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NEWS
January 24, 1997
President Clinton and his party are trying to sidle a few steps away from the freewheeling, big-money bazaar of campaign finance. This response to revelations about their fund-raising excesses last year is no substitute for a sweeping, bipartisan cleanup. But it's not meaningless, either. Last year, the party had to return about $1.5 million in donations that were illegal or at least questionable because the donor of record didn't seem to be the real giver. Lots of that money came from overseas businesses or individuals.
NEWS
October 20, 1998 | By James A. Duffy, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Interest groups are attempting to preserve the political status quo with a flood of campaign contributions to incumbents in Congress, a study released yesterday by the Center for Responsive Politics indicates. Nearly two-thirds of the incumbents seeking reelection in this year's House and Senate races received so much money by June 30 of this year that they had at least a 10-to-1 fund-raising advantage over their challengers, the study shows. The giving was measured by the nonpartisan research organization for the first 18 months of the current election cycle that began in January of 1997 using data from the Federal Election Commission.
NEWS
August 27, 1992 | By Anne Tergesen, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
"What country do you live in?" Louise Rubello screamed at the grainy image of President Bush on the TV set as he accepted his party's nomination. The 25 people gathered in Matsy and Bob Lieber's Medford home pelted foam blocks at the screen amid shouts of derision. The political merrymakers, members and supporters of the statewide Women's Coalition for Clinton/Gore, came to raise money to aid the Democratic ticket and to increase the clout of women within the party. The coalition, established by two North Jersey women in December, exists to "change the sex ratio (in)
NEWS
August 24, 2012
IN THIS PRESIDENTIAL election cycle, the nonpartisan Center for Responsive Politics estimates $2.5 billion will be spent convincing Americans who they should choose for the next commander in chief. That's an obscene amount of money, and oodles of it will be spent in about a dozen battleground states - Nevada (6 electoral votes), Colorado (9), Iowa (6), Wisconsin (10), Ohio (18), Florida (29), North Carolina (15), Virginia (13), New Hampshire (4), Michigan (16), Connecticut (7), New Mexico (5)
NEWS
November 27, 2010 | By Cynthia Burton, Inquirer Staff Writer
New Jersey is considering a cutting-edge campaign-disclosure law that would bring well-heeled groups out of the shadows. Dubbed "super political action committees" by those who keep an eye on them, the groups can spend millions of dollars to influence elections but do not have to disclose their donors because they are organized for "education" or "issues advocacy. " In the recent midterm federal elections, they spent more than $1.6 million in New Jersey, according to Jeff Brindle, head of the Election Law Enforcement Commission.
NEWS
October 27, 1996 | By Chris Conway, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Last spring, 18 Texas residents each gave $2,000 to one of the hardest-fought political campaigns in the nation. All gave the maximum allowed by federal law. Their checks totaled $36,000, and all but two gave on the same day - June 3, 1996. The two others wrote their checks May 30. But the money didn't go to the local congressional race, nor to any Texas campaign. It went more than 1,000 miles away - to New Jersey Democrat Bob Torricelli's campaign for the U.S. Senate. Why?
NEWS
August 2, 2004 | By Nancy Petersen INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A woman who took on AT&T and won has now set her sights on an even bigger prize: Congress. Lois Herr, chairwoman of the Lancaster County Planning Commission and a retired marketing executive, is working hard to move one of the country's safest Republican districts into the Democratic column. "There is considerable support for ideas that are in opposition to those of Mr. Bush," said Herr, 62, a political novice who lives in Elizabethtown, Pa. "We could do better for our children, working people and senior citizens.
NEWS
October 30, 2003 | By Kaitlin Gurney and Wendy Ruderman INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Democrat Fred Madden has amassed $3.3 million - more than any other legislative candidate in New Jersey history - in his quest to go from career state trooper to state senator. With the parties spending enormous amounts on just a few razor-close legislative races, Madden's bid to unseat State Sen. George Geist, a longtime Republican lawmaker in the Fourth District, has electrified an otherwise-mundane affair. All 120 Assembly and Senate seats will be decided at the polls Tuesday.
NEWS
December 10, 2012 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, Inquirer Politics Writer
WASHINGTON - In national politics, this was the year of the super PAC. Along with "dark money" nonprofits that don't have to disclose their donors, they poured billions into the 2012 election, most of it boosting Mitt Romney and Republican candidates for Congress. Yet Big Money won barely a third of the races it tried to sway, according to the nonpartisan Sunlight Foundation. "Seldom has so much been spent for so little," said political scientist Thomas Mann. Maybe, as some argue, the loosening of controls on campaign spending, occasioned by the Citizens United Supreme Court ruling and Federal Election Commission regulatory decisions, is not so harmful after all. Several of the top experts in campaign-finance law said last week, however, that the win-loss record is not an accurate measure of the harm done by the money now sloshing around the political system.
BUSINESS
January 17, 2011 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
Stephen Aichele is one of the region's best-known real estate lawyers, in addition to being chairman of Saul Ewing L.L.P., the prominent Center City law firm. He's a legal dervish who over the years has had his hand in projects as diverse as the Convention Center expansion and suburban mall developments. So it's tempting to suggest that it was the real estate industry's now-going-on-five-year swoon that one day inspired Aichele to accept Gov.-elect Tom Corbett's offer to head his legal team in Harrisburg.
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NEWS
December 10, 2012 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, Inquirer Politics Writer
WASHINGTON - In national politics, this was the year of the super PAC. Along with "dark money" nonprofits that don't have to disclose their donors, they poured billions into the 2012 election, most of it boosting Mitt Romney and Republican candidates for Congress. Yet Big Money won barely a third of the races it tried to sway, according to the nonpartisan Sunlight Foundation. "Seldom has so much been spent for so little," said political scientist Thomas Mann. Maybe, as some argue, the loosening of controls on campaign spending, occasioned by the Citizens United Supreme Court ruling and Federal Election Commission regulatory decisions, is not so harmful after all. Several of the top experts in campaign-finance law said last week, however, that the win-loss record is not an accurate measure of the harm done by the money now sloshing around the political system.
NEWS
September 4, 2012 | By Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Staff Writer
On the increasingly polarized political map, Pennsylvania's Eighth District is a true swing district. Covering Bucks County and part of Montgomery, its voters stick to the middle of the road. They tend to be conservative fiscally, but skew slightly left on social issues, according to pollsters. They sent a Republican to Congress in 2004, voted Democratic in the next two House elections, and turned back to the GOP in 2010. National observers have listed this year's contest as one of the top House races in the country, and it is widely expected to be one of the few close fights in the Philadelphia area.
NEWS
August 24, 2012
IN THIS PRESIDENTIAL election cycle, the nonpartisan Center for Responsive Politics estimates $2.5 billion will be spent convincing Americans who they should choose for the next commander in chief. That's an obscene amount of money, and oodles of it will be spent in about a dozen battleground states - Nevada (6 electoral votes), Colorado (9), Iowa (6), Wisconsin (10), Ohio (18), Florida (29), North Carolina (15), Virginia (13), New Hampshire (4), Michigan (16), Connecticut (7), New Mexico (5)
BUSINESS
January 17, 2011 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
Stephen Aichele is one of the region's best-known real estate lawyers, in addition to being chairman of Saul Ewing L.L.P., the prominent Center City law firm. He's a legal dervish who over the years has had his hand in projects as diverse as the Convention Center expansion and suburban mall developments. So it's tempting to suggest that it was the real estate industry's now-going-on-five-year swoon that one day inspired Aichele to accept Gov.-elect Tom Corbett's offer to head his legal team in Harrisburg.
NEWS
November 27, 2010 | By Cynthia Burton, Inquirer Staff Writer
New Jersey is considering a cutting-edge campaign-disclosure law that would bring well-heeled groups out of the shadows. Dubbed "super political action committees" by those who keep an eye on them, the groups can spend millions of dollars to influence elections but do not have to disclose their donors because they are organized for "education" or "issues advocacy. " In the recent midterm federal elections, they spent more than $1.6 million in New Jersey, according to Jeff Brindle, head of the Election Law Enforcement Commission.
NEWS
August 2, 2004 | By Nancy Petersen INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A woman who took on AT&T and won has now set her sights on an even bigger prize: Congress. Lois Herr, chairwoman of the Lancaster County Planning Commission and a retired marketing executive, is working hard to move one of the country's safest Republican districts into the Democratic column. "There is considerable support for ideas that are in opposition to those of Mr. Bush," said Herr, 62, a political novice who lives in Elizabethtown, Pa. "We could do better for our children, working people and senior citizens.
NEWS
December 21, 2003 | By Craig R. McCoy and Mario F. Cattabiani INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
State Sen. Vincent J. Fumo's arrangement with Peco Energy Co. in which the electric giant gave $17 million in secret donations to a nonprofit group run by Fumo aides has come under harsh criticism from nonpartisan experts who track the role of money in politics. "This is very, very suspicious," said Lawrence Noble, executive director of the Center for Responsive Politics in Washington. "It looks like they are trying to curry favor with him. " Noble is among a number of scholars and activists who have questioned the growing practice of politicians steering money to nonprofits.
NEWS
October 30, 2003 | By Kaitlin Gurney and Wendy Ruderman INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Democrat Fred Madden has amassed $3.3 million - more than any other legislative candidate in New Jersey history - in his quest to go from career state trooper to state senator. With the parties spending enormous amounts on just a few razor-close legislative races, Madden's bid to unseat State Sen. George Geist, a longtime Republican lawmaker in the Fourth District, has electrified an otherwise-mundane affair. All 120 Assembly and Senate seats will be decided at the polls Tuesday.
NEWS
May 31, 2000 | By Robert Zausner, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
What does it cost to elect an American president? Well, more than the cost of filming Titanic. More than the annual budget for the Philadelphia Police Department. More than the gross national product of Grenada, population 97,800. The 2000 presidential election will exceed $500 million - as in half a billion dollars. That includes money raised by the candidates for the primaries, and federal funding for the primaries and general election. In addition, the major parties can each spend $13.7 million more in regulated "hard money" funds on combined efforts with the presidential nominees, which could bring spending on the race to roughly $540 million.
NEWS
October 20, 1998 | By James A. Duffy, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Interest groups are attempting to preserve the political status quo with a flood of campaign contributions to incumbents in Congress, a study released yesterday by the Center for Responsive Politics indicates. Nearly two-thirds of the incumbents seeking reelection in this year's House and Senate races received so much money by June 30 of this year that they had at least a 10-to-1 fund-raising advantage over their challengers, the study shows. The giving was measured by the nonpartisan research organization for the first 18 months of the current election cycle that began in January of 1997 using data from the Federal Election Commission.
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