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NEWS
August 13, 1989 | By Jonathan Berr and Larisa Kuntz, Special to The Inquirer
For the fourth time in seven years, the Lower Southampton Planning Commission has voted down a request to rezone a parcel of land near the White Chapel Gardens Memorial Park on Street Road. The commission voted 5-2 Thursday to turn down Frank and Donna Meli's request to change the zoning on the site at Street Road and Bustleton Pike from a cemetery to a commercial use. Several commission members expressed reservations about a three-story office building the couple has proposed for the land.
NEWS
October 17, 1992 | by Dave Racher, Daily News Staff Writer
The six partygoers celebrated inside the cemetery, but mourned as they were about to leave. That's because Troy Cooper, 21, and two of his armed gang were there to hold them up Jan. 15, Assistant District Attorney Rayford A. Means said. The gang specialized in graveside robberies. Cooper, of 25th Street near Dauphin, pleaded guilty Thursday to six counts of robbery and one charge of conspiracy. Common Pleas Judge James J. Fitzgerald deferred sentencing at the request of defense lawyer William Stewart, who wants two murder cases pending against Cooper to be decided first.
NEWS
April 3, 2000 | by Myung Oak Kim, Daily News Staff Writer
Sunday mornings at the Trinity Church Oxford in Lawndale are usually serene and peaceful. Parishioners stroll along a sidewalk, surrounded by towering sycamore and huge dogwood trees. They pass rows of neatly kept tombstones, bearing reminders of former parishioners from as far back as the 1700s. They walk into the red-carpeted church built in 1711 and accented with stained-glass windows. But yesterday, parishioners got a glimpse of the ugliness of petty crime. Sometime after 11 p.m. Friday, someone knocked over and broke nine tombstones in the cemetery, on Longshore Avenue near Rising Sun Avenue.
NEWS
April 9, 1999 | by Ron Avery, Daily News Staff Writer
It was a peaceful country cemetery that became a foul, fetid dumping ground and a hangout for drug pushers and addicts. But a handful of stubborn Quakers and neighbors refused to abandon historic Fair Hill Burial Grounds in North Philadelphia. Their commitment and cleanup work will be rewarded tomorrow at a ceremony placing the site on the National Register of Historic Places. Several mayoral candidates and District Attorney Lynn Abraham will speak at the 10 a.m. ceremony, when a historic marker will be placed at the cemetery on 9th Street between Cambria and Indiana.
NEWS
March 13, 1986 | By Ruth Tallmadge, Special to The Inquirer
The East Whiteland Board of Supervisors has approved subdivisions of the Philadelphia Memorial Park and the Haym Salomon Memorial Park, but no development plans have been submitted for the land. The owners, members of the Houck family who live in communities in northern Chester County, filed for subdivisions to meet financial requirements in connection with their purchase of the land last summer, according to their attorney, Stephen Aichele. Aichele said about half of each park was used as a cemetery and that additional land would be reserved for the cemeteries.
NEWS
July 18, 1998 | By S. Joseph Hagenmayer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Teresa "Tess" J. Celia Sansone, 84, supervisor of New St. Mary's Cemetery in Bellmawr for 34 years, died July 7 at West Jersey Hospital-Voorhees. A Haddonfield resident for the last three years, she was born in Philadelphia and raised in Camden. Mrs. Sansone worked for the Archdiocese of Camden for 52 years. Her husband, the late Andrea Sansone, began working at the Bellmawr cemetery in 1940. Three years later, he was named superintendent, and the couple moved into the old Glover Farmhouse, which was the superintendent's quarters on the 100-acre cemetery.
NEWS
April 11, 1999 | By Karen E. Quinones Miller, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The venerable Fair Hill Burial Ground has been in North Philadelphia for nearly three centuries. But in the last 15 years, it had become so overgrown with weeds and shrubs that it seemed only junkies and prostitutes remembered it existed. Yesterday morning, the newly cleaned cemetery - the final resting place of some of Philadelphia's most famous Quakers and abolitionists - was added to the National Register of Historic Places, which should mean it will not be forgotten again. It is not a huge cemetery, only about 4 1/2 acres tucked away between Germantown Avenue and Indiana, Cambria and Ninth Streets.
NEWS
April 21, 2006 | By Susan Snyder INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Philadelphia schools chief Paul Vallas said yesterday that he intended to build a new Frances E. Willard Elementary School on the site of a former cemetery in Kensington even though the district would have to excavate the remains of more than 150 people. The district will build the school at 1930 E. Elkhart St. if it can obtain the site, which the city owns, Vallas said. The city originally asked the district to pay $750,000 for the parcel. Jacqueline Barnett, Mayor Street's education secretary, said the city generally sought "fair-market value" for property.
NEWS
May 30, 1990 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Special to The Inquirer
It's a quiet tribute to American military veterans that is tucked away in the rolling, wooded landscape of Burlington County. But the 184-acre, state-operated Brigadier Gen. William C. Doyle Veterans Memorial Cemetery in Arneytown is a perpetual monument to deceased veterans from throughout New Jersey. "We are very proud of the facility because it reflects a respect and admiration for the people who served our country," said John P. Rotondo, chief executive officer of the cemetery.
NEWS
December 13, 1998 | By Louise Harbach, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Just five gravestones survive in the Stratton Burial Ground, although there could be as many as 800 people buried in the graveyard that predates the founding of the municipality. Now, the Medford Historical Advisory Group is improving the appearance of the graveyard on Stokes Road. With funds left over from the township's 150th birthday celebration in 1997, the group is purchasing a wrought-iron fence to install along the front and two sides of the one-acre property. Last year, the group installed a historical marker, one of 30 that members bought to mark significant sites in the township.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 8, 2016 | By Jeff Gammage, STAFF WRITER
CARLISLE, Pa. - Mary Kininnook died three days after her 14th birthday, weak and struggling to breathe, in a hospital bed at the Carlisle Indian Industrial School. But precisely where her body lies, no one knows. Twice family members traveled here from Alaska, searching the school cemetery and checking the name on every headstone, only to learn she was likely buried in one of the graves marked "unknown. " "I had to call my mom - 'Mom, we can't find her. Nobody knows where she is,' " said Eleanor Hadden, an Alaska anthropologist and Kininnook's great niece.
BUSINESS
August 17, 2016 | By Harold Brubaker, STAFF WRITER
StoneMor Partners L.P., a Trevose owner and operator of cemeteries and funeral homes, on Monday announced a $12 million deal involving 16 Wisconsin cemeteries and a granite importing and finishing business. StoneMor, which is best known in the Philadelphia region for leasing and operating cemeteries owned by the Archdiocese of Philadelphia, said it had already acquired 10 of the Wisconsin cemeteries and would either buy or manage an additional six, depending on whether it receives consents.
NEWS
August 8, 2016
Every week, Euell Nielsen sets out on her mountain bike on what might strike some as a macabre mission. She pedals through the gates of a cemetery, selects a section of graves, takes out her camera, and snaps a picture of every tombstone she passes, row upon row upon row. As a contributor to the website Findagrave.com, Nielsen, of Lansdowne, is one of thousands of volunteers who are preserving images of headstones worldwide, expanding a...
NEWS
June 25, 2016 | By Jeff Gammage, Staff Writer
CARLISLE, Pa. - There's no doubt that Earnest Knocks Off, son of a Sioux chief, lies buried among nearly 200 children in the Indian cemetery here. The question is, where? He seems to have two separate headstones. Other grave markers on the grounds of what was the Carlisle Indian Industrial School, now the Army War College, contain partial or misspelled names, wrong dates of death, and missing birth dates. The supporting paper archive is incomplete. Now, as the Army begins to meet tribal demands to return the remains of boys and girls who died in a harsh, turn-of-the century experiment in forced assimilation, both sides face a dilemma: When century-old records are lacking and even headstones can be unreliable, how to fully account for the dead?
NEWS
June 17, 2016 | By Stephan Salisbury, Culture Writer
The Mutual Burial Ground of Kensington, long gone and largely forgotten, has been recommended for historic certification by a panel of the Philadelphia Historical Commission. At a meeting Wednesday, panel members heard a rare appeal not on behalf of a memorable structure, but for preservation of what cannot be seen at 1834-48 Frankford Ave. Where two old brick garages now stand, one housing the soon-to-shutter Sculpture Gym, Point Breeze developer Ori Feibush wants to build about 40 residential units.
NEWS
June 1, 2016 | By Stephan Salisbury, Staff Writer
Ken Milano is a Kensington guy. He's lived there all his life, as his parents did, and their parents. Milano is fascinated by the old, gritty neighborhood's history, those who lived there - and died there, too. That's why, when he heard the grizzled brick garages in the 1800 block of Frankford Avenue were going to be demolished, he got that queasy feeling deep in his Kensington-loving gut. Where others saw old garages, Milano saw the 19th...
NEWS
May 31, 2016
By Ron Grossman Just as we have on previous Memorial Days, my wife and I will play "Taps" Monday in a small-town cemetery. Our habit began after we read an editorial about Americans losing sight of the holiday's meaning, thinking of it as the seasonal start of trips to picnic grounds and summer cottages. That idea wasn't new, but it was accompanied by a story about the dwindling ranks of buglers. Now, there was a problem with which we could help out. We play the harmonica, which can mimic a bugle's mournful sound.
NEWS
May 30, 2016 | By Charles Fox, STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER
CARLISLE, Pa. - A group of American Indians have come every Memorial Day weekend since 1973 to the cemetery of the old Carlisle Indian Industrial School. A vigil of sorts, they have come over the decades when others lived too far away and others had simply forgotten. They come to honor the students who died while attending school there and to decorate their graves. The practice was originally started by the American Indian Society of Washington, D.C. and carried on the last three years by Circle Legacy.
NEWS
May 30, 2016 | By Edward Colimore, For The Inquirer
The tree was a living link to more than 160 years of Philadelphia history, and a favorite spot for tourists and history buffs. Ulysses S. Grant, Benjamin Harrison, and Rutherford B. Hayes - all Civil War generals and U.S. presidents - once sheltered beneath its branches at Laurel Hill Cemetery in the city's East Falls section. Legendary Union Gens. Philip Sheridan, William Tecumseh Sherman, Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain, and Dan Sickles were there, too, on the same gentle slope overlooking the Schuylkill.
NEWS
May 20, 2016 | By Valerie Russ, Staff Writer
FRED DeBERARDINIS, a lifelong South Philadelphian and World War II Navy veteran, died Wednesday. He was 91. Mr. DeBerardinis grew up near 13th and Morris Streets, and was a member of the second graduating class of Edward Bok Vocational High School in 1942. During World War II, he served in the U.S. Navy. Later, he worked for General Electric at the GE Philadelphia Service Shop for 40 years. After marrying his wife of 66 years, Antoinette Caccavo DeBerardinis, he raised his family in South Philadelphia.
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