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Ceilings

NEWS
September 24, 1988 | By James McCartney, Inquirer Washington Bureau
The United States and the Soviet Union yesterday wound up two days of high- level meetings unable to report significant progress in improving any part of their relationship. President Reagan declined to make a public statement after saying goodbye to Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard A. Shevardnadze, but Secretary of State George P. Shultz described the sessions as "pick and shovel work. " Shultz said that although many hours were spent trying to narrow differences in the crucial area of arms control, results were, at best, "mixed.
BUSINESS
June 21, 1990 | By Anthony R. Wood, Inquirer Staff Writer
Oscar Mayer Foods Corp. plans to close its East Coast distribution center in South Philadelphia next year, company officials said yesterday. The South Front Street center, which employs 122 people, including warehouse workers and drivers, no longer fits the company's needs, the officials said. The 321,000-square-foot facility opened in 1969 as a meat-processing plant, but production stopped in 1986 partly because of "lower operating costs at other Oscar Mayer plants," said facility manager John Choyka.
NEWS
July 9, 1987 | By Suzanne Gordon, Inquirer Staff Writer
Proposed improvements to the Chatham Park Elementary School came under careful scrutiny Tuesday by a Haverford school board member who questioned the architect who is recommending $1 million in renovations to the property. Board member Michael Burke asked architect Daniel C. Dagit of Dagit Associates in King of Prussia about the educational benefits of the proposals. Burke objected to a new heating system, new ceilings and new lighting in the classrooms and hallways - changes that would cost the district $300,000.
NEWS
June 18, 2004 | By Sheila Dyan FOR THE INQUIRER
With its tiers of arched windows, heavy cornices, terra-cotta trim, and Corinthian and Doric columns, 116 South Seventh Street, in the heart of Jewelers' Row, looks like a classically detailed gem. "The architecture in the city is so taken for granted, and it shouldn't be," said Ruth Douglas, 58, associate director of human resource information systems at Community College of Philadelphia and a resident of the building for four years. "I was in a brownstone, but I wanted something brighter and newer.
NEWS
January 25, 1987 | By Ann Marie Escher, Special to The Inquirer
Strawbridge & Clothier this month undertook renovation of the interior of its department store in the Exton Square shopping mall. The new look will cost Strawbridge & Clothier $1.14 million, according to a building permit issued for the construction. The renovation work is expected to last until October. The store will have new wall facades, arches, carpets and drop ceilings, and shiny new lighting fixtures. "It's part of an ongoing renovation program," said William Timmons, public relations representative for the Strawbridge stores.
NEWS
February 8, 2002 | By Sheila Dyan FOR THE INQUIRER
When the former home of Penn-Lippincott Publishing Co. (circa 1910) was converted to apartments by Historic Landmarks for Living in the late 1980s, what remained of the original structure was everything big - huge windows, towering columns, spacious rooms, high ceilings. Newly added, however, were the kinds of intimate spaces that can make an industrial building feel like home. Providing a dramatic entrance to the 110 one- and two-bedroom apartments is the controlled-access lobby, which boasts a 30-plus-foot ceiling and mammoth walls of glass.
NEWS
May 3, 2002 | By Sheila Dyan FOR THE INQUIRER
Reconfiguring industrial spaces into residential apartments can be one of the most challenging aspects of historic conversions, but it can also be one of the most aesthetically rewarding. Often, more than one building is involved, each with its own style, and the renovator must deal with unusually high ceilings and awkward industrial expanses with huge exterior windows and dimly lit interiors. The need to use the space available without corrupting historic details can give rise to creative floor plans.
REAL_ESTATE
September 10, 2004 | By Sheila Dyan FOR THE INQUIRER
In the 100 block of 13th Street, a Renaissance Revival building with Beaux Arts classicism stands in stark contrast to the contemporary Convention Center directly across the street. Distinguished by three-story Corinthian pilasters between broad planes of newly restored windows, graceful arches, and an ornate bracketed cornice above dentil molding, the seven-story brick structure is trimmed with limestone and terra-cotta. Banded and fluted Corinthian columns flank its entrance.
REAL_ESTATE
May 23, 1993 | By Marguerite P. Jones, FOR THE INQUIRER
Weatherlea, Collegeville, Montgomery County Ceilings in Weatherlea's homes may make you think of the great outdoors: In room after room, they climb toward the skies. In some spaces they level off, in others they peak into cathedral ceilings. In all cases, they create air and light for the Realen Homes single-family abodes that dot this land in Collegeville. The Wrenfield model, which starts at $297,900 and is the most popular, opens with a two-story foyer that lends drama and brightness to the entryway.
NEWS
November 4, 2013 | BY BARBARA LAKER, Daily News Staff Writer lakerb@phillynews.com, 215-854-5933
IT'S ALL ABOUT the ceiling. The glass ceiling, that is. Speaking yesterday at the Pennsylvania Conference for Women, former Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton said gender inequality must be erased in America. "Too many women here and around the world still face ceilings, ceilings that hold back their ambitions and aspirations, that make it harder for them to pursue their own God-given potential," Clinton said in her keynote address. "These ceilings just don't hold back women and girls but they hold back entire economies and societies because no country can truly thrive by denying the contributions of half its people," she said, calling remedying gender inequality "the great unfinished business of the 21st century.
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