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NEWS
June 3, 2014 | BY DYLAN SEGELBAUM, Daily News Staff Writer segelbd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5917
WHEN KYLE MINK heard that Rosa's Fresh Pizza in Center City was giving away pizza to the homeless, he went there, walked up to the counter and got two plain slices - no questions asked. Then, he ate them in the shop in disbelief. "It's amazing," said Mink, 30, who sleeps in an alley on a piece of cardboard at night. "They're the only people doing something like this, you know? And I'm very grateful for it. " Mink is one of up to 30 men and women who regularly stop by Rosa's to take advantage of a program that lets the homeless have slices of pizza paid for in advance by generous customers.
NEWS
June 2, 2014 | BY BECKY BATCHA & MATT NESTOR, Daily News Staff Writers batchab@phillynews.com, 215-854-5757
THINKING YOU might feel stuck in the city while the shorebirds have all the fun. Nah! The calendar is packed with street fairs, festivals, parades, fireworks and more to keep you festivily occupied all summer. Thinking you might feel shore-deprived, despite it all? A pop-up beach alternative makes its debut along the Delaware to scratch your boardwalk itch. Odunde Festival, June 8. Celebration of African-American culture starts with a lovely offering of food and flowers, continues with a parade and street fair, and wraps with a concert - this year, with headliner Rakim.
NEWS
June 2, 2014 | By Jennifer Lin, Inquirer Staff Writer
For months, Nancy Winkler and Jay Bryan went out of their way not to pass by 22d and Market Streets. They lived only three blocks away, so it wasn't easy. But avoiding that corner forever would be almost impossible. When the couple did finally find themselves there in April, what they saw only deepened the sadness in their lives - a barren lot, long and narrow, strewn front to back with accumulated garbage. "It was depressing to see that people were trashing it," Bryan said.
NEWS
May 30, 2014 | BY CINDY STANSBURY, Daily News Staff Writer stansbc@phillynews.com, 215-854-5914
ON NOV. 13, 1982, Deputy Sheriff Roy J. Fortson Jr. was killed while engaging with two gunmen who were attempting to rob the Majestic Bar on the 400 block of North 36th Street. He was the first deputy sheriff in the city to die in the line of duty. Yesterday morning, members of the Philadelphia Police Department, friends and family gathered to watch as a Hero Plaque was dedicated in Fortson's honor outside the Criminal Justice Center on Filbert Street near 13th in Center City. "To be able to be a part of these events is really just so rewarding to me," said attorney James J. Binns, founder of the Hero Plaque Program.
REAL_ESTATE
May 25, 2014 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Research by a pair of professors at the University of Chicago Booth School of Business has found that "shabby urban neighborhoods are the wisest choice" for real estate investors. Savvy investors, study authors Veronica Guerrieri and Eric Hurst say, "are looking for a place to park their money in preparation for the next boom. " The most promising urban real estate can be found in rundown neighborhoods bordering upper-class areas, they say. From my observations in Philadelphia (and Chicago, New York and San Francisco)
NEWS
May 22, 2014 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
While all was calm at the polling place at the First Presbyterian Church, in Center City, Tuesday morning, a rather sticky situation did develop. Voters leaving the polls expressed dissatisfaction over the lack of "I voted today" stickers. Husband and wife psychologist team David Greenwald and Wendy Foreman joked that they liked to collect their election-day stickers. Young attorney Kate Ericsson also was displeased about not getting a sticker, especially because she was running late to work.
NEWS
May 21, 2014 | By Helen Ubinas, Daily News Columnist
I WENT TO Harrity Elementary School in West Philly last week to get a sneak listen to the Sister Cities Girlchoir before their big concert. I don't use the term "big" lightly here. On Sunday, about 700 proud relatives, friends and supporters filled Center City's Church of the Holy Trinity for their annual fundraiser. It was a sight to behold, especially when just two years ago founder Alysia Lee was new to town, and knocking on doors looking for funding and girls to join the choir.
NEWS
May 20, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
So, who was Continental Army Maj. William Jackson? "It's not a name memorized by schoolkids in history class," John Hopkins, coordinator for Christ Church Burial Ground, told folks gathered there Sunday afternoon. "It's more like an answer to a Jeopardy! question," Hopkins suggested, his mention of a TV show lightening the ceremony at Jackson's grave at the southeastern corner of Fifth and Arch Streets in Center City. So who was Jackson? Certainly not the tourist attraction of Benjamin Franklin, whose grave is a few steps up a grassy row. But a man of merit: Secretary of the Constitutional Convention which, on Sept.
NEWS
May 19, 2014 | BY DAVID GAMBACORTA, Daily News Staff Writer gambacd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5994
TOM LOOMIS has been strumming in the Woodland String Band for a couple of decades now, so don't bother questioning his loyalty to the Mummers. But Loomis, the president of the String Band Association, is also a realist. Like just about anything else in life, the 114-year-old New Year's Day parade needs to evolve if it wants to endure. With that in mind, Loomis and other Mummers leaders are planning to meet with city officials next week to discuss the possibility of changing the parade route, which winds its way up Broad Street, from Oregon Avenue in South Philly to a judging stand near City Hall.
NEWS
May 17, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ending decades of divided control of the subterranean realm beneath Center City, SEPTA soon will be in charge of cleaning, maintaining, and repairing almost everything under the streets. That should mean improved cleanliness, lighting, and safety as SEPTA uses new state funding to upgrade the long-neglected passageways, agency officials said Thursday. A new 30-year lease with the city gives SEPTA responsibility for the 3.5 miles of city-owned concourses along Market Street from Eighth to 18th Streets and south to the Walnut-Locust subway station, as well as the elevators and escalators that serve the Broad Street and Market-Frankford Lines.
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