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Censorship

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NEWS
January 28, 2012 | By David Crary, Associated Press
NEW YORK - Twitter, a tool of choice for dissidents and activists around the world, found itself the target of global outrage Friday after releasing plans to allow country-specific censorship of tweets that might break local laws. It was a stunning role reversal for a youthful company that prides itself in promoting unfettered expression, 140 characters at a time. Twitter insisted its commitment to free speech remains firm, and sought to explain the nuances of its policy, while critics - in a barrage of tweets - proposed a Twitter boycott and demanded that the censorship initiative be scrapped.
NEWS
June 30, 1986
The argument put forward by Claude Lewis against censorship of pornographic material reeks of middle-class naivete and selfishness. Of course "intelligent people" are capable of exercising their own discretion when it comes to buying Playboy and the like, but unfortunately not everybody is as obviously intelligent as Mr. Lewis. What I suspect is that pornography can motivate some less intelligent elements of our society to develop bad attitudes and perhaps even aggression against women.
NEWS
June 9, 1988 | By Lisa G. Karoly, Special to The Inquirer
"Of all things in the world, you can't obliterate ideas," John Francis Marion, author and historian, said in a lecture last Thursday night titled "Censorship and the Arts. " In a largely anecdotal talk at the All Saints Episcopal Church, 9601 Frankford Ave., Marion, 66, told tales of writers he knew who were blacklisted in the '50s and offered his opinion on the banning of Mark Twain's Huckleberry Finn and James Joyce's Ulysses. The lecture, sponsored by the Northeast Philadelphia Cultural Council and the Philadelphia Department of Recreation, was part of a program made possible by a grant from the Philadelphia City Council in celebration of the 200th anniversary of the Constitution.
NEWS
May 18, 1988 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
Does the increasing concentration of media ownership - of newspapers, TV and radio stations, bookstores and movie houses - somehow inhibit the free flow of ideas? Are we in the midst of a corporate squeeze on knowledge and information? And does this point to a new kind of censorship, a censorship of the marketplace? The dimensions of the question are evident in Philadelphia no less than in many other places. The city's two major newspapers are owned by the same Miami-based corporation.
NEWS
April 9, 1992 | By Jeff Kaye, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
An Emmy-award winning British television documentary about artistic censorship in the United States is facing problems being shown in America because of a $2 million lawsuit filed against its producers by Donald Wildmon. Wildmon, a fundamentalist minister best-known for organizing advertiser boycotts against TV programs that his American Family Association deems morally offensive, appears in the film discussing his philosophical views and operational tactics. Although he consented to appear in the documentary, Wildmon says its producers violated an agreement not to screen the work in the United States without his permission.
NEWS
April 27, 1999 | By Debbie Woodell
True confession: I love the long version of Dire Straits' "Money for Nothing. " I'm listening to it now, in fact. Sure, I squirm at the lines about "the little faggot. " But not much more than when I recall that band leader Mark Knopfler edited the song for radio airplay after protests from gay people. I would have preferred he let the song stand or fall strictly on its own artistic merits. Ultimately, though, the song was his. He can do with it what he chooses, and he chose to remove the offensive part.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 1993 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Damned in the U.S.A, a thoughtful and even-handed British documentary about censorship and pornography, boasts a credential that very much proves its point: One of the key figures portrayed in the film tried to have it banned in the U.S.A. After cooperating with director Paul Yule, the Rev. Donald Wildmon, who heads the American Family Assocation and devotes himself to railing against blasphemy and obscenity in various media, decided that Damned in the U.S.A. was itself "blasphemous and obscene.
NEWS
March 26, 1990 | BY CAL THOMAS
The First Amendment is getting another workout as state legislatures and Congress consider whether there are, or ought to be, limits on how far so- called "artists" like 2 Live Crew can go in expressing themselves for fun and profit. Can they, in fact, be "As Nasty as They Wanna Be," as the group's top-selling song is titled? So far, those who claim the right to say anything, print anything, record, film, paint or sculpt anything, are demanding an absolute right to be free of any and all restraints.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 29, 2015 | Christine M. Flowers, Daily News Columnist
THERE ARE a lot of things I don't like. Jell-O molds with miniature marshmallows trapped inside the viscous goo. The smell of sweat on the subway. Subways. Sequels (except for "The Godfather II. ") Mosquitoes, malaria, musk, Massachusetts and pretty much everything else that begins with an "m. " We're not talking hatred here, just low grade aversion. Let's call this "dislike speech. " I reserve actual, visceral hatred for only a few things. I hate the people who persecute my asylum clients.
NEWS
August 12, 2012 | Reviewed by Brendan Rastetter
Alif the Unseen By G. Willow Wilson Grove Press. 440 pp. $25   In Alif the Unseen , G. Willow Wilson, author of the Islamic self-discovery memoir The Butterfly Mosque , weaves the tale of a young Arab Indian hacker who goes by the handle Alif , the first letter of the Arabic alphabet. It's also a celebration of the place of women in Arab culture, and a highly accessible examination of the issues involved in the uprisings of the Arab Spring. Wilson tells Alif's story from the perspective of a jinn narrator.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 2012 | Howard Gensler
The cheesy sex novel has long been a staple of literature, and it's always a problem when staples are taken away. But public libraries in several states are pulling the racy romance trilogy Fifty Shades of Grey from shelves or deciding not to order the best-seller at all, saying it's too steamy or too poorly written. Like there are no poorly written books in libraries. "When a book is removed from the shelf, folks who can't afford a Nook or a Kindle, the book is no longer available to them," said Deborah Caldwell Stone, of the American Library Association's office for intellectual freedom.
NEWS
March 4, 2012 | By Glenn Garvin
Chalk up another victory for the greeting-card cartel: Valentine's Day now goes on for weeks, months, even decades - at least when it comes to the American left and the Castro brothers. The latest love letter to Havana comes from Peter Phillips, a sociologist at California's Sonoma State University, where he runs an outfit called Project Censored. It is the conceit of Project Censored that mainstream news media in the United States and other liberal democracies ruthlessly suppress real news in order to protect the world's corporate ruling order.
BUSINESS
February 7, 2012 | By Katy Daigle, Associated Press
NEW DELHI - Google India has removed web pages deemed offensive to Indian political and religious leaders to comply with a court case that has raised censorship fears in the world's largest democracy, media reported Monday. The action follows weeks of intense government pressure for 22 Internet giants to remove photographs, videos or text considered "anti-religious" or "antisocial. " A New Delhi court gave Facebook, Google, YouTube and Blogspot and the other sites two weeks to present further plans for policing their networks, according to the Press Trust of India.
NEWS
January 29, 2012 | By David Crary, Associated Press
NEW YORK - Twitter, a tool of choice for dissidents and activists around the world, found itself the target of global outrage Friday after releasing plans to allow country-specific censorship of tweets that might break local laws. It was a stunning role reversal for a youthful company that prides itself in promoting unfettered expression, 140 characters at a time. Twitter insisted its commitment to free speech remains firm, and sought to explain the nuances of its policy, while critics - in a barrage of tweets - proposed a Twitter boycott and demanded that the censorship initiative be scrapped.
NEWS
January 24, 2012
By Cullen Murphy Inside the gates of the Vatican, just south of St. Peter's Basilica, stands a Renaissance palazzo that was once the headquarters of the Inquisition. It's still the repository of Inquisition archives dating back nearly 500 years. The archives have been open to researchers since 1998, and I visited them on several occasions while working on a book. One day, among the stacks, I came across two polished wooden boxes resembling drawers from an old library card catalog, with hinged tops.
NEWS
January 18, 2012 | BY BURTON CAINE
ORAL ARGUMENT last week in the Supreme Court in FCC v. Fox Television Stations questioned whether "fleeting expletives" on TV are protected speech under the First Amendment. The Federal Communications Commission seeks to punish Fox TV for a live broadcast of an excited award winner uttering the "F" word to express her joy. The Appeals Court held that such censorship violates the First Amendment. Several justices wanted to protect children from "indecency," which has no definition, and on that score alone they would violate the First Amendment.
NEWS
July 21, 2011
AFTER a distinguished legal career, Michael Seidman may not relish my calling him the man who made Philadelphia safe for pornography, but it's mostly true. The why is simple. "I was not a censor," says the 69-year-old Seidman. "I was not going to shut a movie down. " Same thing for the adult-book stores that littered seamier parts of Center City in the early '70s, when he was chief of D.A. Arlen Specter's obscenity unit. Although Seidman was a prosecutor, he saw himself also as a defender - of the First Amendment.
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