CollectionsCenter For Immigration Studies
IN THE NEWS

Center For Immigration Studies

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
September 9, 2003 | By Thomas Ginsberg INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Even as the Bush administration urges police to watch out for illegal immigrants, it wants to stop reimbursing them for jailing criminal immigrants. Last year, Washington gave $10.9 million to New Jersey state and county governments and $2.6 million to Pennsylvania governments for handling thousands of suspected or convicted criminals who were foreign nationals - illegal or not. Nationwide, it gave $565 million. The little-known State Criminal Alien Assistance Program was created in 1994 to compensate local agencies for "the federal government's failure to enforce its immigration laws," says the Justice Department inspector general.
NEWS
September 2, 2010 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
The number of illegal immigrants in America stopped growing for the first time since 1990 - dropping from a peak of 12 million to 11.1 million last year, according to a Pew Hispanic Center study released Wednesday. The average annual influx of illegal immigrants dropped as well, from 850,000 in the first five years of the current decade, to 300,000 in 2009. The findings, based on extrapolations of U.S. Census data, may be attributable to fewer jobs in the troubled U.S. economy and harsher enforcement on the Southern border, Pew demographer Jeffrey Passel said.
NEWS
July 14, 2008 | By REGINA MEDINA, medinar@phillynews.com 215-854-5985
BIZARRO WORLD NOT only exists in Superman comic books and "Seinfeld" episodes, it's alive and kicking in Alberta, Canada. An oil boom. A robust economy. Universal health care - free next year. What's unfolding in the western Canadian province of 3.5 million people is so far removed from Philadelphia's (and most of the country's) reality that, frankly, it's almost bizarro . There's more. Highly lauded schools. Low crime rates. Low unemployment. Low taxes. A surplus of jobs.
NEWS
September 29, 2010 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
After he was convicted of assaulting a Philadelphia man in 1998, Cambodian refugee Mout Iv knew he was in the United States on borrowed time. As it turned out, quite a lot of borrowed time. He was freed from a Pennsylvania prison after four years, but paperwork snafus prevented his immediate return to Cambodia, as required by law. So immigration agents put Iv on "supervised release," allowing him to open a barber shop in Olney The government kept tabs on him with scheduled interviews, random phone calls, and unannounced visits.
NEWS
February 28, 2003 | By Thomas Ginsberg INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Created during the Depression when more people were leaving America than arriving, the Immigration and Naturalization Service will vanish at midnight tonight, undone by terrorism. Outwardly, little will change when three smaller bureaus appear in the agency's place at 12:01 a.m. tomorrow and become central pillars of the mammoth new Department of Homeland Security in the biggest government reorganization in six decades, according to federal officials. For hundreds of millions of immigrants, foreign visitors, refugees and even deportees, the INS has been the gatekeeper of this immigrant nation since 1933 - and few are likely to miss it. "We aren't shedding tears for the old INS, nor are we jumping for joy at what replaces it," said Angela Kelley, deputy director of the National Immigration Forum, a leading immigrant-advocacy group.
NEWS
October 16, 2003 | By Thomas Ginsberg INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Street administration has told city workers not to report "mere undocumented aliens" to federal agents or deny immigrants any services such as health care or education. City Solicitor Nelson A. Diaz, in a memorandum dated Oct. 10, puts Philadelphia among a handful of cities - including New York - that formally refuse to help the federal government pursue ordinary illegal immigrants. "Individuals should know that they may seek and obtain the assistance of city agencies . . . without negative consequences to their personal lives," Diaz said in the memo released by immigrant advocates yesterday.
NEWS
March 19, 2003 | By Maria Panaritis INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In every major category except Medicaid, the number of immigrants on welfare has dropped since 1996, the year major changes were made to the federal assistance program, according to a new study. Nationwide, fewer immigrant and native-born American households received food stamps, cash assistance and welfare-to-work benefits in 2001 than during the year Congress enacted welfare reforms, according to the study released this week by the Center for Immigration Studies. In the Philadelphia area, however, the overall trend was upward: The number of immigrant households on some form of welfare nearly doubled to an estimated 35,000 in the second half of the decade.
NEWS
March 24, 2011 | By BEN WAXMAN
PHILADELPHIA spent a week celebrating the news that, after 60 years of population decline, we're finally growing. The new census reveals that the city added 8,456 people over the last decade, reclaiming the mantle of "fifth-largest city" from Phoenix and prompting numerous happy jokes about Phillie Cliff Lee. But the data bear unpacking. Because the city's growth wasn't as simple as 8,500 new people showing up. The city lost about 80,000 residents, but replaced them largely with immigrants from poor countries like Vietnam, the Dominican Republic and Mexico.
NEWS
January 22, 2013 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
Unable to win congressional reform of immigration in his first term, President Obama forced changes by fiat. He halted deportation of eligible youth. He prioritized enforcement against illegal immigrants who commit crimes over civil violators who just overstay visas. Propelled to reelection on a wave of votes by naturalized Latinos, Obama soon will propose an omnibus overhaul of immigration law. Its centerpiece: a path to citizenship for the nation's estimated 11 million illegal immigrants, including 160,000 in Pennsylvania and 550,000 in New Jersey.
NEWS
May 12, 2007 | By Jennifer Moroz INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It took an alleged terror plot for federal authorities to pay attention to the Duka brothers, the three illegal immigrants who were accused this week of planning to attack soldiers at Fort Dix. But the Yugoslavian-born siblings may have flown under the radar for a long time before that, going to school, working jobs, registering businesses - even repeatedly having run-ins with police - without their right to be in this country being questioned....
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 22, 2013 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
Unable to win congressional reform of immigration in his first term, President Obama forced changes by fiat. He halted deportation of eligible youth. He prioritized enforcement against illegal immigrants who commit crimes over civil violators who just overstay visas. Propelled to reelection on a wave of votes by naturalized Latinos, Obama soon will propose an omnibus overhaul of immigration law. Its centerpiece: a path to citizenship for the nation's estimated 11 million illegal immigrants, including 160,000 in Pennsylvania and 550,000 in New Jersey.
NEWS
June 13, 2011 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
As she dressed for her daughter's Head Start graduation last week, Zulma Villatoro teetered between bursts of happiness and flashes of fear. "I am here," she said, "but I am not here. " In less than three weeks, Villatoro, 28 and pregnant with her second child, will be deported to Guatemala - the land of her birth, but frightfully foreign to someone who has spent half of her life in the United States. Villatoro was 14 when she arrived here as an illegal immigrant in 1998 and joined her likewise undocumented mother in Chester.
NEWS
March 24, 2011 | By BEN WAXMAN
PHILADELPHIA spent a week celebrating the news that, after 60 years of population decline, we're finally growing. The new census reveals that the city added 8,456 people over the last decade, reclaiming the mantle of "fifth-largest city" from Phoenix and prompting numerous happy jokes about Phillie Cliff Lee. But the data bear unpacking. Because the city's growth wasn't as simple as 8,500 new people showing up. The city lost about 80,000 residents, but replaced them largely with immigrants from poor countries like Vietnam, the Dominican Republic and Mexico.
NEWS
September 29, 2010 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
After he was convicted of assaulting a Philadelphia man in 1998, Cambodian refugee Mout Iv knew he was in the United States on borrowed time. As it turned out, quite a lot of borrowed time. He was freed from a Pennsylvania prison after four years, but paperwork snafus prevented his immediate return to Cambodia, as required by law. So immigration agents put Iv on "supervised release," allowing him to open a barber shop in Olney The government kept tabs on him with scheduled interviews, random phone calls, and unannounced visits.
NEWS
September 2, 2010 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
The number of illegal immigrants in America stopped growing for the first time since 1990 - dropping from a peak of 12 million to 11.1 million last year, according to a Pew Hispanic Center study released Wednesday. The average annual influx of illegal immigrants dropped as well, from 850,000 in the first five years of the current decade, to 300,000 in 2009. The findings, based on extrapolations of U.S. Census data, may be attributable to fewer jobs in the troubled U.S. economy and harsher enforcement on the Southern border, Pew demographer Jeffrey Passel said.
NEWS
July 14, 2008 | By REGINA MEDINA, medinar@phillynews.com 215-854-5985
BIZARRO WORLD NOT only exists in Superman comic books and "Seinfeld" episodes, it's alive and kicking in Alberta, Canada. An oil boom. A robust economy. Universal health care - free next year. What's unfolding in the western Canadian province of 3.5 million people is so far removed from Philadelphia's (and most of the country's) reality that, frankly, it's almost bizarro . There's more. Highly lauded schools. Low crime rates. Low unemployment. Low taxes. A surplus of jobs.
NEWS
August 21, 2007 | By Michael Matza INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With the federal government pledging to crack down on undocumented workers by using Social Security records as its principal sledge, companies that employ large numbers of immigrants are preparing to feel the heat. The Welcoming Center for New Pennsylvanians, a job center for foreign-born workers, with offices in Philadelphia and Upper Darby, is gearing up, too - for the expected fallout. "We're very worried about this," said Anne O'Callaghan, the center's executive director.
NEWS
May 12, 2007 | By Jennifer Moroz INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It took an alleged terror plot for federal authorities to pay attention to the Duka brothers, the three illegal immigrants who were accused this week of planning to attack soldiers at Fort Dix. But the Yugoslavian-born siblings may have flown under the radar for a long time before that, going to school, working jobs, registering businesses - even repeatedly having run-ins with police - without their right to be in this country being questioned....
NEWS
October 16, 2003 | By Thomas Ginsberg INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Street administration has told city workers not to report "mere undocumented aliens" to federal agents or deny immigrants any services such as health care or education. City Solicitor Nelson A. Diaz, in a memorandum dated Oct. 10, puts Philadelphia among a handful of cities - including New York - that formally refuse to help the federal government pursue ordinary illegal immigrants. "Individuals should know that they may seek and obtain the assistance of city agencies . . . without negative consequences to their personal lives," Diaz said in the memo released by immigrant advocates yesterday.
NEWS
September 9, 2003 | By Thomas Ginsberg INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Even as the Bush administration urges police to watch out for illegal immigrants, it wants to stop reimbursing them for jailing criminal immigrants. Last year, Washington gave $10.9 million to New Jersey state and county governments and $2.6 million to Pennsylvania governments for handling thousands of suspected or convicted criminals who were foreign nationals - illegal or not. Nationwide, it gave $565 million. The little-known State Criminal Alien Assistance Program was created in 1994 to compensate local agencies for "the federal government's failure to enforce its immigration laws," says the Justice Department inspector general.
1 | 2 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|