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Cemetery Ridge

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NEWS
January 9, 2000 | By Cynthia J. McGroarty, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
After the bloody Battle of Gettysburg, Union soldier John Lynch wrote home: "With what gratitude I feel towards All Mighty God for his marvelous protecting care which he has shown toward me in this last engagement. It seems almost incredible after going through what I have in the last two days that I am yet spared - not a scratch. " Nearly incredible, indeed. The Philadelphia Brigade, to which Lynch belonged, sustained high casualties at Gettysburg, taking the brunt of a charge by the Confederate Army on Cemetery Ridge on the battle's final day. More than 500 men were killed, wounded or missing in action.
NEWS
April 13, 2008 | By Amy Worden INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For almost 40 years, the visitor center here was more than just a front-row seat on the Gettysburg battlefield. The complex, surrounded by acres of asphalt, sat directly on what many consider sacred ground: the Army of the Potomac's defensive line on bloody Cemetery Ridge, from which the Union troops fended off the Confederates during the first three days of July 1863. The visitor center "was right in the middle of what we were trying to preserve and protect," said Scott Hartwig, supervisory historian at Gettysburg National Military Park.
NEWS
October 6, 2003 | By Kevin Dale INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Terry Jones remembers his loves of art and history joining as early as grade school, when he made pen-and-ink copies of magazine woodcuts depicting the Civil War. The 56-year-old sculptor can even recall the first library book he borrowed, at age 9, from the Ridley Park library: The Military Commanders of World War II. "My whole life, one of my best friends has been the study of history," said Jones, who just completed his largest commission: the...
NEWS
May 31, 2009 | BY EDWARD COLIMORE INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Cullen Aubrey couldn't sell the newspapers fast enough. Every Union soldier seemed to want a copy of The Inquirer. Amazingly, the paper carried news of the first day's fighting at Gettysburg, Pa., before the outcome of the three-day battle was known. "The papers went like gingerbread at the state fair," wrote Aubrey, an industrious newsboy who later described the response in a book, Reflections of a Newsboy in the Army of the Potomac. The sales of the paper - and the coup of getting the news coverage on the battlefield so quickly - was only possible because of The Inquirer's star reporter, Uriah Hunt Painter.
NEWS
July 3, 1997
America is at once the modern world's longest-lived democracy and a relatively young nation. The paradox was driven home powerfully Tuesday at Gettysburg, the place where the United States' survival reached its gravest crisis. Two living links to the Civil War shook hands and kissed cheeks during a ceremony on the 134th anniversary of the watershed battle's first day. Two women of 90-plus years, who long ago were wed young to aged veterans. One white, one black. One the widow of an Alabama private, the other of a former slave.
NEWS
May 31, 2009 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
Cullen Aubrey couldn't sell the newspapers fast enough. Every Union soldier seemed to want a copy of The Inquirer. Amazingly, the paper carried news of the first day's fighting at Gettysburg, Pa., before the outcome of the three-day battle was known. "The papers went like gingerbread at the state fair," wrote Aubrey, an industrious newsboy who later described the response in a book, Reflections of a Newsboy in the Army of the Potomac. The sales of the paper - and the coup of getting the news coverage on the battlefield so quickly - was only possible because of The Inquirer's star reporter, Uriah Hunt Painter.
NEWS
July 6, 2013
The most mistaken passage of Abraham Lincoln's Gettysburg Address predicted: "The world will little note nor long remember what we say here. ... " Of course, remembering Lincoln's 272 words proved to be far easier than preserving the great battlefield he stood upon. One hundred fifty years after the Civil War's most pivotal and bloody battle, government officials and preservationists have not only expanded the hallowed ground dramatically, from the 17-acre cemetery Lincoln dedicated to the nearly 6,000 historic acres the national park encompasses today.
NEWS
September 21, 2008 | By Amy Worden INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Imagine you have a front-row seat for one of the most dramatic battles ever fought on U.S. soil. You're surrounded by the bloody battle scene known as Pickett's Charge - fallen soldiers, galloping horses, smoke from cannon fire, a blur of blue and gray. It's the climax of the three-day Battle of Gettysburg, with Confederate Gen. George Pickett's soldiers unleashing a full-frontal attack on Maj. Gen. George Meade's Union forces entrenched on Cemetery Ridge. The charge will spring to life again starting Friday, with the unveiling of the newly restored, 377-foot-long, 42-foot canvas in the round, The Battle of Gettysburg, just as it did when French artist Paul Philippoteaux introduced it in Boston in 1884.
NEWS
March 16, 2003 | By Joseph S. Kennedy INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Late in the afternoon of July 3, 1863, about 13,000 Virginians from Gen. George Pickett's division stepped out of the woods at Seminary Ridge and began an advance with parade-ground precision over more than a mile of open ground toward the Union position at Cemetery Ridge in Gettysburg. Soldiers of the 69th Pennsylvania Volunteers, positioned in the center of the Union line, watched as a fury in the form of gray columns converged on them. This was to become the climactic action of what many historians believe was America's greatest battle.
NEWS
July 3, 1998
One-hundred-thirty-five years ago today, George Pickett charged. Two-hundred-twenty-two years ago tomorrow, John Hancock signed. With doomed bravery across a Pennsylvania farmfield, the general from Virginia tried to undo what the merchant from Massachusetts had helped create with a flourish. The Battle of Gettysburg. The Declaration of Independence. Two watersheds of the American experiment, each a focal point of Pennsylvania's rich historic legacy, each to be remembered by thousands of visitors to the state this weekend.
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NEWS
July 9, 2013 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
For about a half hour, the farm fields outside Gettysburg trembled and the air shook with the power of the guns, just as they had 150 years before. About 140 cannons unleashed a steady, thunderous fire, piercing gray clouds of smoke with yellow muzzle flashes, like lightning bolts. More than half of them were aimed at a line of men in blue who hugged the ground along a stonewall as concussive blasts thumped chests and the acrid odor of burnt gunpowder wafted by. Then silence, smoke lifting, and an unforgettable sight - thousands upon thousands of soldiers in butternut and gray, as if on parade, flags waving, muskets shining.
NEWS
July 6, 2013
The most mistaken passage of Abraham Lincoln's Gettysburg Address predicted: "The world will little note nor long remember what we say here. ... " Of course, remembering Lincoln's 272 words proved to be far easier than preserving the great battlefield he stood upon. One hundred fifty years after the Civil War's most pivotal and bloody battle, government officials and preservationists have not only expanded the hallowed ground dramatically, from the 17-acre cemetery Lincoln dedicated to the nearly 6,000 historic acres the national park encompasses today.
NEWS
May 29, 2013 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
Standing on Hancock Avenue, Terry Jones easily imagines what happened that hot summer afternoon 150 years ago. The smoke from an artillery bombardment lifts like a curtain, and 12,000 gray-clad soldiers march across an open field as if on parade. Red battle flags with the blue St. Andrew's cross flutter overhead, officers' swords rise skyward, and a forest of musket barrels and bayonets gleams in the sun. The objective: a small clump of trees on Cemetery Ridge, the center of the federal line where a native Philadelphian, Brig.
NEWS
September 27, 2010 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Old Baldy came home Sunday. And it was a fine new home, and homecoming, for the preserved head of one of the most famous horses in the land, at the Grand Army of the Republic Museum in the city's Frankford section. Old Baldy was no thoroughbred, just a handsome, brown horse with four white feet and a white blaze on his face. But he survived a Triple Crown of his own - shrapnel to the nose and flank at the First Battle of Bull Run, a shot through the neck at Antietam, and a musket ball to the belly at Gettysburg that finally ended his combat service.
NEWS
April 2, 2010 | By Amy Worden INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For more than a decade, the Los Angeles architect Dion Neutra has waged a personal battle to save his family's controversial legacy on the Gettysburg battlefield. A half-century ago, he worked alongside his world-famous father, the architect Richard Neutra, on construction of the Cyclorama Center, designed to house a massive circular painting depicting Pickett's Charge. In 1999, the National Park Service announced its intention to move the painting and tear down the building - which sits in the middle of the battle line where Union troops defended Cemetery Ridge - to restore the landscape to its 1863 appearance.
NEWS
May 31, 2009 | BY EDWARD COLIMORE INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Cullen Aubrey couldn't sell the newspapers fast enough. Every Union soldier seemed to want a copy of The Inquirer. Amazingly, the paper carried news of the first day's fighting at Gettysburg, Pa., before the outcome of the three-day battle was known. "The papers went like gingerbread at the state fair," wrote Aubrey, an industrious newsboy who later described the response in a book, Reflections of a Newsboy in the Army of the Potomac. The sales of the paper - and the coup of getting the news coverage on the battlefield so quickly - was only possible because of The Inquirer's star reporter, Uriah Hunt Painter.
NEWS
May 31, 2009 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
Cullen Aubrey couldn't sell the newspapers fast enough. Every Union soldier seemed to want a copy of The Inquirer. Amazingly, the paper carried news of the first day's fighting at Gettysburg, Pa., before the outcome of the three-day battle was known. "The papers went like gingerbread at the state fair," wrote Aubrey, an industrious newsboy who later described the response in a book, Reflections of a Newsboy in the Army of the Potomac. The sales of the paper - and the coup of getting the news coverage on the battlefield so quickly - was only possible because of The Inquirer's star reporter, Uriah Hunt Painter.
NEWS
September 21, 2008 | By Amy Worden INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Imagine you have a front-row seat for one of the most dramatic battles ever fought on U.S. soil. You're surrounded by the bloody battle scene known as Pickett's Charge - fallen soldiers, galloping horses, smoke from cannon fire, a blur of blue and gray. It's the climax of the three-day Battle of Gettysburg, with Confederate Gen. George Pickett's soldiers unleashing a full-frontal attack on Maj. Gen. George Meade's Union forces entrenched on Cemetery Ridge. The charge will spring to life again starting Friday, with the unveiling of the newly restored, 377-foot-long, 42-foot canvas in the round, The Battle of Gettysburg, just as it did when French artist Paul Philippoteaux introduced it in Boston in 1884.
NEWS
April 13, 2008 | By Amy Worden INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For almost 40 years, the visitor center here was more than just a front-row seat on the Gettysburg battlefield. The complex, surrounded by acres of asphalt, sat directly on what many consider sacred ground: the Army of the Potomac's defensive line on bloody Cemetery Ridge, from which the Union troops fended off the Confederates during the first three days of July 1863. The visitor center "was right in the middle of what we were trying to preserve and protect," said Scott Hartwig, supervisory historian at Gettysburg National Military Park.
NEWS
December 30, 2003 | By Amy Worden INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The struggle to save America's Civil War battlefields began not long after the last shots were fired in that bloody conflict almost 140 years ago. With the streams of visitors came an army of motels, fast-food outlets and souvenir shops. By the 1980s, battlefields were squeezed by even larger developments - losing an acre every 10 minutes by one estimate. But here at Gettysburg National Military Park, preservationists have taken the offensive, waging a campaign to take back the battlefield from commercial interests and restore it to its prewar condition.
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