FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
June 20, 1991 | By Cynthia J. McGroarty, Special to The Inquirer
If you like trees and you can count, you qualify to take part in Lansdowne's second tree census. "You don't have to have any previous tree knowledge to come," said Kathryn Terzi, a horticulturist who coordinated the first tree census last fall. The census, sponsored by the U.S. Forest Service, is a continuing tally designed to count the types and sizes of trees that line the streets of the borough. Begun in October, the count has identified about half of the trees that need to be recorded, Terzi said.
NEWS
September 29, 1989 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Barbara Everitt Bryant, who was a vice president of the Republican Party's top polling company, has been nominated to be the first female director of the U.S. Census Bureau. The nomination was announced on Wednesday by President Bush. Bryant, 63, was a senior vice president of Market Opinion Research in Detroit. Bryant, whose appointment requires congressional approval, would join the bureau as it gears up for the 1990 census. Next year, the census' bicentennial year, the bureau will employ more than 400,000 people to help count the estimated 250 million people in the nation.
NEWS
March 25, 1990 | By David T. Shaw, Special to The Inquirer
The East Caln Board of Supervisors is asking that residents in the township stand up and be counted. At a meeting Wednesday, the board asked that all households fill out and return the 1990 U.S. census questionnaire by the April 1 deadline to ensure that residents of East Caln benefit from an accurate population count in the township. "We have two revenues that are allocated by the state, and if they don't get a good count, we could be shortchanged for the next 10 years," said Township Manager Edwin R. Hill.
NEWS
March 21, 2001
Minority population is now 55 percent in Philly. In another decade, white and black middle-class people will have left and there will be no one to pay taxes. Then the population will be 90 percent Hispanic and African-American, with the other 10 percent seniors and homeless. Where is the taxpayer? Shake hands, Philly, with Detroit, Camden and Newark. JERRY FOGLIA, Philadelphia
NEWS
July 12, 1987 | By Michael D. Schaffer, Inquirer Staff Writer
The delegates to the Federal Convention found still another issue to disagree on yesterday - how to count the population of the United States. The dispute set North and South squarely at odds and produced a spirited debate. Southern delegates argued that a periodic census was necessary to assure that the allocation of representatives in the new national legislature, which will be based on population, remained fair. The majority of Americans now live in the North, but a day may come when that will no longer be true, the Southerners declared.
NEWS
October 20, 1988 | By Suzanne Gordon, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Haverford School District is looking for students it may not know about. The school district is sending out 17,000 letters to all township residents as the first step in a comprehensive census of school-age children who live in the township to predict future enrollment in the district. Each residence will receive a census packet including a form seeking the names of occupants from birth through 21 years, a letter of explanation and a stamped, addressed envelope for returning the information.
NEWS
March 15, 2010 | By REGINA MEDINA, medinar@phillynews.com 215-854-5985
Mayor Nutter found himself acting as a "preacher without a license" yesterday, meeting congregants at five churches to explain the importance of the 2010 census. He topped off his day's outreach to constituents by attending the St. Patrick's Day Parade, although it's unclear whether he waded into the census agenda there. When the mayor addressed members of the Tindley Temple United Methodist Church, on Broad Street near Catharine, he explained how the city had received a failing grade (56 percent participation)
NEWS
November 3, 2010
COUNTING prisoners as living in areas that aren't their home residence is illegal, according to the state Constitution. What comes out of the census? Federal dollars for education, health care, better neighborhoods and more feasible re-entry programs. Is it a coincidence that the prisoners counted are mostly African-American and from the Philadelphia area? Legally, prisoners are to be counted in the county of their last registration. Out of the 51,000 inmates in state prisons in Pennsylvania, close to half (22,450)
NEWS
May 19, 2012 | By Jennifer Lin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In an attempt to get a more complete picture of homelessness in Philadelphia, more than 50 volunteers fanned out to all corners of the city Wednesday night and counted 583 people living on the streets. Usually, the city only includes Center City, Philadelphia International Airport, and a few select neighborhoods in its quarterly count of unsheltered homeless people. But this time, more people were enlisted to reach more areas of the city. "We moved into every zip code," said Debbie Plotnick, an advocate for the Mental Health Association for Southeastern Pennsylvania.
NEWS
April 14, 1989 | By Reginald Stuart, Daily News Staff Writer
This time next year, the great American head count officially known as the census will begin, packing with it a load of bad news for America's big cities in the Northeast and Midwest. Philadelphia is not likely to be spared. First, there will be official confirmation that the population of the nation's older big cities continued to decline in the 1980s - as it did during the previous three decades - while population in the Sun Belt, especially Florida, Georgia, Texas and California, continued to grow.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
April 22, 2016 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Staff Writer
Evelyn Houser, a North Philadelphia grandmother, didn't live to see the end of what she started six years ago. Houser, who died in September, was a lead plaintiff in the landmark $15 million settlement of a class-action suit this week that may help hundreds of thousands of people with criminal records get jobs. "My mom was always a determined person," said her son, Cephas Houser. "She would dig, dig, and dig, until she found something that she could fight. " The U.S. Commerce Department agreed Tuesday to pay $15 million to settle the lawsuit, which involves an estimated 450,000 African Americans and Latinos who may have been passed over for jobs because of the Census Bureau's background-check recruiting practices.
NEWS
September 18, 2015 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Nearly nine million more Americans joined the ranks of those with health insurance last year, the U.S. Census reported Wednesday in the most detailed look at coverage since the main provisions of the Affordable Care Act kicked in. In 2014, 33 million Americans - 10.4 percent, a nearly 3-point drop - were uninsured, down from 41.8 million in 2013, according to the bureau. While other reports have shown a similar decline in the number of uninsured Americans - and include enrollment figures for 2015 not included in Wednesday's release - the census data are considered the gold standard.
NEWS
September 18, 2015 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia remained the poorest of America's 10 largest cities in 2014, with more than one quarter of its residents - 26 percent - living below the poverty line. At the same time, Camden recorded a seemingly significant drop in poverty in 2014 from 42.6 percent to 36.5 percent - a change experts had a hard time explaining. Both findings were mined from the massive data trove known as the American Community Survey 1-Year Estimate, a product of the U.S. Census Bureau, set to officially be released Thursday.
NEWS
April 6, 2015 | By Michaelle Bond and Caitlin McCabe, Inquirer Staff Writers
For Marjie Versagli, owner of Malvern Flowers & Gifts, this used to be peak season - prom corsages, Mother's Day bouquets. But that's changed. Now, she's busier year-round. About 20 miles away, the Lower Merion School District is in a building frenzy, adding a dozen classrooms and repurposing gymnasiums and other spaces to accommodate its largest enrollment increase in nearly 40 years. The blooming flower business and the Lower Merion crowding are symptomatic of the region's shifting demographics.
NEWS
December 16, 2014 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
  As the government looks ahead to the 2020 census, some civic leaders are seeking changes they say will paint a more vivid picture of an increasingly diverse United States. "Race and Ethnicity in the 2020 Census: Improving Data to Capture a Multiethnic America," a report released last month by the Leadership Conference Education Fund, a coalition of 200 civil rights groups, promotes a series of changes in how the data on race and ethnicity are gathered by the census and its companion American Community Survey.
NEWS
December 8, 2014 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Illustrating the gap between wealth and poverty in the area, new census data shows that in Philadelphia's impoverished Fairhill section, residents have median household incomes of $14,185 a year - 1/12 that of the richest region in the area, Chester County's Birmingham Township. The median household income in Birmingham, a bedroom community of financiers, lawyers, and other professionals 32 miles west of Center City, is $171,689, according to estimates compiled between 2009 and 2013 in the newly released American Community Survey from the Census Bureau.
REAL_ESTATE
October 27, 2014 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
To which socioeconomic class do you belong? According to a report presented in Los Angeles last month to the CityLab Conference of Mayors and City Leaders, if you live, for instance, in Manayunk, Society Hill, Wynnefield or Fox Chase, you probably are a member of the "creative class. " Members of this "knowledge-based" class comprise more than 75 percent to 88 percent of the population of these and other neighborhoods within the city limits, the majority in and around Center City.
NEWS
September 19, 2014
THE U.S. CENSUS released figures this week that show that the national poverty rate has decreased for the first time since 2006. Don't rush to plan a victory parade, though. The percentage of people in poverty has dropped slightly, but the implications are more mathematical than practical: Median household income has remained the same, and the number of those in poverty in 2013 - 45.3 million - is about the same as the year before. And worse news: The percentage of people living below the poverty level in the Philadelphia metro area rose slightly from 2010 to 2013, from 12.7 percent to 13.5 percent; poverty rates in the city fell slightly.
NEWS
March 28, 2014
A story Thursday about population growth in Philadelphia incorrectly gave the latest estimate of the city's population. The city had 1,553,165 residents as of 2013, according to the census.
NEWS
March 28, 2014 | By Maria Panaritis and John Duchneskie, Inquirer Staff Writers
  PHILADELPHIA More people moved out of the city last year than moved in - and at a rate higher than in recent years, according to new Census data released Thursday. This signals a softening in a trend of population increases after decades of decline. The city's population rose by 4,518 in 2013 to 1,553,165 residents - lower than the 10,150-person increase in 2012 and the 12,491-person increase in 2011, according to Census estimates. Why the slowdown? It appears that a higher number of people left the city to live elsewhere than in prior years, dragging down an otherwise net increase in births and the number of new immigrants.
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