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NEWS
February 20, 2008 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Snow began falling as afternoon slid into evening. With the lights of Center City twinkling around and below her, Jane Miles stood by the vast expanse of windows that line one side of her new 27th-floor condominium in Symphony House, watching. "The snowflakes look so big up here," she said, more than a little awe in her voice. "With all the cars whizzing by in the streets below, it's like being in another world. " A world high above Philadelphia that, even a few years ago, Miles and her husband would have been very exclusive residents of. But as condo towers grow more commonplace in the city, taller, well-heeled buyers are choosing to feather their nests in the clouds - or as close as several hundred feet above street level can get them.
NEWS
January 16, 2002
MY FIANC? AND I both live in Harrisburg but travel to Philadelphia often because we love the city. What we don't love, however, are the outrageous parking rates. When he attended monthly meetings of the Black Data Processors Association in Center City, it cost him more in parking fees to attend the meetings than it did in gas and tolls to make the 105-mile trip from Harrisburg to Philadelphia. Parking also becomes an issue when we want to visit Delilah's at the Reading Terminal for a nice Saturday lunch.
NEWS
December 11, 2003
YOUR Holiday Shopping Guide was a welcome sight in the Dec. 3 Daily News. But once again, it gave short shrift to Center City, whining about parking while barely mentioning that you can get downtown by trolley, El, rail, bus, foot, bike and ferryboat. Your reporter seeking Apple's new music player stated flatly that department stores "don't sell the iPod. " Just a few pages later, good old Strawbridge's display ad was featuring just that - the new 20 gigabyte iPod, no less.
NEWS
May 21, 2010 | Inquirer Staff Report
A 22-year-old man was shot and killed early today in Center City, police said. The victim, not immediately identified, was shot in the arm about 2:15 a.m. on the 900 block of Filbert Street, police said. He was rushed to Hahnemann University Hospital, where doctors discovered the bullet had traveled into his chest, police said. He died at 4:46 a.m. Investigators are seeking a motive and a suspect. The also are reviewing surveillance videos from the area.
NEWS
February 9, 1986 | By Tom Infield, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the last decade, more than 15 1/2 million people have visited the Liberty Bell in its glass house on Philadelphia's Independence Mall. But Caroline Carol was not among them. Age 72, a native and lifelong resident of Philadelphia, Caroline Carol has never seen the Liberty Bell, considered by many the premier symbol of America's freedom. "I always wanted to," Carol said wistfully the other day. "They used to take you when you were in school, but I never remember seeing it. . . . I guess I was absent that day. " Long a resident of Mayfair in Northeast Philadelphia, she said she felt "a little embarrassed" by the omission.
NEWS
December 27, 1997 | by Ron Avery, Daily News Staff Writer
It was the kind of day when you could roll a bowling ball down the long corridors of City Hall and not disturb a soul. It seemed like most everyone took yesterday off as an added vacation day. The infamously aggressive lawyers of Philadelphia weren't filing suits. The judges abandoned their benches. Center City parking lot attendants sat sunning themselves in half-empty lots and waitresses sat at back tables reading the newspapers. "We normally serve 80 to 100 at lunch - today we had about 15," said bartender Jim Shrader at Tony Clark's restaurant on Broad Street, which caters to executives and other upscale types.
NEWS
September 11, 2000 | By Steven Conn
As a parking garage moves another step closer to being built near Rittenhouse Square, I can only ask: Whither goest thou, Center City? Here's the fundamental question in recent debates on several Center City development projects, from a parking garage on Sansom to the baseball stadium that threatens to eat Chinatown: What kind of place will Center City be? Two trends have emerged in Center City over the last decade or so. On one hand, downtown Philadelphia is attracting more suburban visitors, out-of-town tourists and conventioneers.
NEWS
March 9, 2010 | By James Osborne INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A 115-car cargo train derailed in Center City last night, with five cars leaving the tracks near 23d and Race Streets. Battalion Fire Chief Mike Kane said there were no injuries and there was no evidence of leakage from any of the five cars. The derailed cars did not tip over. Nearby apartment buildings were not evacuated. The derailment occurred about 10 p.m. Fire and hazardous-materials crews were on the scene and waited for a representative from CSX, the operator of the freight train, but departed by 11:30 p.m. Train traffic on the line was shut down.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 20, 2015 | BY VALERIE RUSS, Daily News Staff Writer russv@phillynews.com, 215-854-5987
CITY COUNCILMAN Kenyatta Johnson wants the Bellevue garage at Broad and Locust streets removed from a bill that would create special zoning for six-story, full-motion 3-D digital advertising structures called urban experiential displays. "When this legislation was first proposed, I was open to the idea because the businesses on the Avenue of the Arts supported it as a way to fund improvements and activities on the avenue," the 2nd District councilman told the Daily News in a statement yesterday.
NEWS
March 19, 2015 | Chris Hepp and Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writers
Democratic mayoral candidate Nelson A. Diaz is staking his campaign on city schools. Abolish the School Reform Commission, Diaz says. Establish a local school board and universal prekindergarten. Connect needy students with social services. "I want to be responsible for the school system," Diaz said in an interview Tuesday with the Inquirer Editorial Board. Diaz fleshed out his ideas with a new education policy paper that described a plan for raising an additional $215 million for the Philadelphia School District short-term, and up to $500 million long term.
NEWS
March 16, 2015 | By Jessica Parks, Inquirer Staff Writer
The hundreds of people crawling Center City bars this weekend in green shirts and shamrock hats probably had no idea there was a real Irish dignitary in their midst - Deputy Prime Minister Joan Burton. Burton, who is also the leader of the Labour Party and the Minister for Social Protection, is on a whirlwind St. Patrick's weekend tour of Philadelphia, Boston and Pittsburgh to promote continued economic ties between the United States and Ireland. On Saturday afternoon, she addressed about 200 leaders of the local Irish community at a reception in Center City.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 2015 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
Two hours behind schedule, Beth Heinly finally located a working electrical outlet in the echoing cavern of the Broad Street concourse and settled in, wearing a puffy chef's hat, to cook pasta. The mac-and-cheese giveaway was Heinly's take on site-specific performance art - meant to engage a space that mostly lies vacant, except for occasional skateboarders, scuttling rainy-day commuters, and covert smokers of marijuana. "I wanted to do a really loving thing in a scary place," she said.
FOOD
March 13, 2015 | By Michael Klein, For The Inquirer
Mexican on the corner If early crowds are an indication, Joseph and Theresa Rimmer Scull have hit on the right combination at 22d and Carpenter Streets with a Mexican bar called Los Camaradas (918 S. 22d St., 215-309-3727). After a spell as Divan Turkish Kitchen, the bar had been two short-lived clunkers, SoWe and the Strip Joint, under different management. The Sculls - he was chef at the late Solaris Grille in Chestnut Hill, while she is a former beverage manager at La Calaca Feliz in Fairmount - added sconces and other decorative pieces from Mexico.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 2015 | By Jenny DeHuff
THANK GOD for the Philadelphia Film Society! On Monday, it officially announced the acquisition of the historic Prince Music Theater, on Chestnut Street near Broad. The beloved theater had been shuttered since October, when the theatrical organization that occupied the building - the American Music Theater Festival - failed to find new leadership after its board chairman died. Prince reps tell me that the beleaguered theater had been in a constant state of bankruptcy but was being floated by its board chairman.
NEWS
March 11, 2015 | STU BYKOFSKY, Daily News Columnist
THE MUMMERS Parade broke with tradition and marched the "wrong way" on Broad Street on New Year's Day. The (remaining) fans seemed to like it. The crowds were somewhat larger in Center City (which is what happens when you contract the parade route). As a veteran parade watcher and reviewer, I liked it, even knowing the reversal of direction was born out of necessity. Doing everything the "old" way was turning into a funeral procession for this Philadelphia tradition, one that should be embraced.
BUSINESS
March 11, 2015 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
If shopping malls are really dying - killed by retail apps, next-day delivery, and those giant "fulfillment centers" rising across Pennsylvania - you wouldn't know it. Not the way big investors like Simon Property Group are buying and selling rival shopping malls. On Monday, Simon - the Indianapolis company that owns one of the largest malls in the United States ( King of Prussia ) and the biggest in Philadelphia ( Philadelphia Mills , the former Franklin Mills) - offered $22 billion, or $91 a share, for national mall chain Macerich Co. , of Santa Monica, Calif.
NEWS
March 9, 2015 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
People cheered the man who was 50 years sober, but they stood and screamed wildly for the guy who hadn't had a drink in a day. "That's for you, Mr. One Day," someone yelled at the stunned young man who stood before a group of about 1,500 members of Alcoholics Anonymous gathered at the Cathedral of SS. Peter and Paul on Saturday. They were there to commemorate the 75th anniversary of the founding of the AA's Philadelphia branch. But, more than a few attendees acknowledged, what people were really celebrating was their still being on the planet after the pain and wreckage the bottle had delivered.
NEWS
March 8, 2015 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
Following the 2013 Center City building collapse that killed six people and injured 13, committees tasked by City Council and the Nutter administration to look into how to reform the Department of Licenses and Inspections concluded that the regulatory agency was underfunded. The department is budgeted at $28.8 million and 353 positions, 20 of which are unfilled. On Thursday, Mayor Nutter responded by calling for an extra $10.8 million for L&I, spread over three years. The first $5.5 million, to be allocated in 2016, would go toward hiring 43 employees, most of them building inspectors, and for new technology.
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