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Celtic Music

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ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 2010 | By David Hiltbrand INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
At the Philadelphia Flower Show, the crowd is snaking along the pathway through the Irish garden display, their eyes intently raking the underbrush as if engaged in an Easter egg hunt for adults. In a corner of the exhibit's colonnaded courtyard, largely unnoticed, Moya Brennan is singing a haunting rendition of "Down by the Salley Gardens," accompanied by a harpist and a fiddler. That she is drawing so little attention is remarkable. Imagine stumbling across Aretha Franklin singing "(You Make Me Feel Like)
NEWS
March 16, 1996 | by Rob Lowman, Los Angeles Daily News
For Celtic music artists such as Enya, Van Morrison, the Chieftains and Clannad, the road to success has a certain logic. After all, they're Irish. For Loreena McKennitt, who hails from western Canada, it wasn't so much a road as a leap of faith. "In 1985, I borrowed $10,000 from my family to make my own record," McKennitt said recently by telephone from Ireland, where she was preparing for her next album and an appearance on an Irish TV show. With the help of a do-it-yourself book on how to sell self-made recordings and set up your own label, she began her career.
NEWS
March 13, 1998 | by Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
As sure as the coming of shamrocks and green beer each March 17, your favorite music shop is now stocked to the gills with a new crop of albums celebrating Irish culture. This year, you might be suprised by the variety of the offerings. Sparked by crossover successes like Enya and the stage production of "Riverdance," with its contempo-folk score by Bill Whelan, many's the Irish artist who's getting away from the old-fashioned definition of Celtic music - the hearty fighting ditties like "The Wild Colonial Boy" and quaint ballads 'bout girls disguising themselves as cabin boys to ship off with their loved one. Spirit of Eden's debut album, "The Sun & the Moon & the Stars," starts out with traditional Celtic melody and instrumentation, but is transformed into a true world-music romp.
NEWS
July 20, 1998 | By Blair Clarkson, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Nelson MacPherson studied respiratory therapy for four years in college, which he said hasn't helped him much in his career as an accordion player in a Scottish band. "I guess I don't really use any of my education," said MacPherson, a native of Ontario. "But I do get to play music and wear a kilt and go to festivals, so it's not so bad. " And MacPherson wasn't the only one in his band, Hadrian's Wall, who was happy to have the chance to don the traditional attire of Scotland.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 1994 | By Sam Wood, FOR THE INQUIRER
Loreena McKennitt isn't the first to make a pilgrimage. Thousands of souls preceded her. But McKennitt is probably the first to include Glenside's Keswick Theater on her holy quest. McKennitt is a flaxen-haired Canadian harpist who began her career during the mid-'70s as a coffeehouse folkie. And as heard Wednesday at the Keswick, there's still a lingering taste of cappuccino pop in her music. But since taking up Celtic music a decade ago, McKennitt's explorations have led her into richer territory.
NEWS
February 21, 2008 | By Jess Kamen FOR THE INQUIRER
There's no shortage of Irish bands in the Philadelphia area, and Chester County's Beyond the Pale is a good example. Beyond the Pale, who play original, Celtic-inspired music as well as traditional Irish songs, will perform at Kildare's Irish Pub in West Chester on Sunday. The sextet has released two albums, Beyond the Pale and Hill of Sallows; the latter received a rave review in Irish Music Magazine. "The band writes original music that's meant to inspire people, but we also play the old traditional songs that inspired us," said founding member Stephen Dowdall, who plays guitar and sings.
NEWS
March 17, 2000 | by Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
For musicians of Irish descent and stylistic approach, St. Patrick's Day is both a gold mine and a bit of a tease. There's no better time of year to be touring the United States, says Leo Moran of the Saw Doctors, the Galway folk-rock group who'll be rousing the crowd at TLA tomorrow night. And there's no better time to be marketing Irish CDs than around St. Patrick's Day, says Cindy Byram, publicist for Shanachie Records. "Truth is, the holiday doesn't have the same importance at home as it does over here," said Moran in a phone chat from the Saw Doctors' tour bus, on his way to Philadelphia.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 25, 1999 | By Tom Infield, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When we last saw them in Philadelphia, they were hosting the best New Year's Eve party in years at the Spectrum. Now the Barenaked Ladies - an alternative band gone mainstream - is returning to head a diverse cast of rock and rollers who will participate in the third annual Y100 Festival at the E-Centre on Aug. 3. Canada's BNL will be joined at the Y100 (that's WPLY-FM to non-listeners) show by a diverse cast of bands, some of which has yet to be announced. The list so far includes The Offspring, Everlast, Luscious Jackson, G Love & Special Sauce, Lit and Fuel.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 8, 1987 | By DAVE BITTAN, Daily News Staff Writer
Robert Palmer, the British "blue-eyed soul singer," stars tonight at midnight on "Live Jam" on WYSP (FM/94). The music on the hour-long program is from Palmer's live album, "Maybe It's Live," recorded at the Dominion Theater in London in 1980 and released in 1982. It includes two monster hits - "Every Kinda People" (1978) and "Bad Case of Loving You" (1979). Palmer's latest smash was "Addicted to Love. " Tonight at 8, WHYY (FM/91) broadcasts the third in a series of four live programs by Curtis Institute of Music alumni.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 2013 | By Nicole Pensiero, For The Inquirer
Leo Moran of Ireland's Saw Doctors says it happens every year right around this time: He'll run into a slew of fellow Irish musicians at the airport, all heading across the pond to play St. Patrick's Day gigs. "It's become such a tradition for so many Irish musicians," Moran said by phone from Ireland. "The States make more of St. Patrick's Day than anywhere else in the world, so you see each other at the airport, all carrying our instrument cases. " Indeed, there will be no shortage of Celtic music - originating from Ireland, Canada, and even the United States - on area stages over the next couple of weeks.
TRAVEL
May 8, 2011
10 for the Road You can plan now to attend these weekend events, occurring within a few weeks and within a day's drive of Philadelphia. 1. Shawnee Celtic Festival. May 28-29. Shawnee, Pa. Get a taste of Irish culture in the Pocono Mountains. Celtic music on three stages, parades, Irish step dancers, and traditional Celtic cuisine. 570-421-7231; www.shawneemt.com . 2. Taste of Cincinnati. May 28-30. Cincinnati. Sample dishes from more than 40 eateries at this annual restaurant exhibition.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 2010 | By David Hiltbrand INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
At the Philadelphia Flower Show, the crowd is snaking along the pathway through the Irish garden display, their eyes intently raking the underbrush as if engaged in an Easter egg hunt for adults. In a corner of the exhibit's colonnaded courtyard, largely unnoticed, Moya Brennan is singing a haunting rendition of "Down by the Salley Gardens," accompanied by a harpist and a fiddler. That she is drawing so little attention is remarkable. Imagine stumbling across Aretha Franklin singing "(You Make Me Feel Like)
NEWS
February 21, 2008 | By Jess Kamen FOR THE INQUIRER
There's no shortage of Irish bands in the Philadelphia area, and Chester County's Beyond the Pale is a good example. Beyond the Pale, who play original, Celtic-inspired music as well as traditional Irish songs, will perform at Kildare's Irish Pub in West Chester on Sunday. The sextet has released two albums, Beyond the Pale and Hill of Sallows; the latter received a rave review in Irish Music Magazine. "The band writes original music that's meant to inspire people, but we also play the old traditional songs that inspired us," said founding member Stephen Dowdall, who plays guitar and sings.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 27, 2005 | By Mike Zebe INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Now that there's a break from the heat, it's a perfect time to pack up your lawn blanket and cooler and head to the 44th Annual Philadelphia Folk Festival. This musical and cultural treasure is in Philadelphia's backyard, a little over an hour from the city at the Old Pool Farm in Upper Salford Township, Montgomery County. Don't think "folk music" is just a bunch of people strumming guitars and singing "This Land Is Your Land. " This is folk broadly defined, including bluegrass, country, honky-tonk blues, Cajun fiddle, a cappella singing from Eastern Europe, foot-stomping Celtic rock, sea chanteys, and some things you've probably never heard of before.
NEWS
October 27, 2002 | By Valerie Reed INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Joanna Mell's early piano lessons were very frustrating. At age 5, she found that the keyboard was getting in her way. "I couldn't get the sound I wanted with the plastic keys," Mell said. "I always wanted to reach in and touch the strings. " It wasn't until she was 34 that she put fingers to strings on her first harp. Within two years, she was performing professionally on the harp. Now, at 49, she has recorded seven CDs, performs at festivals and coffeehouses, and brings the harp's soothing melodies to hospice patients.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 16, 2001 | By Martha Woodall, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
"Get up! Get up! Get Up! Let's go now!" sang Nathan Williams, the accordion player and the Nathan in Nathan & the Zydeco Cha Chas. The zydeco faithful who had turned out for another night of bayou-inspired dancing in Conshohocken organized by Allons Danser raised their hands in the air and clapped while they spun and swayed to the infectious syncopated beat. "Is everybody having a good time?" he asked. "Is everybody feeling all right?" The crowd roared its approval. Mardi Gras time may be when the world at large pays tribute to the hot and spicy musical gumbo concocted in Louisiana.
NEWS
March 17, 2000 | by Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
For musicians of Irish descent and stylistic approach, St. Patrick's Day is both a gold mine and a bit of a tease. There's no better time of year to be touring the United States, says Leo Moran of the Saw Doctors, the Galway folk-rock group who'll be rousing the crowd at TLA tomorrow night. And there's no better time to be marketing Irish CDs than around St. Patrick's Day, says Cindy Byram, publicist for Shanachie Records. "Truth is, the holiday doesn't have the same importance at home as it does over here," said Moran in a phone chat from the Saw Doctors' tour bus, on his way to Philadelphia.
NEWS
October 7, 1999 | By Cynthia J. McGroarty, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The Carroll Family will perform at a benefit for the Bucks County Celtic Library at Bucks County Community College Saturday. The five-member group plays many of the traditional instruments of Celtic cultures, including the tin whistle, mandolin, dulcimer, Uillean pipes and bodhran, and performs a repertoire of traditional Irish, Welsh and Scottish music. The group will share the stage with Irish step dancers and storyteller Tom Slattery as well as other guests. The program starts at 7:45 p.m. in the college auditorium.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 8, 1999 | By Terry Conway, FOR THE INQUIRER
On the one hand, it's a long journey from the Lobby Bar in Cork, Ireland, to O'Friel's Irish Pub here. On the other, it's really not. At a show sponsored by the Green Willow Folk Club on a recent Monday evening, audience members packed the pub's 130-seat listening room, quaffing pints of Guinness stout and Harp lager while savoring the spirited sound of Nomos, a nine-year-old quartet that plays its hometown Lobby Bar when it's not touring....
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