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NEWS
October 20, 2014 | BY MENSAH M. DEAN, Daily News Staff Writer deanm@phillynews.com, 215-568-8278
A CONTROVERSIAL group of black street preachers who spew hate speech at whites, Asians, gays, women and some blacks they find objectionable, has a right to continue preaching, the state Superior Court has ruled. The Oct. 14 decision affirmed Philadelphia Common Pleas Judge Ellen Ceisler's ruling from July 2013, and is another blow to the Shops at Liberty Place, which sued the preachers. Operating under the name Israelite School of Universal Practical Knowledge, the preachers since 2012 have held semiregular Friday-afternoon demonstrations on the public sidewalk at 16th and Chestnut streets, which is near the main entrance to the Center City retail complex.
NEWS
February 20, 2008 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Snow began falling as afternoon slid into evening. With the lights of Center City twinkling around and below her, Jane Miles stood by the vast expanse of windows that line one side of her new 27th-floor condominium in Symphony House, watching. "The snowflakes look so big up here," she said, more than a little awe in her voice. "With all the cars whizzing by in the streets below, it's like being in another world. " A world high above Philadelphia that, even a few years ago, Miles and her husband would have been very exclusive residents of. But as condo towers grow more commonplace in the city, taller, well-heeled buyers are choosing to feather their nests in the clouds - or as close as several hundred feet above street level can get them.
NEWS
September 6, 2013 | BY LAUREN McCUTCHEON, Daily News Staff Writer mccutch@phillynews.com, 215-854-5991
THAT 6-year-old Davin Schulson can make his own lunch (homemade citrusade, chicken tacos and raspberry-watermelon frozen pops) is no surprise. The eldest son of celeb chef-restaurateur Michael Schulson (Center City's Sampan, Atlantic City's Izakaya and Ardmore's The Saint James) has been cooking at his dad's elbow longer than he can remember. "He was tossing edamame in a pot when he was 18 months old, when we appeared together on 'E! News,' " said his proud papa, also dad to Jordan, 3. Still, that Davin can stand in one place on a stepladder while single-mindedly squeezing fruit, mixing in maple syrup, loading frozen berries into a blender and then slicing - and sautéing - a chicken breast is somewhat of a miracle.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 2014 | BY CHUCK DARROW, Daily News Staff Writer darrowc@phillynews.com, 215-313-3134
THE FUTURE is where we are headed, like it or not. And, generally, it's where we want to be. But sometimes it's nice to turn back the clock and remember how things were, say, between the end of World War II and the emergence of the Beatles. Back then, unlike today, show business was primarily for and by grown-ups. "Youth culture" meant kids playing with dolls or toy trucks. Every big city had at least one room where, late at night, adults could listen to sophisticated music as they ate, drank and smoked cigars and cigarettes.
NEWS
September 29, 2014 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
Let New York gloat about completing the High Line. Philadelphia is about to debut a linear park that might be even more impressive: the Schuylkill Banks Boardwalk. As wonderful as the High Line is, it merely allows people to wend their way through Manhattan a few stories above its bustling streets. When the latest segment of the Schuylkill Banks trail opens to the public Thursday, you'll be able to walk on water, under the glittering gaze of the Center City skyline. The new 15-foot-wide walkway dives into the river at Locust Street, and doesn't crawl back onto dry land until it reaches the South Street Bridge, a joyous journey more than 2,000 feet long.
NEWS
February 14, 2014 | By Laura McCrystal, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Mormon Church plans to build a 32-story apartment tower and a public meetinghouse on a vacant lot next to the Vine Street Expressway, filling in a key piece of the no-man's-land that has long separated Center City and North Philadelphia's rebounding neighborhoods. The private development by the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints calls for 258 apartments, 13 townhouses, and retail shops at 16th and Vine Streets. The meetinghouse will have a chapel, courtyard, multipurpose space, and a center to research genealogy, said Michael Marcheschi, senior real estate manager for the church's national special projects department.
REAL_ESTATE
October 6, 2014 | By Erin Arvedlund, Inquirer Staff Writer
The annual Center City Residents Association open-house tour offers a rare opportunity to peek inside some of Philadelphia's most private homes. But this year's tour, for the first time, highlights the ongoing, historically accurate renovation of a house undergoing preservation - a magnificent Delancey Street mansion. Representatives of John Milner Architects and contractor Cherokee Construction will be on hand to answer questions about the preservation house, said the residents' association co-chair, Kathleen Federico.
NEWS
January 16, 2002
MY FIANC? AND I both live in Harrisburg but travel to Philadelphia often because we love the city. What we don't love, however, are the outrageous parking rates. When he attended monthly meetings of the Black Data Processors Association in Center City, it cost him more in parking fees to attend the meetings than it did in gas and tolls to make the 105-mile trip from Harrisburg to Philadelphia. Parking also becomes an issue when we want to visit Delilah's at the Reading Terminal for a nice Saturday lunch.
NEWS
December 11, 2003
YOUR Holiday Shopping Guide was a welcome sight in the Dec. 3 Daily News. But once again, it gave short shrift to Center City, whining about parking while barely mentioning that you can get downtown by trolley, El, rail, bus, foot, bike and ferryboat. Your reporter seeking Apple's new music player stated flatly that department stores "don't sell the iPod. " Just a few pages later, good old Strawbridge's display ad was featuring just that - the new 20 gigabyte iPod, no less.
NEWS
May 21, 2010 | Inquirer Staff Report
A 22-year-old man was shot and killed early today in Center City, police said. The victim, not immediately identified, was shot in the arm about 2:15 a.m. on the 900 block of Filbert Street, police said. He was rushed to Hahnemann University Hospital, where doctors discovered the bullet had traveled into his chest, police said. He died at 4:46 a.m. Investigators are seeking a motive and a suspect. The also are reviewing surveillance videos from the area.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 20, 2014 | BY MENSAH M. DEAN, Daily News Staff Writer deanm@phillynews.com, 215-568-8278
A CONTROVERSIAL group of black street preachers who spew hate speech at whites, Asians, gays, women and some blacks they find objectionable, has a right to continue preaching, the state Superior Court has ruled. The Oct. 14 decision affirmed Philadelphia Common Pleas Judge Ellen Ceisler's ruling from July 2013, and is another blow to the Shops at Liberty Place, which sued the preachers. Operating under the name Israelite School of Universal Practical Knowledge, the preachers since 2012 have held semiregular Friday-afternoon demonstrations on the public sidewalk at 16th and Chestnut streets, which is near the main entrance to the Center City retail complex.
NEWS
October 20, 2014 | By Maria Panaritis, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia, your moment has arrived. Billionaire-deep wallets and millennial minds are descending on the city Sunday for the start to the first Forbes Under 30 Summit, where tycoons and start-up stars will mindmeld with young entrepreneurs in what organizers hope may become an annual East Coast version of the South by Southwest Festival in Texas. The exclusive event kicks off with a concert in Northern Liberties on Sunday featuring Wiz Khalifa and others. It continues through Wednesday with TED-like talks at the Convention Center, tours of budding commercial and tech enterprises across the city, and visits by Forbes honorees to seven schools.
REAL_ESTATE
October 19, 2014 | By Erin Arvedlund, Inquirer Staff Writer
Cara Schneider Bongiorno and her husband, Charles Bongiorno, a physician, are true Philadelphians: They've made the most of their 20-by-12-foot concrete back yard by converting it into a graceful garden and May-through-November party space with seating. Many city residents rely on a concrete pad behind their homes to serve as their "outdoors. " The Bongiornos were determined to bring true green to their space and to decorate it in a way that would be inviting for a barbecue with friends, a glass of wine in the evenings after work, or just a quiet refuge.
NEWS
October 16, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ralph Tekel, 94, of Center City, a retired La Salle University chemistry professor who as a graduate student contributed to the Manhattan Project - albeit without his knowledge - died Wednesday, Oct. 8, of pneumonia at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital. According to his daughter Billie Elias, in 1944 Dr. Tekel was part of a research team led by Dr. Henry Hass at Purdue University called Project 220. The team was asked to prepare Freon-like materials called fluorocarbons, Elias said.
NEWS
October 14, 2014
J OSH GOLDBLUM, 37, of Center City, is founder and CEO of Bluecadet, a digital-design firm that works with museums, universities and nonprofits to create websites, mobile apps and interactive installations. Goldblum, who grew up in Abington, founded Bluecadet in 2007. Recently, the Greater Philadelphia Chamber of Commerce named him its Small Business Person of the Year for 2015. Q: How'd you come up with the idea for Bluecadet? A: I was a technical designer at the Smithsonian American Art Museum, and later I collaborated with other museums and freelanced.
NEWS
October 12, 2014 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ray K. Metzker, 83, widely considered one of the nation's greatest photographers, died Thursday, Oct. 9, after a long illness. A spare and somewhat laconic figure, Mr. Metzker came to Philadelphia in 1962 to teach at the Philadelphia College of Art - now part of the University of the Arts - and fell in love with the shadow-streaked streets of the old city. Known for his black-and-white images of the urban streetscape - a man walking past the Fidelity Bank building, a woman captured by a shaft of sunlight, a sailor in whites stepping into an ominous shadow - Mr. Metzker walked the city decade after decade, finding the remarkable in the ordinary and the powerful in the most fleeting.
BUSINESS
October 11, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
The St. Peter Claver Center for Evangelization in Center City, which has served black Catholics for nearly 30 years, will close at the end of this month, the Archdiocese of Philadelphia announced. The center, housed in the former St. Peter Claver Roman Catholic Church at 12th and Lombard Streets, a historically black parish, was originally slated to close two years ago amid major archdiocesan cutbacks, including the layoff of a quarter of the staff at headquarters. But the archdiocese's Office for Black Catholics, part of the Secretariat for Evangelization, appealed the decision, and the center was given a reprieve because grants from outside the archdiocese were supporting its programs.
NEWS
October 10, 2014 | BY SOLOMON LEACH, Daily News Staff Writer leachs@phillynews.com, 215-854-5903
The head of the American Federation of Teachers met privately with elected officials in Philadelphia yesterday to urge them to call on the school district to return to the bargaining table days after the district unilaterally cancelled the contract with teachers and imposed healthcare benefits changes. Randi Weingarten, AFT president, voiced outrage at the School Reform Commission's bombshell earlier this week, which came after 21 months of negotiations with the local chapter. She assailed it as a last-ditch effort to aid Gov. Corbett's fledgling campaign three weeks before the gubernatorial election.
NEWS
October 9, 2014 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Philadelphia loan broker responsible for lining up funding for some of Center City's most high-profile recent developments was sentenced Tuesday to 16 years in prison for his role in a $26 million fraud that bilked nearly 2,000 hopeful entrepreneurs out of money they gave him to secure small-business financing. As part of an agreement with prosecutors, Matthew McManus, a former co-owner of Remington Financial Group, agreed to pay back $17.7 million to his victims. He said Tuesday that he was "truly and painstakingly sorry" for his crimes - an admission that left U.S. District Judge William H. Yohn Jr. puzzled.
BUSINESS
October 9, 2014 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Biddle Building at 1217 Sansom St., investor Leonard Thylan 's former jewelry factory, was supposed to be part of a boutique hotel that never got built. Instead, it has been renovated and won new life as a home to tech and creative companies. Enterprise-mobility software-maker CloudMine , once a tenant at The Inquirer's digital incubator, is taking a floor at the Biddle. Branding agency At Media is taking half of another floor. So is ad and marketing agency Ark Ideas , and several more firms are in talks, say the brokers at the PernaFrederick real estate agency, which represents some of the new-era firms where workers seem to care more about bike lockups than car garages.
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