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NEWS
July 2, 1986 | By Gail Shister, Inquirer Staff Writer
For the 19th time since March 1954, when The Morning Show debuted with Walter Cronkite, CBS is about to produce yet another version of its ever- struggling CBS Morning News. Under a "regional" format designed by new Morning News producer Susan Winston and proposed for the fall, the program will have anchors in Los Angeles and New York, and possibly Chicago and Dallas. According to published reports, current anchor Maria Shriver has been asked to take the position in L.A., where she was Morning News' West Coast correspondent for two years.
NEWS
July 26, 1986 | By Gail Shister, Inquirer Staff Writer
In an effort to pump some desperately needed life into the CBS Morning News, the network has decided to shift the long-struggling broadcast away from the news division, as of January. CBS sources said anchors Maria Shriver and Forrest Sawyer would take "extended vacations" beginning Aug. 4 and might never return to the broadcast. Who might replace them is unknown. According to an in-house memo sent yesterday by CBS News president Van Gordon Sauter, the totally revamped Morning News will be produced "by a unit to be formed within the CBS Broadcast Group.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 22, 1995 | By Gail Shister, INQUIRER TELEVISION COLUMNIST
Channel 10 anchor Jane Robelot will leave the CBS-owned station March 17 to become co-anchor of CBS Morning News, with Troy Roberts. She debuts on the network March 20. Robelot, 34, co-anchors the 6 and 11 p.m. weekday news with Ken Matz. She joined WCAU-TV in October 1990 as a general-assignment reporter, was promoted to 6 p.m. co-anchor with Larry Kane in February 1991, and in April '92 joined Kane on the 11 p.m. show. Renee Chenault, noon co-anchor with Tim Lake, will replace Robelot at 6 and 11 p.m., the station said yesterday.
NEWS
January 31, 1992 | by Francesca Chapman, Daily News Television Critic
WPVI (Channel 6) will expand its weekday morning newscast from 30 minutes to one hour, beginning March 30. The hourlong newscast will begin at 6 a.m. instead of 6:30 a.m. Anchor Monica Malpass and weathercaster Dave Frankel, who now host the morning half- hour (and also are featured on the noon news, along with Robin Garrison), will host the expanded show. An additional co-anchor is expected to be hired for the morning broadcast. "We looked at the audience levels for that time of day and what we're able to do, and just thought it would be the right thing," said WPVI news director Dave Davis.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 17, 1986 | By JOSEPH P. BLAKE, Daily News Staff Writer
Squire D. Rushnell, vice president of children's programming for ABC Entertainment, says the time is right for an animated religious-based special. So at 8 p.m. on Nov. 28 - the day after Thanksgiving - ABC (Channel 6) will broadcast something called "The Kingdom Chums," a cartoon special that tells the David and Goliath story. The "Chums" are animated animals whose ancestors witnessed various biblical happenings, such as like the birth of Christ and The Last Supper. The current generation's responsibility is to tell of those occurrences every chance they get. "Some think it's a silly idea to do stories based on the Bible," said Rushnell during an interview Friday.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 1987 | By JOSEPH P. BLAKE, Daily News Staff Writer
When CBS's "The Morning Program" made its debut last week, the critics jumped all over it. Meanwhile, the folks from NBC's "Today" show turned up their noses and the producers of ABC's "Good Morning America" reportedly just snickered. But according to a telephone poll by "Entertainment Tonight," 14,398 people said they liked the CBS show while 9,334 said they didn't. In terms of ratings, the CBS show is still in third place behind "Good Morning America," but was rated 30 percent higher than the "CBS Morning News" show it replaced.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 1987 | By JOSEPH P. BLAKE, Daily News Staff Writer
Ike Pappas, a 24-year veteran reporter with CBS News, was one of the first of 200 people to receive layoff notices sent out Friday as part of a severe cost-cutting campaign by the troubled network. Pappas reportedly was offered a job with CBS Radio Thursday but the offer was withdrawn the next morning. "I don't feel fired," said Pappas, "I feel emancipated. The people who are going to stay at CBS are going to have to get up every morning and pretend they're going to work for CBS News . . . which started to die a long time ago. " "I'm not bitter," added Pappas.
NEWS
February 22, 1995 | by Ann Gerhart, Daily News Staff Writer
The gods of CBS have decided that if Philadelphia likes Jane Robelot with a nightcap, all of America will love her with a cup of coffee. Robelot, the WCAU co-anchor at 6 and 11 p.m., is jumping to the network next month to co-anchor the hour-long "CBS Morning News," which airs weekdays at 6 a.m. She'll also have reporting duties that may land her face time on the network's evening news. "It's going to be hard leaving Philadelphia," said Robelot, who is 34 and has spent 4 1/2 years at the CBS affiliate here.
NEWS
July 16, 1986 | By Gail Shister, Inquirer Staff Writer (David Walstad contributed to this article.)
Channel 10 isn't the only station in town shopping for anchors. New York sources say that Channel 3 news director Randy Covington met with CBS Morning News' Forrest Sawyer Monday to talk about an anchor job. Sawyer, whose future with the Morning News is in doubt, would probably do the 6 and 11 p.m. newscasts if a deal can be cut. Covington yesterday had no comment about Sawyer. He says he's not looking for any male anchors at 11 p.m., where Jerry Penacoli holds court with Diane Allen.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 1986 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Staff Writer
The sun is up, the TV on. John Williams' Spielbergian horns herald the dawn as a camera glides around Lady Liberty, her crown lit from within. And from the set of studio 3B, Bryant Gumbel and Jane Pauley shuffle some papers, look into the camera and say, "Good morning. " John Palmer reads the news. Willard Scott, off someplace with Girl Scouts or Kiwanians, yaks it up until he's ordered to report that high-pressure ridge hanging over Bismarck. And then there's Gene Shalit - thinner than he used to be - bespectacled, be- mustached, be-bowtied, his eyes atwinkle as he puns his way through a "Critic's Corner" film review.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 1996 | By Gail Shister Inquirer staff writers Jonathan Storm and Lil Swanson contributed to this report
Go, Robelot! WCAU alum Jane Robelot will be the major anchor for the revamped CBS This Morning, heading a "team" that includes CBS This Morning weatherguy Mark McEwen and Jose Diaz-Balart of Miami's WTVJ, according to CBS insiders. The announcement comes today. Robelot, 35, joined CBS in March 1995 as coanchor, with Troy Roberts, of CBS Morning News. In October, she added the title of news reader for CBS This Morning. Robelot signed with WCAU in October 1990 as a general-assignment reporter, working her way up to 11 p.m. coanchor in April '92. Sources say Robelot will anchor both hours of the new CBS This Morning, to launch in August - 7-to-8 a.m. with Diaz-Balart, noon and 5:30 p.m. anchor at NBC-owned 'TVJ; and 8-to-9 a.m. with McEwen.
NEWS
February 22, 1995 | by Ann Gerhart, Daily News Staff Writer
The gods of CBS have decided that if Philadelphia likes Jane Robelot with a nightcap, all of America will love her with a cup of coffee. Robelot, the WCAU co-anchor at 6 and 11 p.m., is jumping to the network next month to co-anchor the hour-long "CBS Morning News," which airs weekdays at 6 a.m. She'll also have reporting duties that may land her face time on the network's evening news. "It's going to be hard leaving Philadelphia," said Robelot, who is 34 and has spent 4 1/2 years at the CBS affiliate here.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 22, 1995 | By Gail Shister, INQUIRER TELEVISION COLUMNIST
Channel 10 anchor Jane Robelot will leave the CBS-owned station March 17 to become co-anchor of CBS Morning News, with Troy Roberts. She debuts on the network March 20. Robelot, 34, co-anchors the 6 and 11 p.m. weekday news with Ken Matz. She joined WCAU-TV in October 1990 as a general-assignment reporter, was promoted to 6 p.m. co-anchor with Larry Kane in February 1991, and in April '92 joined Kane on the 11 p.m. show. Renee Chenault, noon co-anchor with Tim Lake, will replace Robelot at 6 and 11 p.m., the station said yesterday.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 1994 | By Lee Winfrey, INQUIRER TV WRITER
When Phyllis George returns to television tonight after an absence of nine years, an old friend named Bill is the star of her new show. President Clinton, country singer Naomi Judd and father-and-son auto racers Richard and Kyle Petty are the guests on A Phyllis George Special, at 8 on cable's Nashville Network. How do you get the chief executive to appear on your premiere? Well, if you're Phyllis George, it sounds relatively easy. Describing the process in a recent interview over lunch here, she looked as stylish as her surroundings in the Edwardian Room of the Plaza Hotel, overlooking Central Park.
NEWS
May 24, 1994 | by Richard Huff, New York Daily News
Since slipping away from the bright lights of a high-profile TV gig eight years ago, Phyllis George has had to constantly answer questions about why she's not on television. Cab drivers, ushers at the White House, bellhops, they've all asked when she'd be back on the small screen. Well, ask no more. Next month, George returns to the airwaves in "A Phyllis George Special," a series of one-hour interview programs for cable's The Nashville Network. "My choice was not to work," George recently said.
NEWS
January 31, 1992 | by Francesca Chapman, Daily News Television Critic
WPVI (Channel 6) will expand its weekday morning newscast from 30 minutes to one hour, beginning March 30. The hourlong newscast will begin at 6 a.m. instead of 6:30 a.m. Anchor Monica Malpass and weathercaster Dave Frankel, who now host the morning half- hour (and also are featured on the noon news, along with Robin Garrison), will host the expanded show. An additional co-anchor is expected to be hired for the morning broadcast. "We looked at the audience levels for that time of day and what we're able to do, and just thought it would be the right thing," said WPVI news director Dave Davis.
NEWS
January 11, 1991 | By Gail Shister Inquirer TV critic Jonathan Storm contributed to this report
Jon Katz swears he has nothing against CBS. (And if you believe that one . . . ) "I had a great time there," says the producer turned media critic, whose first novel, Sign Off (Bantam), will be out Tuesday. "I went all over the world. They paid me well. They were straight with me. They didn't brutalize me. I'm not seething with resentment. " Sign Off focuses on the once-great news division of the fictional USB network as it becomes the target of a hostile corporate takeover.
NEWS
March 31, 1988 | By Richard Reeves
It's hard to walk around Paris these days without being followed by Dan Rather. People keep asking you what you thought of Rather last night - or this morning. The CBS Evening News is broadcast five mornings a week here at 8 a.m. With the six-hour time difference, that's 2 a.m. in New York. So anyone in Paris can see Rather - with French subtitles a little more subdued than his hyped- up down-home English - seven hours after New Yorkers do. Parisians already take it for granted, of course, but it is a miracle - and so is the fact that if you have cable television here, you can get Cable News Network and the BBC. Everything is changing, literally right in front of us. A famous winemaker in Bordeaux told me that he makes his teenage sons watch Rather every morning at breakfast.
NEWS
December 1, 1987 | By Ken Tucker, Inquirer TV Critic
At 7:30 a.m. yesterday, a half-hour into the premiere edition of CBS This Morning, Harry Smith turned to his co-host Kathleen Sullivan and said, "Feels like we've been doing this for years, doesn't it?" Sullivan grinned bravely in response, and as she did, a thought must have occurred to the thousands, maybe even hundreds of people watching them: What is the big deal here? It's just another stab at a CBS morning show, right? After all, these things come and go. Twenty of these things, to be precise.
NEWS
November 30, 1987 | By Gail Shister, Inquirer Staff Writer
When will CBS stop mourning morning? CBS executives hope it's today at 7, when the network unveils CBS This Morning. It's CBS's 20th entry in the morning-broadcast sweepstakes since March 1954, when Walter Cronkite and Charlemagne - a puppet, for Pete's sake - introduced The Morning Show. Former ABC News anchor Kathleen Sullivan and Dallas-based CBS News correspondent Harry Smith, the co-hosts of CBS This Morning, are well aware of the network's pathetic track record in the morning.
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