FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
August 6, 1986
Dale Mezzacappa's July 14 article, "MOVE haunting Powelton," was a jounalistic disappointment - to put it politely - and a real disservice to the Community Education Center. The CEC is a vital resource to Powelton Village and to organizations citywide. It's one of the few places where low-budget organizations can afford to meet or perform regularly, whether they're bicyclists or recyclers, cloggers or square dancers. The CEC is also important to several hundred children who use it year round.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 1986 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
One recent Wednesday night, a group of about 30 people sat on a melange of folding and padded chairs at one end of a large, bare and somewhat disheveled room. Black dropcloth partly covered windows at the room's far end; humming fluorescent lights hung from the ceiling; a standing fan whirred. Here and there, cracks snaked along one wall, and ancient blackboards, long unused, wrapped around two others. No one much noticed these appointments, for those present were gathered for an evening of performance at the Community Education Center in Powelton Village, the city's latest - can it be?
NEWS
July 24, 1987 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Community Education Center has reached a tentative agreement with the city Redevelopment Authority that will give CEC a long-term lease on its building at 35th Street and Lancaster Avenue. The agreement will make it possible for the CEC, which has emerged in the last few years as a center for experiment in the performing arts, to make much-needed capital improvements in its building and to obtain substantial additional financing. Besides the lease, which includes an option to buy, the Redevelopment Authority also has agreed to provide a sizable loan for roof and major repairs.
NEWS
July 20, 2012 | By Joelle Farrell, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
New Jersey State Comptroller Matthew Boxer warned corrections officials in June 2011 of problems at the state's 20 privately operated halfway houses. He mentioned escapes, inadequate security, and seemingly toothless state oversight in a 24-page audit report. But it was not until the New York Times last month exposed violence, drug use and gang activity inside halfway houses operated by a company with a tie to Gov. Christie that the New Jersey Legislature called for answers. A Senate panel will hold its first hearing on the issue Thursday.
NEWS
July 31, 2010 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Three former prison guards have sued the Delaware County prison, alleging religious, sexual, and racial discrimination after they were fired for not cutting their hair, which they say their religion forbids. Nigel LeBlanc, Eugene Briggs and Zayid Bolds, all of Philadelphia, are followers of the Rastafarian movement, which prohibits cutting hair on the head, including facial hair, according to their lawsuit. They were asked to choose between their jobs and their religion, said Jennifer L. Zegel, attorney for the men. The prison is run by the New Jersey-based Community Education Centers (CEC)
NEWS
March 8, 2013 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
More than $1.6 million was distributed Wednesday by the Philadelphia Cultural Fund to 244 different groups at a City Hall ceremony. Grant recipients, up from 197 last year, received awards ranging from a few hundred dollars to about $10,000. The Cohen Award, named after the late Councilman David Cohen, is given to an organization demonstrating commitment to social justice. Blackboard Labs, an East Falls-based organization devoted to hip-hop writing, recording, and after-school programs, was this year's recipient.
NEWS
July 14, 1986 | By Dale Mezzacappa, Inquirer Staff Writer
On a sweltering night in June, more than 100 people crammed into a small room at St. Andrew's and St. Monica's Episcopal Church for a meeting of the Powelton Village Civic Association. Davis Woodward was the model of decorum as he presided over a vote by the group, one of the most active and shrewd neighborhood organizations in the city. As president of the civic association, Woodward, an accountant who has lived in Powelton for 14 years, made sure the broadest possible range of views was heard on the issue at hand.
NEWS
July 20, 2012 | By Joelle Farrell, INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
TRENTON - As inmates' last stop before reentering society, halfway houses help people stay clean and find jobs, and most follow the rules and eventually go home, operators of the facilities told a state Senate panel Thursday. But corrections officers and a former halfway house employee said drugs, violence, and escapes are the norm at some of the state's 20 halfway houses - all privately run - and often many of the occupants are prisoners awaiting trial rather than release. "When the inspectors leave is when the problems start," said Joe Amato, a corrections officer at the Essex County jail.
NEWS
August 27, 2010 | By WILLIAM BENDER, benderw@phillynews.com 215-854-5255
The privately run George W. Hill Correctional Facility has been struggling this summer with what you might call a prisoner-retention problem. Delaware County authorities discovered this month that two inmates had been mistakenly released from the prison due to clerical errors. Neither has been heard from since. It's the fifth time that this has happened in recent months, according to a county official. The prison, operated by New Jersey-based Community Education Centers for $43 million a year, made headlines in June when accused killer Taaqi Brown walked out because of a records snafu.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 12, 2013 | By Joelle Farrell, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
Nearly two years after a state audit showed security problems and poor financial oversight at New Jersey's privately operated halfway houses, lawmakers took a first step toward creating a task force to study the reentry centers. Lawmakers in the New Jersey Senate and Assembly introduced 11 bills in December that would require sweeping changes to the halfway-house system: more visits and reports by state corrections staff, more financial disclosures by halfway-house vendors, and the creation of a task force.
NEWS
March 8, 2013 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
More than $1.6 million was distributed Wednesday by the Philadelphia Cultural Fund to 244 different groups at a City Hall ceremony. Grant recipients, up from 197 last year, received awards ranging from a few hundred dollars to about $10,000. The Cohen Award, named after the late Councilman David Cohen, is given to an organization demonstrating commitment to social justice. Blackboard Labs, an East Falls-based organization devoted to hip-hop writing, recording, and after-school programs, was this year's recipient.
NEWS
July 21, 2012 | By Joelle Farrell, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
TRENTON - As inmates' last stop before reentering society, halfway houses help people stay clean and find jobs, and most follow the rules and eventually go home, operators of the facilities told a state Senate panel Thursday. But corrections officers and a former halfway house employee said drugs, violence, and escapes are the norm at some of the state's 20 halfway houses - all privately run - and often many of the occupants are prisoners awaiting trial rather than release. "When the inspectors leave is when the problems start," said Joe Amato, a corrections officer at the Essex County jail.
NEWS
July 20, 2012 | By Joelle Farrell, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
New Jersey State Comptroller Matthew Boxer warned corrections officials in June 2011 of problems at the state's 20 privately operated halfway houses. He mentioned escapes, inadequate security, and seemingly toothless state oversight in a 24-page audit report. But it was not until the New York Times last month exposed violence, drug use and gang activity inside halfway houses operated by a company with a tie to Gov. Christie that the New Jersey Legislature called for answers. A Senate panel will hold its first hearing on the issue Thursday.
NEWS
August 27, 2010 | By WILLIAM BENDER, benderw@phillynews.com 215-854-5255
The privately run George W. Hill Correctional Facility has been struggling this summer with what you might call a prisoner-retention problem. Delaware County authorities discovered this month that two inmates had been mistakenly released from the prison due to clerical errors. Neither has been heard from since. It's the fifth time that this has happened in recent months, according to a county official. The prison, operated by New Jersey-based Community Education Centers for $43 million a year, made headlines in June when accused killer Taaqi Brown walked out because of a records snafu.
NEWS
August 26, 2010 | By WILLIAM BENDER, benderw@phillynews.com
The privately run George W. Hill Correctional Facility has been struggling this summer with what you might call a prisoner-retention problem. Delaware County authorities discovered this month that two inmates had been mistakenly released from the prison due to clerical errors. Neither has been heard from since. It's the fifth time that this has happened in recent months, according to a county official. The prison, operated by New Jersey-based Community Education Centers for $43 million a year, made headlines in June when accused killer Taaqi Brown walked out because of a records snafu.
NEWS
July 31, 2010 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Three former prison guards have sued the Delaware County prison, alleging religious, sexual, and racial discrimination after they were fired for not cutting their hair, which they say their religion forbids. Nigel LeBlanc, Eugene Briggs and Zayid Bolds, all of Philadelphia, are followers of the Rastafarian movement, which prohibits cutting hair on the head, including facial hair, according to their lawsuit. They were asked to choose between their jobs and their religion, said Jennifer L. Zegel, attorney for the men. The prison is run by the New Jersey-based Community Education Centers (CEC)
NEWS
May 18, 2009 | By Merilyn Jackson FOR THE INQUIRER
Good things can indeed come in small packages, as dancer-choreographer Shavon Norris proved when she unwrapped two small, power-packed works at the Community Education Center over the weekend. To open, she danced her 2007 solo Said, a remembrance of things said to her as a child. In a pool of warm light, her movements began small - hips, then shoulders, then arms flying out - and gradually enlarged until she was moving full out across the floor. Norris, a CEC resident artist this year, wore a simple peach frock and cornrowed hair that gave her a little-girl look.
NEWS
April 26, 2004 | By Merilyn Jackson FOR THE INQUIRER
Two unexpected dramas made for a nightmarish dance evening in the New Edge Mix series at Community Education Center Friday. The most serious incident occurred near the concert's end, during a work by choreographer Michael Roberts, who danced the role of Judas in the misnamed Novena. It was more a goth version of The Passion of the Christ than a prayer cycle. Midway through the performance, George Alley, portraying Jesus, took a rather bad - and unscripted - fall. When he turned over, blood poured from his forehead.
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