CollectionsCenter Stage
IN THE NEWS

Center Stage

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
March 26, 1992 | Special to The Inquirer / JOAN FAIRMAN KANES
It was "International Week" at the Brandywine-Wallace Elementary School in Guthriesville, Pa., and students learned about a different country and its culture each day. Last Thursday night, the youngsters culminated their project by taking to the stage with song and dance.
NEWS
August 24, 1987 | By Tom Infield, Inquirer Staff Writer
Last year, it was Republican leader Bill Meehan himself who attracted all the attention at the annual Bill Meehan Clambake. Everybody wanted to know, "Who's it gonna be, Boss? Who ya gonna pick for mayor?" And all Meehan did was smile his inscrutable smile and reply that all his suitors looked good to him. Yesterday, at the third annual Meehan clambake up at the Bavarian Club in the Northeast, everything had changed. Meehan was in the background. At center stage was Frank L. Rizzo, the ex-Democratic mayor whom Meehan and the party had chosen to lead them out of the wilderness in 1987.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 1998 | By Jack Lloyd, FOR THE INQUIRER
You've come a long way, baby, but when was the last time you sawed a man in half on stage in front of hundreds of onlookers? We're talking magic here, the world of illusion. In this atmosphere - and there's no shortage of magic shows in Atlantic City - a woman's place is traditionally on the receiving end of the classic macho wizard's tricks. You know the drill: The cute, shapely young woman arrives on stage, climbs into a box and then, wrrrrr, just like that, the box is sawed in half.
NEWS
January 24, 1988 | By Sari Harrar, Special to The Inquirer
Dressed in Fred Astaire-style black tie and tails, Bob Woolley waltzed on stage at Haddonfield High School last weekend. Dan Miller pantomimed the swimming strokes that had taken him to the Special Olympics. And on the same stage, Beth Feudtner sat down at a baby grand piano and played "Somewhere Over the Rainbow. " Woolley, 26, Miller, 15, and Feudtner, 17, all have Down's syndrome. So do the six other young adults who co-starred in Once Upon a Wish, a variety show that brought entertainment and a story of personal achievement and community cooperation to an audience of 195 at Haddonfield High last weekend.
NEWS
May 12, 2000 | by Nolan Reese, For the Daily News
So, there's this girl named Jody. She's a good dancer and knows she's a good dancer, but no one else thinks so. She has two roommates, Eva, who can dance but has the "wrong attitude," and Maureen, who has the best dance form in the academy, an overbearing mom and an eating disorder. There's also Cooper, a choreographer who recognizes Jody's talent and sleeps with Jody. His old girlfriend, by the way, left him for the head of the dance company. And then there's Charlie, who has a crush on Jody and is a really good dancer.
NEWS
November 10, 2003 | By Paddy Noyes FOR THE INQUIRER
Demetrius is an affectionate, verbal, outgoing 9-year-old who thrives on being the center of attention. This aspect of his personality came in handy when he took an acting class, which he thoroughly enjoyed. His expressive brown eyes and his beaming smile charm those around him. Demetrius takes great pride in his appearance and grooming. He also is proud of learning to ride a bike and a scooter, and to roller-skate. He likes to read and keeps a daily journal where he records his private thoughts.
NEWS
October 5, 1989 | By Arlethia Perry, Special to The Inquirer
When you ask a Ukrainian-American to spell Ukraine, they might say, "There's rain in Ukraine. " But weather forecasters' predictions of rain in no way dampened spirits or attendance at the 13th annual Ukrainian Festival on Sunday, sponsored by Manor Junior College and the Ukrainian Heritage Study Center in Jenkintown. Philadelphia's Ukrainian community was out in force to celebrate its heritage with a day of song, dance, foods, master craft exhibits and activities for the entire family.
NEWS
October 20, 1988 | By Charles McCurdy, Special to The Inquirer
Dan Perna, whose theater career has included acting, teaching and directing in Main Line community, high school and college theater programs, likes to describe his 50-year career by listing some of his former students: Ron Richardson, who won a Tony award for his role in Big River; Charles Douglas, who played the title role in The Wiz on Broadway; Marisol Rodrigues, a television daytime series actress. But the name that comes up most often during conversations with Perna is that of his 3-month-old granddaughter, Julie Michelle Robinson.
NEWS
July 4, 2003
Just a few years ago, the National Constitution Center was little more than an idea, a dream, a tiny staff crammed into a corner of the Bourse - and a wagonload of doubts. Today, the $137.5 million center will formally open on Independence Mall, with grins, applause, melodies and a speech by a bemedaled justice of the U.S. Supreme Court. For months, the center has been rising at the Mall's north end, a poem of democratic praise rendered in glass and stone, reaching out in tribute to the brick shrine at the Mall's opposite end, Independence Hall.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 16, 2015 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
SOMERS POINT, N.J. - Instead of being lost forever to housing development along the waterfront of this gateway town to Ocean City, a little theater tucked along Bay Avenue will be sticking around for another encore. And the Gateway Playhouse - which has been sitting idle for nearly a decade - could become the centerpiece of an ongoing effort to redevelop the waterfront area along Great Bay as a dining and arts and entertainment district. Earlier this month, officials announced the city had received two state grants totaling about $500,000.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 2014 | By Ellen Gray
* OLIVE KITTERIDGE. 9 p.m. Sunday and Monday, HBO.   IT'S A RARE adaptation that doesn't make an audience choose between the source material and its offspring. The first playacting around a fire was probably greeted by at least one critic's claim that the cave-paintings were better and another's argument that they'd been just daubs on a wall until actors brought them to life. HBO's "Olive Kitteridge" doesn't brook such nonsense. In a two-night miniseries premiering Sunday, Frances McDormand takes the difficult title character from Elizabeth Strout's Pulitzer-winning collection of short stories out for a slightly different spin, but the result is less a challenge to Strout's vision than a broadening of it. It's true that McDormand now owns Olive, just as she will always own Marge Gunderson, the Oscar-winning "Fargo" character that FX's TV adaptation wasn't foolish enough to touch, and also in a more literal sense, in that she optioned the rights to "Olive Kitteridge" several years ago in the hopes of playing her. Her deft, marvelously matter-of-fact performance suggests she knew just what she was about.
SPORTS
October 9, 2014 | By Sam Carchidi, Inquirer Staff Writer
BOSTON - Claude Giroux's last 14 months have included finger surgery after his golf club shattered, an arrest for grabbing a policeman's buttocks in an Ottawa bar - "my misguided attempt at humor," he said - and a lower-body injury suffered 15 minutes into this season's training camp. "Bad luck," Giroux said, "kind of follows me. " Not on the ice. The Flyers captain has blossomed into one of the NHL's elite players. Giroux finished third in the NHL in scoring with 86 points and third in the MVP voting last season.
SPORTS
September 22, 2014 | BY DICK JERARDI, Daily News Staff Writer jerardd@phillynews.com
PARX CASINO is always open. The racetrack across the parking lot will open early today - 10 a.m., probably even earlier if there is a long line. There might be lines outside then, and definitely inside all day. The Kentucky Derby winner is running at Parx. California Chrome, making his first start since finishing fourth in the June 7 Belmont Stakes, will be in post position No. 1 in the $1 million Pennsylvania Derby, scheduled for 5:40 as the finale of a broadcast on The Comcast Network (4:30 to 6 p.m.)
SPORTS
May 20, 2014 | By Mike Sielski, Inquirer Columnist
She had so many true and heartfelt things to say about her school, and Emily Moran's greatest worry, as she prepared to deliver the commencement address Sunday at La Salle University, was that the words would pour out of her into a shapeless pile, like jelly beans from a bag. She has always talked fast, especially among those she knows best and loves most. "They keep telling me, 'You have to slow down,' " she said. It's no wonder why. She has five siblings. Her father is one of 15, and from those 14 aunts and uncles Emily Moran has 86 cousins.
SPORTS
May 17, 2014 | By Jeff McLane, Inquirer Staff Writer
Even though they allowed more yards in the air than any other defense in 2013, the Eagles did very little to change the core of their secondary this offseason. Free-agent safety Malcolm Jenkins was signed, in essence, to replace Patrick Chung, but the other starters or those near the top of the depth chart entering spring practices will return. A few second-tier free agents were added for competition and special teams, and the Eagles waited until the fourth and fifth rounds before selecting cornerback-safety Jaylen Watkins and safety Ed Reynolds.
BUSINESS
February 18, 2014 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
William R. Sasso, 67, calls himself a business lawyer - if you broaden the definition to include many of the region's most significant undertakings. A second casino in Philadelphia? Sasso, chairman of the Philadelphia law firm Stradley, Ronon, Stevens & Young L.L.P. and a cochairman of Gov. Corbett's transition team, backed casino contender Bart Blatstein and his project, the Provence. A huge hospital merger in Montgomery County? Sasso would have headed the combined board of Holy Redeemer and Abington Memorial Hospitals, had not the merger fallen apart over the issue of abortion.
NEWS
October 1, 2013 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
There have been many incarnations of and near-deaths for the storied Levoy Theatre in Millville, Cumberland County, from vaudeville emporium, silent-film house, talkie movie palace, eventually to boarded-up old wreck. And it collapsed into a pile of rubble during an initial renovation in 2010 before being miraculously reborn into the sweet little jewel-box that has recently dominated efforts to redevelop Millville from beleaguered glass-factory town into a trendy arts district. This month, the 105-year-old Levoy (pronounced "LEE-voy" if you're from around there, "la-VOY" if you're not)
SPORTS
June 14, 2013 | By Joe Juliano, Inquirer Staff Writer
The world's best players expected to enter Thursday's scheduled opening round of the U.S. Open with a game plan to tackle the dangerous twists and hazardous turns of the historic East Course at Merion Golf Club. However, when they hit their first tee shot of the 113th national championship, they will be faced with the question: Just what course are they playing? Rainfall totaling 61/2 inches over the last week has eliminated the chance that Merion will play firm and fast, the most severe conditions for each of the 156 contestants in the field.
NEWS
January 20, 2013 | BY ANGELO FICHERA, Daily News Staff Writer fichera@phillynews.com, 215-854-5913
B EHIND-THE-SCENES workers from the Philadelphia Theatre Co. took center stage Friday afternoon as they continued their two-day-old strike by protesting in front of the Suzanne Roberts Theatre on South Broad Street. Stagehands who recently unionized, including electricians, carpenters and prop makers, vowed not to return to work until management agreed to a contract with benefits, raises and improved work rules. A temporary contract expired in November. Negotiations fell through earlier this week but resumed Friday.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|