CollectionsCells
IN THE NEWS

Cells

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
May 6, 2006 | By Marie McCullough and Carrie Budoff INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
U.S. Sen. Rick Santorum (R., Pa.) yesterday called for federal funding of research that would involve creating an altered human embryo - one that could yield precious stem cells but not implant in a uterus. Santorum, who has steadfastly opposed embryonic stem-cell research in the past, joined Sen. Arlen Specter (R., Pa.), a vocal proponent of the research, in introducing a compromise bill on the politically popular issue. The bill would require the National Institutes of Health to find and fund new methods for obtaining human embryonic stem cells in the hope of developing therapies.
NEWS
December 30, 2007 | By Kristin E. Holmes INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
John Brick calls it "the hangover circuit. " It happens November through New Year's Eve, when the Solebury scientist and researcher starts getting calls from people wanting to know the skinny on that nauseating, head-throbbing, hand-shaking experience. Why do sufferers see rooms that spin, get headaches that are mind-numbing, and maybe even wake up next to people they don't remember? After 30 years of studying the effects of drugs and alcohol, Brick has become a go-to guy. This year, he decided to write it all down in The Doctor's Hangover Handbook: The Intelligent Person's Guide to Curious and Scientific Facts About Alcohol and Hangovers.
NEWS
September 21, 1989 | By Joseph Yaskin, Special to The Inquirer
When the Lower Gwynedd Township Police Department began using its two new holding cells one month ago, acting police Chief Ken Bright thought the department would save time and money. No longer would patrol officers have to transport prisoners to holding cells in Lansdale - at a cost of $25 a night - because Lower Gwynedd did not have its own jail. But the cells have turned out to be a constant headache for Bright and the department's 16 officers in the month that has followed their completion.
NEWS
January 19, 2007 | CHRISTINE M. FLOWERS
TO PARAPHRASE Churchill, never has something so small promised so much and yielded so little. That "something" is the most rudimentary form of life, the embryo. Scientists are adamant that stem cells extracted from embryos hold the promise for curing debilitating diseases like Parkinson's and diabetes. But after years of research and unrealistic expectations, the results are still disappointing - and likely to be so for quite some time. As Maureen Condic, a neurobiologist at the University of Utah observed, "The promised miraculous cures have not materialized even for mice, much less for men. " Particularly troubling is the fact that embryonic stem cells tend to form tumors when transplanted into adult tissue, a fact that many proponents seek to play down.
NEWS
June 29, 1990 | By Kathy Brennan, Daily News Staff Writer
The holding cells in City Hall look like Dante's Inferno under Plexiglas. Hundreds of prisoners are crowded into trash-filled pens with transparent walls and few urinals. There isn't enough room for everybody to sit down, so some of them have to stand for hours, waiting to appear in court. Yesterday about 200 men shouted and gestured as reporters and photographers toured their cells at the invitation of Sheriff John Green and Allen Hornblum, newly appointed sheriff's office chief of staff, who are trying to get more cell space.
NEWS
September 1, 2005
IWAS DISAPPOINTED to read Ben Burrows' tangent-riddled response to my letter on the success of adult stem cells. Astute readers will notice, of course, that Burrows didn't even try to refute anything that I originally wrote, but rather smeared the Web site I referenced and made a fallacious analogy to Galileo. (I'm fairly certain that Galileo Galilei didn't destroy embryonic human beings while demonstrating that our planet revolves around the sun.) The site, stemcellresearch.
NEWS
September 29, 1988 | By Dan Hardy, Special to The Inquirer
Norwood Borough Councilman Gary Schubert has expressed concern that the borough might be held liable if harm befalls Norwood prisoners while they are in holding cells at the Darby Borough Jail. Speaking at Monday's Borough Council meeting, he suggested that Norwood consider building its own holding cells at the Norwood police station. His comment follows the suicide earlier this month of a Darby teenager, Octavis Long, in the Darby jail. "We may not save any money on a day-to-day basis by building cells and holding people here, but if we're litigated against just once, because someone is harmed in another jail, that would cost us a lot," Schubert said.
NEWS
December 7, 2006 | Reviewed by David J. Montgomery, For The Inquirer
Next By Michael Crichton HarperCollins. 448 pp. $27.95 Michael Crichton has made a career out of taking hot-button scientific or political topics and spinning them into fast-moving, high-concept adventure novels. He did it with cloned dinosaurs in Jurassic Park, global warming in State of Fear, and time travel in Timeline. Now Crichton has given us Next, a blockbuster science thriller that tackles the subject of genetic manipulation. With stem cells, embryonic research, and predicted miracle cures so much in the news, the topic is great fodder for headlines.
LIVING
September 20, 1999 | By Faye Flam, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In some scientists' vision of the future, laboratory-grown flesh and blood, organs and tissues will be used as replacement materials for the human body. A team from Thomas Jefferson University has taken that a step closer to reality by identifying a rare type of blood cell that can be coaxed to regrow a patient's complete blood supply - red cells, various types of white cells and platelets. The researchers still have to figure out how to get these cells, called hematopoietic stem cells, to multiply faster.
NEWS
August 20, 2000
Research into stem cells, the cells that build the body's various tissues and organs, received two boosts last week. Britain said it would consider loosening its ban on human cloning to give researchers access to the basic cells. In the United States, the National Institutes of Health proposed for the first time using public money to study stem cells from discarded embryos obtained from couples undergoing fertility treatment. Each controversial proposal is disallowed, and each will be opposed by those who say that scientists are playing God. Researchers believe that stem cells could one day provide cures for disabilities such as stroke and spinal-cord injury, or grow organs for transplant.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 27, 2016 | By Mike Newall, Columnist
It was clear throughout the trial that Chaka Fattah never thought it would happen - never thought it could happen - that he would really lose it all. Through four weeks of damning testimony, the 11-term congressman who had so long dominated the stratosphere of Philly politics came across as all cool confidence and smiles. He smiled after prosecutors explained how he orchestrated an illegal $1 million loan for his floundering 2007 mayoral campaign and then paid it back with stolen money.
NEWS
June 1, 2016 | By Stu Bykofsky
AT A glance, Joey Warchal knew something was very wrong. He loved everything he saw during a tour of Eastern State Penitentiary - Al Capone's cell most of all, but something was very wrong. A tour guide said the Prohibition-era gangster was incarcerated in 1929 and 1930. "The radio featured in the display is historically inaccurate," Warchal politely emailed Eastern State Penitentiary senior vice president Sean Kelley after his tour. "As an antique collector specializing in radios," Warchal said "the radio displayed is a Philco A-361, made in January 1942," after Capone had departed Eastern State.
NEWS
May 23, 2016 | By Marie McCullough, Staff Writer
One of the biggest challenges for the companies now racing to develop T-cell therapies for cancer is figuring out how to make personalized, living products on an assembly-line scale. Each patient's own T-cells - the soldiers of the immune system - must be siphoned from the blood, coaxed to multiply, genetically engineered to recognize and attack cancer cells, then returned to the patient. Now, Cellectis, a French biotechnology company partnering with Pfizer, says it has used gene-editing technology to achieve a major advance: a "universal" T-cell product, made with healthy donor cells and used "off-the-shelf.
NEWS
May 12, 2016
One person was airlifted to a hospital after a fire was reported in an inmate's cell Tuesday evening at Graterford prison in Montgomery County, authorities said. Firefighters responded to the reported fire shortly after 6 p.m. at the State Correctional Institution Graterford in Skippack Township. The fire was extinguished and the person, who was not identified, was transported to an area hospital to be treated for burns, authorities said. The cause of the fire was not immediately available.
REAL_ESTATE
May 9, 2016 | By Alan J. Heavens, REAL ESTATE WRITER
Security is an issue no matter where you live or in what, and condominiums are no exception. From Weiser Lock Corp., the lock manufacturer, come some ways to be safe in your condo building. It should go without saying, but be mindful of others even when you're inside your building, says Weiser expert Steve Kolobaric. Pay attention when walking in stairwells, meet your neighbors, and know the general layout of the building, he said. If the front entrance to your condo requires a key pass, don't feel it's rude not to hold the door open for someone just behind you. "Just think - if they're a tenant, they should be happy that you're not letting unknown people into the building," Kolobaric said.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 24, 2016 | By Marie McCullough, STAFF WRITER
Temple University researchers used a gene-editing technique to remove HIV DNA from the type of human immune cells where the virus can maintain a simmering reservoir of infection. The experiment, building on the researchers' previous HIV gene-editing work, was conducted in T cells growing in lab dishes. Whether it works in actual patients remains to be seen. Still, the study bolsters the concept that HIV, the virus that causes AIDS, can be cured, not just controlled in a latent stage by antiviral drugs.
NEWS
March 17, 2016 | By Tom Avril, Staff Writer
University researchers and biotech firms worldwide are racing to study a powerful new gene-editing technique that holds the promise to treat hereditary diseases. Along with them is Michael Zhang, a senior at Conestoga High School. The 18-year-old from Berwyn just won a $75,000 prize for his work in the field. He was one of nine high school students recognized Tuesday night in Washington in the national Intel Science Talent Search. Asked if he had plans for his prize money, Zhang said it would go toward his tuition at Harvard University.
NEWS
January 15, 2016
Talking on a cellphone while driving in the Holland Tunnel to Jersey City, N.J., resulted in the arrest of a man wanted on a warrant in West Chester, a Port Authority Police Department spokesman said Wednesday. The arrest happened about 7 p.m. Tuesday night, after police pulled over a U-Haul rental van in the tunnel. A police statement said the driver, Mitchell Neil Thompson, 24, of 1205 Elm St. in Reading, had been driving erratically because he was busy with a cellphone. "The fingers of his right hand were manipulating the screen and his eyes were not on the roadway," the statement said.
TRAVEL
January 4, 2016
When traveling abroad, it's rather easy to unwittingly run up huge bills on your cellular phone. Consider the international options provided by your cellular carrier, as well as ways you can use a phone on your trip to minimize unpleasant surprises. Most major cellphone companies offer some type of international plan so U.S.-based phones will work overseas. Coverage is quite good in populated areas, and alliances between carriers in different countries often mean a seamless voice/data/text experience.
NEWS
January 4, 2016 | By Sandy Bauers, For The Inquirer
What will 2016 bring in the way of medical advances? As president and CEO of Philadelphia's University City Science Center, an incubator of medical research, Stephen Tang has an uncommon vantage point on that question. He predicts gene therapy, an experimental technique that uses genes to treat or prevent disease, and health information technology will boom this year. He spoke to us recently about the center and what lies ahead.   Tell us more about the Science Center.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|