CollectionsCenter City
IN THE NEWS

Center City

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
February 20, 2008 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Snow began falling as afternoon slid into evening. With the lights of Center City twinkling around and below her, Jane Miles stood by the vast expanse of windows that line one side of her new 27th-floor condominium in Symphony House, watching. "The snowflakes look so big up here," she said, more than a little awe in her voice. "With all the cars whizzing by in the streets below, it's like being in another world. " A world high above Philadelphia that, even a few years ago, Miles and her husband would have been very exclusive residents of. But as condo towers grow more commonplace in the city, taller, well-heeled buyers are choosing to feather their nests in the clouds - or as close as several hundred feet above street level can get them.
NEWS
November 27, 2014 | By Mike Newall and Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writers
The traumatized girl in the Special Victims Unit in March described a sex-trafficking underworld that stretched from Germantown to Georgia. The teenager said her captors had threatened to kill her if she ran from their home on a modest Northwest Philadelphia block. She said they had forced her, age 14, to have sex with as many as seven men a day. She didn't know most of the men's names - but she could name one for certain, a Center City lawyer she knew as "Meehan. " The girl remembered where he worked: "a big building near City Hall.
BUSINESS
January 10, 2015 | By Maria Panaritis, Inquirer Staff Writer
For years, landlords tried to coax Target to open one of its big-box stores in the heart of Philadelphia. Each time they failed, daunted by the difficulty of plunking a store the size of two football fields into a packed downtown. That chase appears to have come to an end, with a much smaller version called Target Express now looking to make a splash at multiple locations in the hottest pockets of redevelopment near Philadelphia's core. Target Corp. is hunting for lease deals in Center City and University City to build what could be as many as four of the new stores, which are about one-sixth the size of a suburban Target.
NEWS
January 16, 2002
MY FIANC? AND I both live in Harrisburg but travel to Philadelphia often because we love the city. What we don't love, however, are the outrageous parking rates. When he attended monthly meetings of the Black Data Processors Association in Center City, it cost him more in parking fees to attend the meetings than it did in gas and tolls to make the 105-mile trip from Harrisburg to Philadelphia. Parking also becomes an issue when we want to visit Delilah's at the Reading Terminal for a nice Saturday lunch.
NEWS
December 11, 2003
YOUR Holiday Shopping Guide was a welcome sight in the Dec. 3 Daily News. But once again, it gave short shrift to Center City, whining about parking while barely mentioning that you can get downtown by trolley, El, rail, bus, foot, bike and ferryboat. Your reporter seeking Apple's new music player stated flatly that department stores "don't sell the iPod. " Just a few pages later, good old Strawbridge's display ad was featuring just that - the new 20 gigabyte iPod, no less.
NEWS
May 21, 2010 | Inquirer Staff Report
A 22-year-old man was shot and killed early today in Center City, police said. The victim, not immediately identified, was shot in the arm about 2:15 a.m. on the 900 block of Filbert Street, police said. He was rushed to Hahnemann University Hospital, where doctors discovered the bullet had traveled into his chest, police said. He died at 4:46 a.m. Investigators are seeking a motive and a suspect. The also are reviewing surveillance videos from the area.
NEWS
February 9, 1986 | By Tom Infield, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the last decade, more than 15 1/2 million people have visited the Liberty Bell in its glass house on Philadelphia's Independence Mall. But Caroline Carol was not among them. Age 72, a native and lifelong resident of Philadelphia, Caroline Carol has never seen the Liberty Bell, considered by many the premier symbol of America's freedom. "I always wanted to," Carol said wistfully the other day. "They used to take you when you were in school, but I never remember seeing it. . . . I guess I was absent that day. " Long a resident of Mayfair in Northeast Philadelphia, she said she felt "a little embarrassed" by the omission.
NEWS
March 1, 1996 | BY JIM BELEY
As I speak to fellow business managers and owners in Center City, I detect concern over recent economic reports. It seems that, in this paper and elsewhere, a picture of gloom and doom portrays the region's consumer spending. We hear reports of mall shop owners decrying lack of both traffic and spending. We see overstocked department stores slashing to their deepest discounts in modern memory. This concerns all of us in business. But many of us are just as deeply concerned that the picture is being painted with too broad a brush.
NEWS
December 27, 1997 | by Ron Avery, Daily News Staff Writer
It was the kind of day when you could roll a bowling ball down the long corridors of City Hall and not disturb a soul. It seemed like most everyone took yesterday off as an added vacation day. The infamously aggressive lawyers of Philadelphia weren't filing suits. The judges abandoned their benches. Center City parking lot attendants sat sunning themselves in half-empty lots and waitresses sat at back tables reading the newspapers. "We normally serve 80 to 100 at lunch - today we had about 15," said bartender Jim Shrader at Tony Clark's restaurant on Broad Street, which caters to executives and other upscale types.
NEWS
September 11, 2000 | By Steven Conn
As a parking garage moves another step closer to being built near Rittenhouse Square, I can only ask: Whither goest thou, Center City? Here's the fundamental question in recent debates on several Center City development projects, from a parking garage on Sansom to the baseball stadium that threatens to eat Chinatown: What kind of place will Center City be? Two trends have emerged in Center City over the last decade or so. On one hand, downtown Philadelphia is attracting more suburban visitors, out-of-town tourists and conventioneers.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 19, 2015 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
The grandfather of Philadelphia folk music is retiring from the radio. Ever since he took over Joel Dorn's slot on WHAT-FM in 1962, Gene Shay has been on the air in his hometown with his Sunday night folk-music show. But on Feb. 1, the DJ who grew up Ivan Shaner in Nicetown will close the book on The Folk Show with Gene Shay , which has aired on WXPN (88.5-FM) since 1995. To say Shay is a Philadelphia music-scene institution would be an understatement. The influential DJ, who got his start as an intern at Temple University station WRTI while a student in the 1950s, brought Bob Dylan to town for his first Philadelphia show at the Ethical Society in 1963.
BUSINESS
January 17, 2015 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Higher sales volume and increased prices for single-family homes became more widespread across Philadelphia neighborhoods in the last three months of 2014, according to an analysis of fourth-quarter real estate data obtained from the city recorder of deeds. The analysis by economist Kevin Gillen, senior research fellow at Drexel University's Lindy Institute for Urban Innovation and chief economist at Meyers Research, showed that in the October-December period, average house values increased 0.8 percent citywide over the previous three months.
NEWS
January 17, 2015 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
An 18-year-old Temple University student who may have been taking pictures from an eighth-floor Center City dorm room Thursday evening fell to her death and struck and injured a pedestrian on the sidewalk below, police said. Shortly before 6 p.m., police responded to numerous 911 calls reporting that one or two people may have fallen from a building in the 100 block of South 16th Street, said Chief Inspector Scott Small. They found two women lying next to each other on the sidewalk outside the H&M store at the high-traffic corner of 16th and Chestnut Streets, Small said.
BUSINESS
January 16, 2015 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
A new program aimed at providing legal assistance to vulnerable elderly veterans has been launched by the SeniorLaw Center, a public interest group that focuses on the legal needs of the aged. Karen Buck, the center's executive director, said the program was developed to reach elderly veterans who typically are reluctant to ask for assistance. "We had been getting a number of calls for assistance from senior veterans with really dramatic cases and dramatic issues," she said. "We found there was quite a huge need, but our senior veterans were not reaching out for assistance.
NEWS
January 15, 2015 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Inquirer Staff Writer
Paul Steinke, former general manager of the Reading Terminal Market, announced his bid Tuesday for an at-large City Council seat, calling himself a candidate with a track record of transforming the city for the better. Standing in front of the wide windows of a Center City bar across from the market he oversaw for 13 years, the Democrat said his life's work has been "creating growth and producing results. " "Our city deservedly is an international destination, known for its great history.
NEWS
January 10, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
With a counter and seven booths stuffed into a corner of a parking garage, Little Pete's dimensions live up to its name as much as its compact cofounder and namesake, Peter Koutroubas. Measured, however, by the reaction to reports of its imminent demise, Little Pete's is surprisingly big. After Councilman Kenyatta Johnson introduced legislation last fall to clear the way for a boutique hotel on Little Pete's Center City corner - presaging the all-night diner's doom - the blog Philebrity started a #SaveLittlePetes campaign on Twitter while panicked customers peppered Koutroubas' brother John with questions.
NEWS
January 10, 2015 | Staff Report
Testing is underway for a flashy, high tech video billboard atop the iconic former Lit Bros. department store building in Center City. The testing of the wraparound LED signs rising 14 feet above the building's roofline at the corner of 7th and Market Streets has begun later than a hoped-for New Year's Eve debut. The signs, the first of surely more to come as major redevelopment proposals firm up for the stretch known as Market East, will hopefully help ignite a transformation of the corridor from gray and ghostly castoff to its onetime status as a must-see slice of the big city, officials say. The block side building, now known as the Mellon Independence Center, is actually 33 buildings constructed between 1859 and 1918 and cobbled together in a uniform Renaissance Revival style.
BUSINESS
January 10, 2015 | By Maria Panaritis, Inquirer Staff Writer
For years, landlords tried to coax Target to open one of its big-box stores in the heart of Philadelphia. Each time they failed, daunted by the difficulty of plunking a store the size of two football fields into a packed downtown. That chase appears to have come to an end, with a much smaller version called Target Express now looking to make a splash at multiple locations in the hottest pockets of redevelopment near Philadelphia's core. Target Corp. is hunting for lease deals in Center City and University City to build what could be as many as four of the new stores, which are about one-sixth the size of a suburban Target.
NEWS
January 10, 2015 | By Jessica Parks and Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writers
The bitter arctic chill that produced the region's coldest day since last January was blamed for at least one death Thursday, Philadelphia police said. An unidentified 64-year-old woman was found dead early Thursday in a Southwest Philadelphia house where the inside temperature had dropped to 10 degrees, and the cold evidently contributed to her death, Lt. John Walker of Southwest Detectives said. With temperatures fighting to get out of the teens, homeless-services providers were working hard to protect the region's most vulnerable residents from bone-chilling cold.
NEWS
January 9, 2015
VEGAN restaurants tend to share an origin story: Earnest vegans, cooking food to nourish the heart, soul and planet, share their culinary activism with the public at large. Sometimes it works, sometimes there's more sincerity than cooking aptitude. But in Jenkintown, the new Flora is a novel case: a vegan restaurant started by nonvegans (with a nonvegan chef) on the notion that it's good business. "Yeah, in-between Blue Sage [Vegetarian Grille, in Southampton] and Center City, there weren't a whole lot of vegan dining options," explained Dan Brightcliffe, a co-founder who also doubles as low-key host and waiter for the cozy, 16-seat venue, on Old York Road between Greenwood and West avenues.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|