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NEWS
June 18, 2015 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
To cope with the unprecedented crowds anticipated for Pope Francis' visit in September, SEPTA plans to double its rail and subway capacity, limit train stops, and carry only Regional Rail passengers who purchased special passes in advance. Officials of SEPTA, Amtrak, PATCO, and other agencies joined Mayor Nutter at City Hall on Tuesday to outline transportation plans for the papal visit and the World Meeting of Families. As many as two million people are expected to jam the Benjamin Franklin Parkway to see the pope at a Saturday festival and again at a Sunday Mass on Sept.
NEWS
February 20, 2008 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Snow began falling as afternoon slid into evening. With the lights of Center City twinkling around and below her, Jane Miles stood by the vast expanse of windows that line one side of her new 27th-floor condominium in Symphony House, watching. "The snowflakes look so big up here," she said, more than a little awe in her voice. "With all the cars whizzing by in the streets below, it's like being in another world. " A world high above Philadelphia that, even a few years ago, Miles and her husband would have been very exclusive residents of. But as condo towers grow more commonplace in the city, taller, well-heeled buyers are choosing to feather their nests in the clouds - or as close as several hundred feet above street level can get them.
NEWS
January 16, 2002
MY FIANC? AND I both live in Harrisburg but travel to Philadelphia often because we love the city. What we don't love, however, are the outrageous parking rates. When he attended monthly meetings of the Black Data Processors Association in Center City, it cost him more in parking fees to attend the meetings than it did in gas and tolls to make the 105-mile trip from Harrisburg to Philadelphia. Parking also becomes an issue when we want to visit Delilah's at the Reading Terminal for a nice Saturday lunch.
NEWS
December 11, 2003
YOUR Holiday Shopping Guide was a welcome sight in the Dec. 3 Daily News. But once again, it gave short shrift to Center City, whining about parking while barely mentioning that you can get downtown by trolley, El, rail, bus, foot, bike and ferryboat. Your reporter seeking Apple's new music player stated flatly that department stores "don't sell the iPod. " Just a few pages later, good old Strawbridge's display ad was featuring just that - the new 20 gigabyte iPod, no less.
NEWS
May 21, 2010 | Inquirer Staff Report
A 22-year-old man was shot and killed early today in Center City, police said. The victim, not immediately identified, was shot in the arm about 2:15 a.m. on the 900 block of Filbert Street, police said. He was rushed to Hahnemann University Hospital, where doctors discovered the bullet had traveled into his chest, police said. He died at 4:46 a.m. Investigators are seeking a motive and a suspect. The also are reviewing surveillance videos from the area.
NEWS
February 9, 1986 | By Tom Infield, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the last decade, more than 15 1/2 million people have visited the Liberty Bell in its glass house on Philadelphia's Independence Mall. But Caroline Carol was not among them. Age 72, a native and lifelong resident of Philadelphia, Caroline Carol has never seen the Liberty Bell, considered by many the premier symbol of America's freedom. "I always wanted to," Carol said wistfully the other day. "They used to take you when you were in school, but I never remember seeing it. . . . I guess I was absent that day. " Long a resident of Mayfair in Northeast Philadelphia, she said she felt "a little embarrassed" by the omission.
NEWS
March 1, 1996 | BY JIM BELEY
As I speak to fellow business managers and owners in Center City, I detect concern over recent economic reports. It seems that, in this paper and elsewhere, a picture of gloom and doom portrays the region's consumer spending. We hear reports of mall shop owners decrying lack of both traffic and spending. We see overstocked department stores slashing to their deepest discounts in modern memory. This concerns all of us in business. But many of us are just as deeply concerned that the picture is being painted with too broad a brush.
NEWS
December 27, 1997 | by Ron Avery, Daily News Staff Writer
It was the kind of day when you could roll a bowling ball down the long corridors of City Hall and not disturb a soul. It seemed like most everyone took yesterday off as an added vacation day. The infamously aggressive lawyers of Philadelphia weren't filing suits. The judges abandoned their benches. Center City parking lot attendants sat sunning themselves in half-empty lots and waitresses sat at back tables reading the newspapers. "We normally serve 80 to 100 at lunch - today we had about 15," said bartender Jim Shrader at Tony Clark's restaurant on Broad Street, which caters to executives and other upscale types.
NEWS
September 11, 2000 | By Steven Conn
As a parking garage moves another step closer to being built near Rittenhouse Square, I can only ask: Whither goest thou, Center City? Here's the fundamental question in recent debates on several Center City development projects, from a parking garage on Sansom to the baseball stadium that threatens to eat Chinatown: What kind of place will Center City be? Two trends have emerged in Center City over the last decade or so. On one hand, downtown Philadelphia is attracting more suburban visitors, out-of-town tourists and conventioneers.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 28, 2015 | By Madeline R. Conway, Inquirer Staff Writer
Outfitted with high ceilings, circles of furniture, and stacks of appliances and construction material, Habitat for Humanity's newest store was already a bustling place moments after Friday's grand opening. In the words of Corinne O'Connell, associate executive director of Habitat Philadelphia, the 17,000-square-foot store, housed in a nondescript, one-story building on Washington Avenue, is "Five Below meets Home Depot. " "We have everything but the clothes you wear and the mattress you sleep on," she said.
BUSINESS
June 24, 2015 | By Jacob Adelman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Tutor Perini Corp.'s Philadelphia office has been awarded a $239 million contract to build a Center City hotel that will be split between two Starwood Hotels & Resorts Worldwide brands. In a release Monday, the Los Angeles-based construction company said the 51-story hotel tower, which will house W- and Element-branded hotels, should be largely completed by the end of March 2018. jadelman@phillynews.com 215-854-2615 @jacobadelman
NEWS
June 23, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
Given the Philadelphia Parking Authority's apparently ample time for gratuitous enforcement, ride-share crackdowns, and reality television, Jim Kenney's impulse to find more for the agency to do is understandable. The Democratic mayoral nominee, who recently suggested that the authority's ruthless army of meter monitors be mobilized to enforce construction codes and more, isn't the first to wonder whether its shock-and-awe strategy could be applied to matters more pressing than, well, parking.
BUSINESS
June 22, 2015 | By Jacob Adelman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia is in the middle of its biggest hotel-building binge since the late 1990s, as developers rush to accommodate an expected burst of business travelers, tourists, and conventioneers. Eight hotel projects now in the planning stage or under construction in and around Center City would bump up the number of rooms by more than 2,000, or almost 20 percent, from current levels - the sharpest increase since the surge that surrounded the Republican National Convention in 2000. The new hotels range from a Four Seasons atop the Comcast Innovation and Technology Center, which when completed will be one of the country's tallest buildings, to boutique projects such as the planned transformation of a historic court building just off Benjamin Franklin Parkway into a Kimpton Hotel.
REAL_ESTATE
June 21, 2015 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Little things mean a lot, especially to a real estate agent who is trying to sell one listing among many. Two things that may seem little but are really not so trifling when it comes to selling a house: keeping it neat for appointments, and washing the windows. "The marketplace is monopolized by first-time buyers as well as empty-nesters," said Mark Wade, who sells houses in Center City for Berkshire Hathaway Home Services Fox & Roach Realtors. "Both sets of buyers have one thing in common," Wade said.
NEWS
June 21, 2015 | By Caroline Simon, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Boy Scouts Cradle of Liberty Council, which two years ago vacated its headquarters in Center City as part of a settlement of a dispute with the city over its policy toward gay people, announced Friday that it opposes discrimination based on sexual orientation. The policy change means gays can serve as scoutmasters, be scouts, or work for Cradle of Liberty, which represents 15,000 scouts in Delaware and Montgomery Counties and Philadelphia. Jim Papada, Cradle of Liberty board president, said in a statement that the move was "the right thing to do" and that the group valued diversity.
FOOD
June 19, 2015 | By Michael Klein, For The Inquirer
Bryn & Dane's expands Not too long ago, a guy named Bryn was sharing a room with a guy named Dane. Bryn worked late into the night on his idea for a healthy fast-food restaurant. Dane just wanted a good night's sleep. They're brothers; Bryn is now 30 and Dane is 14. Four years ago, Bryn Davis opened a small smoothie shop that morphed into a well-trafficked cafe in Horsham, a catering arm, and a stand inside the Ambler YMCA. Menu is based on wraps, salads, and smoothies.
NEWS
June 18, 2015 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
To cope with the unprecedented crowds anticipated for Pope Francis' visit in September, SEPTA plans to double its rail and subway capacity, limit train stops, and carry only Regional Rail passengers who purchased special passes in advance. Officials of SEPTA, Amtrak, PATCO, and other agencies joined Mayor Nutter at City Hall on Tuesday to outline transportation plans for the papal visit and the World Meeting of Families. As many as two million people are expected to jam the Benjamin Franklin Parkway to see the pope at a Saturday festival and again at a Sunday Mass on Sept.
REAL_ESTATE
June 15, 2015 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
At last count, there were a zillion Internet sites catering to apartment dwellers, of which Apartment List's is neither the greatest nor the least. All these sites conduct surveys. Most are silly, and so forgettable that I cannot even offer you an example. I'm not going to forget the latest survey at Apartmentlist.com, however, because of how Philadelphia appears to be perceived by renters here: 18,000 were surveyed nationally; a local number was not provided. The bottom line: Renters gave Philadelphia a C-minus for city satisfaction, ranking it 80th of 100 cities surveyed.
NEWS
June 14, 2015 | By Maria Panaritis, Inquirer Staff Writer
Despite community opposition, the Philadelphia Historical Commission on Friday approved portions of a developer's plans to reinvent a string of Center City properties, including what remains of the former Boyd Theater. The 7-3 vote gave Pearl Properties partial permission to move forward with transforming a chunk of the 1900 block of Chestnut Street. The vote did not address developer Jim Pearlstein's desire to build a 341-foot-tall apartment tower on what had been the 1920s-era movie palace.
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