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Ceilings

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REAL_ESTATE
May 16, 1997 | By Sheila Dyan, FOR THE INQUIRER
Old Quaker Building, University City Look up - way up - in an apartment at the Old Quaker Building, and you might consider dancing on the ceiling. That's because some of those ceilings, which are up to 20 feet high, are the original wood ones. Also seen in many of the apartments in the renovated historic buildings of this University City complex are original exposed brick walls, occasional structural columns, and original oversized windows. "It's fantastic. They have those high ceilings that make you feel like you're living in a huge apartment," said Elie Vidal, a retired professor of literature and philosophy.
NEWS
February 25, 1988 | By Sheila Dyan, Special to The Inquirer
After 10 years as a painting contractor in Bucks and Montgomery Counties, Anthony J. "Tony" Chieffo looked up and found his niche: textured ceilings. Seven months ago, Chieffo rigged up a van-mounted mixer/tank and started a company in Ivyland called Ceilings Beautiful that specializes in texturing ceilings with sprayed-on polystyrofoam. Not content to texture two ceilings in five to eight houses a week, Chieffo, 35, aims to become the Ray Kroc of textured ceilings by franchising his idea.
NEWS
September 24, 1991 | By Gwen Florio, Inquirer Staff Writer
If there was one thing the Depression taught Emily May Edwards, it was how to save. Edwards, of Media, was 31 when the stock market crashed. She had been saving for 60 years when she died in December. Not money - the Depression had shown her how unreliable that could be - but things, reassuring by their very presence and quantity. Take a moment and try to imagine 60 years' worth of things. The broken toaster, the wobbly chair, the too-small clothes, the too-worn shoes, the scratchy records, the odd salt shaker - all the things you've tossed over the years.
NEWS
November 17, 2002 | By Michael Walsh FOR THE INQUIRER
Those cathedral ceilings so popular in newer homes can be problematic to decorate. Perplexing even. True, high-altitude architecture conveys a sense of spaciousness that ordinary 8-foot ceilings cannot possibly match. The trouble is, those high ceilings have a tendency to make whatever is put under them seem smaller. Normal-size sofas and chairs can look like dollhouse furniture. It is the same with extra-tall walls. Framed artwork that looks perfectly proportionate on an 8-foot wall may look like a postage stamp on a wall 12 or 16 feet high.
NEWS
December 7, 2001 | By Sheila Dyan FOR THE INQUIRER
The Glen at Lafayette Hill has a few things going for it: It's new, bright, spacious, and conveniently located. "I signed a lease after seeing only a picture," Julia Mailey said. A widow and retired secretary for the Frankford Arsenal, Mailey was the first to move into her building, just two years ago. "I wanted a garage, and I can go from the garage right into my building, across the hall from my first-floor apartment. There's a washer and dryer, high cabinets, a built-in microwave, big windows, high ceilings . . . it's just delightful.
NEWS
January 30, 1998 | By Monica Rhor, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Eighth graders from Camden's Bonsall Family School, displaced for the last two weeks by building renovations, will be shifted to the former Jewish Community Center building in Pennsauken under a plan approved last night by the Camden Board of Education. The school district wants to lease the building for 60 days. Bonsall's entire eighth-grade class, now divided between the Forest Hills Elementary School and the Brimm Medical Arts High School, will use eight classrooms at the former community center on Route 70. The shifting of 300 of the school's 900 students has magnified problems, such as overcrowding and lack of educational materials, at those other schools.
REAL_ESTATE
December 4, 1998 | By Sheila Dyan, FOR THE INQUIRER
Locust Point, Center City, Philadelphia Locust Point brings old and new together on the waterfront, providing a residential experience that is nothing like living on the moon. Or so says Jason Reynolds, 27, a student in Wharton's M.B.A. program, who recently returned from a two-year stint in Iceland with the Navy. "That was a lot like living on the moon. And this is nothing like that," Reynolds said. The high ceilings and 12-foot windows of the former industrial building particularly please Reynolds.
NEWS
October 31, 1994 | By Laura Genao, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Giving a polished, if not genteel, look to the game that made hustlers and sharks notorious is the goal of the Pockets Cafe & Billiards Club. Maybe it's the Ralph Lauren wallpaper and the 25-foot ceilings, or the arched windows, or the dance club and the full bar, as well as the thrill of the game, that are attracting customers. Whatever the reason, the 17 regulation-size billiards tables are full almost every night. "This place goes against the traditional concept of the smoke-filled back room with burly guys all around," said Bob Slagon, a 45-year-old patron of the club.
REAL_ESTATE
September 24, 1993 | By Marguerite P. Jones, FOR THE INQUIRER
Heatheridge, Montgomery Township, Montgomery County. Walking through Heatheridge's Camelot model, it's not uncommon to hear potential buyers saying, "I bet that's an upgrade," or, "That's not standard. " But more often than not, they're wrong. "You're looking at a standard house," Peggy Shelton Varani said of the model. Varani, director of business development for the David Cutler Group, the developer, and sales coordinator Kristin Kelly say they spend plenty of time telling visitors to the model that, yes, that feature is included in the Heatheridge package.
REAL_ESTATE
March 1, 1992 | By Marguerite P. Jones, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Energy tightwads and sun-worshipers will bask in the glow of Clearview Estates. In the Georgian model, five windows line up in the family room; two more and a sliding glass door are on display in the kitchen area, and two large windows let the rays into the dining room. Bay windows warm up both the study and the living room. In the Georgian, the master bedroom is not the only bedroom graced with more than one window. Each of the children's bedrooms features two to four windows.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
REAL_ESTATE
May 24, 2015 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
A few weeks back, I replied to a reader's question about "ghost shadows" on his ceiling. It isn't as spooky as it sounds. The reader was asking about paint he could use to hide the lines, which reappeared after he had painted the ceiling three years ago. Of course, I responded to his request for a paint recommendation by suggesting a shellac-based product that I have used to cover water stains from leaks that have been repaired and to keep...
REAL_ESTATE
January 18, 2015 | By Catherine Laughlin, For The Inquirer
From the moment the elevator doors open in Alfred "Fred" Hagen's ultrachic penthouse, the swooning begins. The unit, spanning the top two floors of a trendy 12-story boutique building in Society Hill, is the pinnacle of stylish city living. Floor-to-ceiling windows stretch across the 4,000-square-foot residence, where breathtaking views pan from the city's corporate center to the stadium complex to the Delaware River, where the Ben Franklin Bridge arcs in the wake of cruising cargo ships.
SPORTS
June 2, 2014 | By Matt Gelb, Inquirer Staff Writer
There is always a story, and that is because scouts love stories. They were there for the moment The Next Great Thing was discovered. Like that time six years ago when Marti Wolever and Mike Ledna - two top amateur scouts for the Phillies - lingered at the Salisbury School's baseball field in Connecticut long after the other teams' scouts departed. Wolever asked Anthony Hewitt, a lanky 19-year-old high school shortstop, if he would mind holding an impromptu personal workout. A school official pulled the batting cage into place.
NEWS
May 25, 2014 | By Thomas Fitzgerald and Jessica Parks, Inquirer Staff Writers
Rep. Allyson Schwartz blamed sexism when she bumped against the glass ceiling of Pennsylvania politics last week, finishing a distant second in the Democratic primary for governor. "The Harrisburg establishment . . . couldn't imagine even a woman with my experience and accomplishments could actually be the governor," she said in her concession speech Tuesday. And Marjorie Margolies, the woman trying to succeed Schwartz in the U.S. House, said Pennsylvania women would suffer because her loss likely means the state's congressional delegation will be all-male.
REAL_ESTATE
December 29, 2013 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
It was a long stretch of disappointing monthly billings reports from the American Institute of Architects, reflecting the prolonged housing downturn and the reluctance of homeowners and, indeed, builders, to commit to spending great sums as prices continued to fall. Reflecting the general flattening of the market over the last few months, the most recent billings index (for October) saw lower numbers, though it remained above the score of 50, indicating a rise. The big positive, however, was an uptick in inquiries about projects somewhere down the line - meaning that while Americans remain insecure about the economy, they expect it to improve.
REAL_ESTATE
November 4, 2013 | By Sally Friedman, For The Inquirer
It was the first house that would be all her own, and back in 2004, interior designer Bridget McMullin was looking for one thing: potential. She had just opened her studio, the McMullin Design Group in Haddonfield, and wanted to be closer than she had been in Sea Isle City, N.J., her former address. "I couldn't afford very much, and that definitely narrowed the field. So when I saw this house in Collingswood, I knew it had good bones and, yes, definite potential. " Not that it was a prize specimen back then.
NEWS
November 4, 2013 | BY BARBARA LAKER, Daily News Staff Writer lakerb@phillynews.com, 215-854-5933
IT'S ALL ABOUT the ceiling. The glass ceiling, that is. Speaking yesterday at the Pennsylvania Conference for Women, former Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton said gender inequality must be erased in America. "Too many women here and around the world still face ceilings, ceilings that hold back their ambitions and aspirations, that make it harder for them to pursue their own God-given potential," Clinton said in her keynote address. "These ceilings just don't hold back women and girls but they hold back entire economies and societies because no country can truly thrive by denying the contributions of half its people," she said, calling remedying gender inequality "the great unfinished business of the 21st century.
NEWS
March 6, 2013
I GET A CHILL whenever I listen to James Brown soulfully sing "It's a Man's World. " I especially like to shout, "You got that right!" when he says, "But it wouldn't be nothing, nothing without a woman or a girl. " Those lyrics come to mind as we celebrate Women's History Month - it's not a man's world anymore. Sunday marked 100 years since thousands of women marched down Pennsylvania Avenue demanding the right to vote. They were taunted and pushed, but they pressed on. So, too, have women pressed their way into jobs in the private and public sectors.
NEWS
January 24, 2013 | WASHINGTON POST
WASHINGTON - Forget about raising the federal debt limit. House Republicans are proposing to ignore it altogether - at least until May 18. The House plans to vote Wednesday on a measure that would leave the $16.4 trillion borrowing limit intact but suspend it from the time the bill passes until mid-May. The declaration that the debt ceiling "shall not apply" means that the government could continue borrowing to cover its obligations to creditors until May 18. This approach - novel in modern times - would let Republicans avoid a potentially disastrous fight over the debt limit without actually voting to let the Treasury borrow more money.
NEWS
January 4, 2013 | By Zachary A. Goldfarb, Washington Post
WASHINGTON - Only hours after Congress adopted a bill to avoid the fiscal cliff of tax increases and spending cuts, lawmakers Wednesday began to clash over the limit on federal borrowing, inaugurating the next phase of Washington's permanent fiscal war. Republicans said they would press their demand that spending be reduced dramatically in exchange for allowing any more U.S. borrowing. President Obama and top Democrats insisted that their goal of raising the $16.4 trillion federal debt ceiling was nonnegotiable.
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