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Cbs

ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 1986 | Daily News Staff Writers
Do the letters CBS stand for "considerable book sales?" Many authors seem to think so. At least a dozen books are now in the works purporting to tell behind-the-scenes stories about the giant television network - and most of them concern the news division. CBS has been much in the news lately, of course: Ted Turner's attempt to buy it; William Paley's return to head it; Bill Moyers' quitting, claiming that the once-respected news department is only interested in fluff; the cancellation of the "Morning News" . . . But for those who hunger to know even more, Variety, the show-biz newspaper, has compiled a list of authors who are writing books about CBS. According to Variety: Former CBS News president Ed Joyce has been paid $240,000 to write his account of his dealings with Dan Rather, among other subjects.
NEWS
September 12, 1986 | By David Bianculli, Inquirer TV Critic (The Associated Press and staff writer Gail Shister contributed to this article.)
The corporate upheavals at CBS continue to be more complex, and in some ways more riveting, than anything currently coming from the network's entertainment division. The latest seismic shift: yesterday's resignation by CBS executive vice president and president of news, Van Gordon Sauter. Sauter, an 18-year veteran of the network who ran CBS News from 1981 to 1983 and returned to the same position in December (replacing Edward M. Joyce, who was himself ousted), presided over several dismal events at CBS News.
SPORTS
May 30, 1989 | By Kevin Mulligan, Daily News Sports Writer
By suddenly announcing his retirement from baseball, Mike Schmidt went from the active list to the short list of candidates CBS Sports hopes to audition this summer for a TV analyst position. Network sources said CBS is expected to name Brent Musburger and ex- Phillies catcher Tim McCarver as its lead broadcast team in the next 10 days. The network also plans to groom a play-by-play man and analyst as its No. 2 broadcast team by working them in practice games with CBS production crews beginning in July 1. Starting next season, CBS and ESPN will assume exclusive rights to Major League Baseball on the network level.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 29, 1989 | Daily News Wire Servics
CBS Television has paid upward of $20 million for the television broadcast rights to Warner Bros.' megahit "Batman," sources said yesterday. Insiders said the blockbuster film could begin the first of several televised showings as early as May 1991. One source said the $20 million price tag comes with an escalator clause which could hike the price to about $30 million. CBS was not immediately avaiable for comment. To date, "Batman" has grossed $251 million in theatrical revenues and is the fastest selling videocassette in the country.
NEWS
June 24, 2008 | By Michael Klein and John Shiffman, Inquirer Staff Writers
CBS3 yesterday released anchorman Larry Mendte from his contract 31/2 weeks after FBI agents seized his home computer amid allegations that he illegally broke into former coanchor Alycia Lane's e-mail. Sources said an internal investigation at CBS3 disclosed that software that secretly captures keystrokes - including passwords - had been installed on a station computer. Mendte's firing came nearly six months after CBS3 fired Lane, following her arrest in New York for allegedly hitting a cop. What began as a series of gossip-page scandals embarrassing Lane has morphed into a federal criminal investigation and a sexual-discrimination lawsuit.
SPORTS
December 31, 1993 | by Bill Fleischman, Daily News Sports Writer
Wrapping up another year in tube sports . . . BIGGEST STORY OF THE YEAR: 1. The Fox Network outbidding CBS for the NFC games. 2. Launching of ESPN2. JOURNALISTS? NOT US: The day after the Fox network outbid CBS for the NFC games, NBC didn't mention the biggest deal in sports television history on "The NFL Live. " Braacck. BEST HUSTLE: NBC Sports president Dick Ebersol getting in his network's bid to keep AFC games ahead of CBS, after it knew it would lose the NFC to Fox. BEST NFL ANALYST: 1. John Madden (CBS)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 1987 | By JOSEPH P. BLAKE, Daily News Staff Writer
CBS has compiled a series out of several pilot shows that didn't make the network's fall lineup. Under the banner "The CBS Summer Playhouse," the programs debut Friday night at 8 on Channel 10. An anthology of rejected shows with a fancy title is an interesting concept, but the kicker is that CBS will ask viewers to call in after each show to tell whether they liked it or not. Any program that gets enough positive reaction might eventually be...
NEWS
March 6, 2005 | By Gail Shister INQUIRER TELEVISION COLUMNIST
Despite the stink of Memogate, the nasty shots from colleagues, and the indignity of relinquishing his anchor chair a year before he had planned, Dan Rather still pledges allegiance to CBS. "For better or worse, I love this place and the people in it," he says in an interview. "I am loyal to it, without apology. I like everybody here, and I mean everybody. Even the ones who don't think much of me. . . . "I'll stand with them till hell freezes over, then cut through the ice. " Rather, 73, ends his unprecedented 24-year run as anchor and managing editor of CBS Evening News on Wednesday.
NEWS
May 28, 1991 | By Francesca Chapman, Daily News Staff Writer
The good news in CBS' 1991-92 schedule is not that an obvious hit will debut, but that the best series from the past year, whose fates were in some doubt, will return in the fall. Although CBS unveiled a slate of four new sitcoms, a new version of the "The Carol Burnett Show" and two dramas on Friday, the biggest news was that "Northern Exposure" and "The Trials of Rosie O'Neill," two of CBS' on-again, off-again, critically acclaimed series, have a spot in the fall lineup. "Northern Exposure," which premiered in the spring of 1990, then disappeared for almost a year, met with new praise and high ratings when it returned this spring Mondays at 10 p.m. It will return to the same spot in the fall, nicely capping CBS's terrific, and unchanged, Monday night lineup.
SPORTS
February 6, 1992 | By Glen Macnow, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The last time CBS covered the Winter Olympics, the network offered three afternoons of black-and-white coverage. Viewers did not see the U.S. hockey team win its first gold medal because CBS brought no cameras to the arena in Squaw Valley, Calif. That was 1960, when the rights to broadcast the Games cost $50,000. This is 1992, and CBS has paid $243 million for the Albertville Olympics. With such an investment, the network will broadcast about 120 hours of the XVI Winter Games.
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