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NEWS
April 11, 2014 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Columnist
IF CHRISTINA SANKEY had been an angel-faced toddler when she went missing, we might know by now how she wound up dead, half-naked and alone, between two parked cars in West Philly on a frigid winter morning. The city would've been galvanized by her death. Government officials would've promised to find out how she met her tragic end. Someone would've created a sidewalk memorial, and others would've led prayer vigils to honor the life that was lost. But Christina, 37, had the mentality of a 2-year-old, but not the physique.
NEWS
April 14, 2014 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
OLD CITY The Shirt Corner and the Suit Corner buildings had been through a lot during their nearly 200 years at Third and Market Streets, but somehow they always found a way to adapt. Only two months ago, the two were still inseparable companions, still standing eyeball-to-eyeball, still trying to outdo each other with their blazing, red-white-and-blue facade graphics. Today, the Suit Corner, on the southwest corner, is a smoldering ruin, its roof gone, its timbers charred black from Wednesday's fire.
NEWS
March 9, 2014 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA A 29-year-old woman with autism who disappeared Thursday during a visit to the Macy's store in Center City was found dead Friday morning between two parked cars in West Philadelphia, police said. The cause of Christina Sankey's death is under investigation. Sankey, who was unable to speak, was with a caregiver around 2:30 p.m. at Macy's when she wandered off, police said. She was last seen on surveillance video getting on a down escalator on the second floor. She was reported missing.
NEWS
April 11, 2014 | BY DAVID GAMBACORTA, Daily News Staff Writer gambacd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5994
THE MEMORY is as clear as day in Rabbi Arthur Waskow's mind. It was sometime in 2010, and he was at a beach, watching his young granddaughter frolic with seagulls along the edge of the Atlantic Ocean. His mind drifted to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, and he wondered what kind of world his granddaughter would inherit, what kind of environmental disasters she'd witness. Waskow said that haunting thought inspired him to be a part of a multifaith crowd that gathered in Center City yesterday to protest the dangers of trains that carry crude oil through Philadelphia.
NEWS
February 20, 2008 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Snow began falling as afternoon slid into evening. With the lights of Center City twinkling around and below her, Jane Miles stood by the vast expanse of windows that line one side of her new 27th-floor condominium in Symphony House, watching. "The snowflakes look so big up here," she said, more than a little awe in her voice. "With all the cars whizzing by in the streets below, it's like being in another world. " A world high above Philadelphia that, even a few years ago, Miles and her husband would have been very exclusive residents of. But as condo towers grow more commonplace in the city, taller, well-heeled buyers are choosing to feather their nests in the clouds - or as close as several hundred feet above street level can get them.
NEWS
February 14, 2014 | By Laura McCrystal, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Mormon Church plans to build a 32-story apartment tower and a public meetinghouse on a vacant lot next to the Vine Street Expressway, filling in a key piece of the no-man's-land that has long separated Center City and North Philadelphia's rebounding neighborhoods. The private development by the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints calls for 258 apartments, 13 townhouses, and retail shops at 16th and Vine Streets. The meetinghouse will have a chapel, courtyard, multipurpose space, and a center to research genealogy, said Michael Marcheschi, senior real estate manager for the church's national special projects department.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 2014 | By Shaun Brady, For The Inquirer
In its first two years, the story of the Center City Jazz Festival tended to focus on its precarious financial situation. Less than two months before the inaugural event in 2012, trombonist and founder Ernest Stuart still had his fingers crossed that his Kickstarter campaign would make his vision for the festival a reality. Last year, late funding came through that allowed a repeat performance and pianist Orrin Evans' Peco-sponsored headlining concert at UArts' Arts Bank Theater.
NEWS
April 12, 2014 | By Jessica Parks, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA Former President Bill Clinton delivered a rousing speech Thursday to promote Marjorie Margolies' congressional campaign, assuring the audience that "I would be here even if her son weren't my son-in-law. " In a 25-minute stump speech at the Radisson Blu Warwick Hotel in Center City, Clinton praised Margolies not only for casting the deciding vote on his spending plan during her stint in Congress, but also for her work on gun control, student loans, and women's issues at home and abroad.
NEWS
January 16, 2002
MY FIANC? AND I both live in Harrisburg but travel to Philadelphia often because we love the city. What we don't love, however, are the outrageous parking rates. When he attended monthly meetings of the Black Data Processors Association in Center City, it cost him more in parking fees to attend the meetings than it did in gas and tolls to make the 105-mile trip from Harrisburg to Philadelphia. Parking also becomes an issue when we want to visit Delilah's at the Reading Terminal for a nice Saturday lunch.
NEWS
December 11, 2003
YOUR Holiday Shopping Guide was a welcome sight in the Dec. 3 Daily News. But once again, it gave short shrift to Center City, whining about parking while barely mentioning that you can get downtown by trolley, El, rail, bus, foot, bike and ferryboat. Your reporter seeking Apple's new music player stated flatly that department stores "don't sell the iPod. " Just a few pages later, good old Strawbridge's display ad was featuring just that - the new 20 gigabyte iPod, no less.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 18, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
William J. Brady Jr., 91, of Chestnut Hill, a Philadelphia Municipal Court judge for three decades, died Monday, April 7, of kidney failure at Good Shepherd Penn Partners. Judge Brady was the son of William John Brady, also a lawyer and judge in Philadelphia. Between the judge and his father, there was a William J. Brady working in Center City for the better part of a century before the judge's health failed in December 2013, said his son, William J. III, a venture capitalist for the technology industry.
NEWS
April 18, 2014 | BY JONATHAN TAKIFF, Daily News Staff Writer takiffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5960
WASN'T Philadelphia's bad-joke reputation as a town that "rolled up the sidewalks after dark" put to bed decades ago? Still, tomorrow's multivenue Center City Jazz Festival kicks into gear at the unhip hour of 1 p.m. And the fest's saxophone-tootin' headliners - world-music flavored freewheeler Steve Coleman and mainstream marvel Tim Warfield Jr. - hit their respective stages 'round 6 p.m., not midnight! "Last year's [second annual] CCJ festival was mostly in the daytime, and this year we've compacted it all," festival founder Ernest Stuart shared.
NEWS
April 17, 2014 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA When Dien Binh Chau, a naturalized citizen, went to his polling place in South Philadelphia recently, he needed help understanding the ballot. With no municipal interpreter present, poll workers turned to a stranger on the street, who just happened to speak Vietnamese. When Wei Shong Lui showed up at a Chinatown church to cast a ballot, his name wasn't on the rolls. Rather than tell him his correct polling place, workers turned him away. Chau and Lui are among a dozen recent examples compiled by voting-rights advocates who say about 57 percent of foreign-born Asian Americans in Philadelphia have limited proficiency in English and are entitled to special assistance that many are not receiving.
NEWS
April 17, 2014
W ITH regards to Ronnie Polaneczky's story on Christina Sankey, I was saddened and angered to hear that neither our government agencies nor Casmir Care Services is investigating this case. Why? We are supposed to protect and care for the handicapped. What is wrong with everyone? Doesn't anyone care about people? Why is Christina's death being pushed aside? Why isn't her caretaker being held accountable for Christina's death, and why isn't she answering any questions? Why isn't the CEO of Casmir Care Services responding to questions?
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 2014 | By Shaun Brady, For The Inquirer
In its first two years, the story of the Center City Jazz Festival tended to focus on its precarious financial situation. Less than two months before the inaugural event in 2012, trombonist and founder Ernest Stuart still had his fingers crossed that his Kickstarter campaign would make his vision for the festival a reality. Last year, late funding came through that allowed a repeat performance and pianist Orrin Evans' Peco-sponsored headlining concert at UArts' Arts Bank Theater.
BUSINESS
April 15, 2014 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
So what happened, I asked Loews Corp. co-chairman Jonathan Tisch , to Sole Food ? The former fancy fish-themed street-level restaurant at Loews Philadelphia Hotel, Center City's third-largest, was replaced last week by Bank & Bourbon , part of what Loews says is a $25 million improvement, including room upgrades and a lot more places to plug in your devices. "It was a concept we thought reflected a period when people were trying to eat lighter," said Tisch, whose father and uncle founded the Loews chain 70 years ago. Loews has found that Americans talk low-fat but still prefer to eat and drink "heartier," as Tisch put it in a visit marking the upgrades.
NEWS
April 14, 2014 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
OLD CITY The Shirt Corner and the Suit Corner buildings had been through a lot during their nearly 200 years at Third and Market Streets, but somehow they always found a way to adapt. Only two months ago, the two were still inseparable companions, still standing eyeball-to-eyeball, still trying to outdo each other with their blazing, red-white-and-blue facade graphics. Today, the Suit Corner, on the southwest corner, is a smoldering ruin, its roof gone, its timbers charred black from Wednesday's fire.
NEWS
April 12, 2014 | By Jessica Parks, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA Former President Bill Clinton delivered a rousing speech Thursday to promote Marjorie Margolies' congressional campaign, assuring the audience that "I would be here even if her son weren't my son-in-law. " In a 25-minute stump speech at the Radisson Blu Warwick Hotel in Center City, Clinton praised Margolies not only for casting the deciding vote on his spending plan during her stint in Congress, but also for her work on gun control, student loans, and women's issues at home and abroad.
NEWS
April 11, 2014 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Columnist
IF CHRISTINA SANKEY had been an angel-faced toddler when she went missing, we might know by now how she wound up dead, half-naked and alone, between two parked cars in West Philly on a frigid winter morning. The city would've been galvanized by her death. Government officials would've promised to find out how she met her tragic end. Someone would've created a sidewalk memorial, and others would've led prayer vigils to honor the life that was lost. But Christina, 37, had the mentality of a 2-year-old, but not the physique.
NEWS
April 11, 2014 | BY DAVID GAMBACORTA, Daily News Staff Writer gambacd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5994
THE MEMORY is as clear as day in Rabbi Arthur Waskow's mind. It was sometime in 2010, and he was at a beach, watching his young granddaughter frolic with seagulls along the edge of the Atlantic Ocean. His mind drifted to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, and he wondered what kind of world his granddaughter would inherit, what kind of environmental disasters she'd witness. Waskow said that haunting thought inspired him to be a part of a multifaith crowd that gathered in Center City yesterday to protest the dangers of trains that carry crude oil through Philadelphia.
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