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REAL_ESTATE
October 19, 2014 | By Erin Arvedlund, Inquirer Staff Writer
Cara Schneider Bongiorno and her husband, Charles Bongiorno, a physician, are true Philadelphians: They've made the most of their 20-by-12-foot concrete back yard by converting it into a graceful garden and May-through-November party space with seating. Many city residents rely on a concrete pad behind their homes to serve as their "outdoors. " The Bongiornos were determined to bring true green to their space and to decorate it in a way that would be inviting for a barbecue with friends, a glass of wine in the evenings after work, or just a quiet refuge.
NEWS
October 16, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ralph Tekel, 94, of Center City, a retired La Salle University chemistry professor who as a graduate student contributed to the Manhattan Project - albeit without his knowledge - died Wednesday, Oct. 8, of pneumonia at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital. According to his daughter Billie Elias, in 1944 Dr. Tekel was part of a research team led by Dr. Henry Hass at Purdue University called Project 220. The team was asked to prepare Freon-like materials called fluorocarbons, Elias said.
NEWS
October 14, 2014
J OSH GOLDBLUM, 37, of Center City, is founder and CEO of Bluecadet, a digital-design firm that works with museums, universities and nonprofits to create websites, mobile apps and interactive installations. Goldblum, who grew up in Abington, founded Bluecadet in 2007. Recently, the Greater Philadelphia Chamber of Commerce named him its Small Business Person of the Year for 2015. Q: How'd you come up with the idea for Bluecadet? A: I was a technical designer at the Smithsonian American Art Museum, and later I collaborated with other museums and freelanced.
NEWS
October 12, 2014 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ray K. Metzker, 83, widely considered one of the nation's greatest photographers, died Thursday, Oct. 9, after a long illness. A spare and somewhat laconic figure, Mr. Metzker came to Philadelphia in 1962 to teach at the Philadelphia College of Art - now part of the University of the Arts - and fell in love with the shadow-streaked streets of the old city. Known for his black-and-white images of the urban streetscape - a man walking past the Fidelity Bank building, a woman captured by a shaft of sunlight, a sailor in whites stepping into an ominous shadow - Mr. Metzker walked the city decade after decade, finding the remarkable in the ordinary and the powerful in the most fleeting.
BUSINESS
October 11, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
The St. Peter Claver Center for Evangelization in Center City, which has served black Catholics for nearly 30 years, will close at the end of this month, the Archdiocese of Philadelphia announced. The center, housed in the former St. Peter Claver Roman Catholic Church at 12th and Lombard Streets, a historically black parish, was originally slated to close two years ago amid major archdiocesan cutbacks, including the layoff of a quarter of the staff at headquarters. But the archdiocese's Office for Black Catholics, part of the Secretariat for Evangelization, appealed the decision, and the center was given a reprieve because grants from outside the archdiocese were supporting its programs.
NEWS
October 10, 2014 | BY SOLOMON LEACH, Daily News Staff Writer leachs@phillynews.com, 215-854-5903
The head of the American Federation of Teachers met privately with elected officials in Philadelphia yesterday to urge them to call on the school district to return to the bargaining table days after the district unilaterally cancelled the contract with teachers and imposed healthcare benefits changes. Randi Weingarten, AFT president, voiced outrage at the School Reform Commission's bombshell earlier this week, which came after 21 months of negotiations with the local chapter. She assailed it as a last-ditch effort to aid Gov. Corbett's fledgling campaign three weeks before the gubernatorial election.
BUSINESS
October 9, 2014 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Biddle Building at 1217 Sansom St., investor Leonard Thylan 's former jewelry factory, was supposed to be part of a boutique hotel that never got built. Instead, it has been renovated and won new life as a home to tech and creative companies. Enterprise-mobility software-maker CloudMine , once a tenant at The Inquirer's digital incubator, is taking a floor at the Biddle. Branding agency At Media is taking half of another floor. So is ad and marketing agency Ark Ideas , and several more firms are in talks, say the brokers at the PernaFrederick real estate agency, which represents some of the new-era firms where workers seem to care more about bike lockups than car garages.
NEWS
October 9, 2014 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Philadelphia loan broker responsible for lining up funding for some of Center City's most high-profile recent developments was sentenced Tuesday to 16 years in prison for his role in a $26 million fraud that bilked nearly 2,000 hopeful entrepreneurs out of money they gave him to secure small-business financing. As part of an agreement with prosecutors, Matthew McManus, a former co-owner of Remington Financial Group, agreed to pay back $17.7 million to his victims. He said Tuesday that he was "truly and painstakingly sorry" for his crimes - an admission that left U.S. District Judge William H. Yohn Jr. puzzled.
NEWS
October 8, 2014 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
A post office worker in Philadelphia has been charged with allegedly stealing nearly $29,000 intended for customer money orders, city prosecutors said Monday. Felicia Townsend, 35, of the 400 block of North Simpson Street in West Philadelphia, was arrested Sept. 30 and charged with receiving stolen property, theft, unlawful use of a computer, and tampering with public records. Townsend allegedly voided money orders after the customer left the post office and then pocketed the money, prosecutors said.
BUSINESS
October 7, 2014 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Columnist
Soldering torch in hand, Elyse Aion sat at the workbench at the rear of her store in Rockledge, affixing numbers to a police badge. The irony of it made the 64-year-old Upper Dublin resident laugh. Years ago, she had been a hippie living in San Francisco - in Haight-Ashbury, epicenter of the counter-culture movement, where, Aion noted, "nobody liked the police. " Now, they are her bread and butter at Berben Insignia Co., a tiny business with a massive footprint supplying badges to police, fire and security departments, as well as the movie and TV industries.
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