't get along? Not the worldly folks at the Abbaye, the latest Northern Liberties restaurant at 3rd Street and Fairmount Avenue. Specializing in Belgian beers, this place makes the classic New Orleans sandwich with Pacific coast oysters dredged in Japanese breadcrumbs and served on Italian bread. Chef Tom Lax tops it off with a Vietnamese hot sauce that he calls "the kickin' chicken" because of the bird on the bottle. OYSTER PO-BOY FROM THE ABBAYE For the mayonnaise: 1 quart mayonnaise 1 small bunch chives 2 tablespoons lemon juice 2 cloves garlic, minced fine 1 teaspoon white pepper 1 teaspoon cayenne pepper 6 eggs 1 tablespoon dried oregano 1 tablespoon cayenne 1 tablespoon dried thyme Dash salt and pepper For the sandwich: 15 medium-sized Pacific oysters 5 cups flour Panko (rice)
NEWS
June 6, 2002
Pick up a shoe, an orange, and your cup of coffee. Now, try juggling them. Can't do it, can you? Yet, stumbling upon someone who can could turn an ordinary walk into a feel-good city experience. Skilled street performers - the jugglers, the mimes, the musicians - can be the cayenne pepper that add zing and song to a city. Philadelphia, sad to say, has little such spice. In fact, The Inquirer yesterday profiled the dwindling number of artists who play around town. Some city officials hit the right note when they talk of luring more performers to Philly streets.
FOOD
June 7, 2000 | by Kent Steinriede, For the Daily News
Got a he-man appetite for lunch? Here are several tasty recipes for protein-rich lunch-box specials and a couple of recipes for calorie-light dressings. BILL'S BREAD 4 cups bread flour 1 1/4 cup water 2 eggs 1 package active dry yeast 1 tablespoon salt 1/4 cup powdered milk Dissolve yeast in 1/4 cup warm water (100 degrees). Mix dry ingredients together in a bowl. Dig a hole in the dry ingredients and pour in the rest of the water and eggs.
NEWS
December 30, 1996 | By Mark Fazlollah, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It was the wedding from hell: The bride's father got into an argument with the disc jockey. Two guests who had been drinking at the reception started pushing each other. Someone called 911. When he arrived at the Collegeville Inn, police officer James C. Rupell took one look at the scene, whipped out a can of Bodyguard pepper spray, held it above the crowd, and began spraying in a sweeping motion, Rupell testified later. A pregnant woman doubled over, children screamed, and guests streamed out of the basement reception hall coughing and rubbing their eyes and faces, according to testimony from witnesses at the 1993 wedding.
NEWS
December 14, 1996 | By Mark Fazlollah, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Responding to warnings that the pepper spray wielded by Philadelphia police can be deadly, Police Commissioner Richard Neal has tightened controls on use of the debilitating spray. Officers carrying the spray, which stings the eyes and drives people to their knees in convulsive coughing, are getting briefings on its potential dangers, a Police Department spokesman said yesterday. And a recent directive from Neal instructs officers not to use the spray against nonviolent suspects, orderly crowds, children, the elderly, pregnant women or people believed to be suffering from heart or respiratory problems.
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