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Center City

NEWS
June 24, 2014 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
Their pain poured for blocks down Broad Street. Their elation echoed north toward City Hall. As the United States men's soccer team battled Portugal to a 2-2 draw at the World Cup in Brazil on Sunday, Philadelphia soccer enthusiasts proved that at least for one night, on one Center City block, they could rival the world's most fervent sports fans. Neither rain nor a sluggish start for the Americans dampened the enthusiasm of the hundreds crowded in front of a big screen set up at the intersection 15th and Locust Streets, outside Fadó Irish Pub. Draped in red, white, and blue, they cheered, groaned, and drank in equal measure.
BUSINESS
June 21, 2014 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
ParenteBeard , a Philadelphia-based accounting firm that employs nearly 1,000 CPAs and staff at offices across Pennsylvania and in the New York area, Baltimore, and Dallas, has been in merger talks with Baker, Tilly, Virchow, Krause L.L.P. , a Chicago firm that employs 1,500, both firms confirmed Thursday after I called to ask about staff memos detailing the discussions. The proposal would result in ParenteBeard's being merged into the larger firm, under the Chicago firm's name and leadership.
NEWS
June 20, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Joseph J. MacNamara, 85, of Turnersville, a former Defense Department contract administrator in Moorestown and Camden, died of cancer Tuesday, June 17, at home. Born in West Philadelphia, he attended West Catholic High School and transferred to a seminary of the Augustinian religious order on Staten Island, N.Y., a son, Joseph J. Jr., said. After two years there, Mr. MacNamara worked as a radar technician on the aircraft carrier Oriskany. From 1950 to 1960, he was a teller for First Pennsylvania Bank, and until 1963, he worked for the IRS. Mr. MacNamara began his 30-year Defense Department career in 1963 as a contract administrator at a Center City office, his son said.
BUSINESS
June 20, 2014 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bank capital, which long flowed out of postindustrial Philadelphia and into its growing suburbs, is now flowing the other way, if a deal Wednesday is any sign. Univest Corp. , the Souderton company that runs one of the largest banks still based in the Philadelphia area, is moving downtown with its deal to buy Valley Green Bank - based in the city's Mount Airy section, with branches in Center City and South Philly - for $76 million in stock, worth about $27 a share. "My shareholders are very happy today," Valley Green chief executive Jay Goldstein told me. He said the sale price was triple the $9 a share the bank's 300 owners invested, starting when it opened in 2005.
NEWS
June 20, 2014 | BY JASON NARK, Daily News Staff Writer narkj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5916
SOMETIMES THEY turn on the television in the office, to scramble the sound of babies screaming. They'll jump up from their computers and suggest a coffee break, hoping sunlight and some conversation will fade the images they've just seen. Some go running, letting rage push their pace, tears and sweat mixing over the miles. No matter what they do to decompress, the investigators, lawyers and forensic analysts who handle child-pornography cases say they can't outrun the first image they saw on the job, let alone the thousands of other horrors their eyes and ears have witnessed.
NEWS
June 20, 2014 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
What restaurant should go on the top floor of the second Comcast Corp. tower? How many whiteboards might the Comcaster of the future use? What keeps staffers in Center City from doing their best work? How can Comcast create an urban vibe that competes for talent with suburban West Coast technology campuses? "When you have a project of this magnitude, there are a million moving parts," said Karen Dougherty Buchholz, the woman who choreographed Philadelphia's 2000 Republican National Convention and is now the Comcast senior vice president leading the new tower project.
NEWS
June 20, 2014 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
Immigrants in the suburbs appear "less skeptical of Philadelphia's assets" than their native-born neighbors, a new report on the region's foreign-born finds. These immigrants are "more bullish on the city than might be expected," given that they reside outside it, said Amanda Bergson-Shilcock, a principal author of "Choosing Philadelphia: Attracting and Retaining Immigrant Newcomers," released Wednesday by the Welcoming Center for New Pennsylvanians. The Philadelphia-based nonprofit, founded in 2003, is rooted in the belief that a steady influx of immigrants can do for the local economy what it has already done for the population - grow it. The center provides training and employment services for immigrants who are here legally.
NEWS
June 19, 2014 | BY DYLAN SEGELBAUM, Daily News Staff Writer segelbd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5917
AT THE PUNK Rock Flea Market in North Philadelphia, you'll find everything from vendors hawking pornographic plates, used Polaroid cameras and wooden roses to two friends promising to deliver a "frank assessment" of your looks for $1. "I think it's cool," said Kevin Donley, 26, of Fairmount. "It's a lot of unique vendors," he said of the two-day flea market, which draws 3,000 people a day. "You'll never find this stuff walking around in any store. " Since its inception in 2001, the "alternative" flea market has grown from a one-day event with fewer than 20 tables to a biannual, two-day event held in a 36,000-square-foot warehouse at 9th and Spring Garden streets - advertised mostly through word-of-mouth.
NEWS
June 17, 2014
DIANE PETERS was looking for love in all the wrong places, or at least one wrong place. Peters, 44, is pretty, single, a social worker for a Center City medical nonprofit, happy even while wanting a counterpart - a committed, successful male. A Colorado native who never married or had kids, Peters tried the usual things. She asked friends if they knew "anyone" (meaning an eligible male), went to wine tastings, sporting events, church, some singles events, but couldn't connect with the man of her dreams.
NEWS
June 16, 2014 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
INSIDE A GRAND old building in Center City, history buffs and scholars can examine centuries-old documents signed by George Washington and Abraham Lincoln. Re-enactors of long-ago wars can research details of past eras. Citizens can trace ancestors and their activities back generations. But soon, anyone aiming to do such things will have to trek nearly 20 miles north to a secluded business park at the city's edge. U.S. Archivist David S. Ferriero announced in March that the National Archives at Philadelphia's facility in the Robert N.C. Nix, Sr. Federal Building, on Chestnut Street near 9th, would be among three nationally to close to cut costs.
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