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NEWS
January 29, 1988
When it came to ferreting out the first details of the Iran-contra affair, Attorney General Edwin Meese 3d took charge himself. He visited the key players - CIA chief William J. Casey, the National Security Council's Oliver L. North. He didn't bring along Justice Department investigators. He didn't take notes. And a bit later, when the FBI searched Mr. North's office, Mr. North was out - he was down the hall still shredding documents. Consider the casualness of that performance along with allegations that surfaced this week that the FBI engaged in far-reaching spying on and infiltration of groups opposed to the Reagan administration's Central America policy.
NEWS
February 3, 1986 | By Kurt Pfitzer, Special to The Inquirer
It was 12 degrees, their hands were growing stiff with cold and they were stamping their feet to keep frostbite at bay. They faced a group hearing on charges of defiant trespass. If convicted, the maximum sentence could be 30 days in jail. Yet most were smiling as they lined up outside Montgomery County District Court in Willow Grove on Wednesday morning. They traded hugs and kisses with each other, and they traded pleasantries with the police officers and constables who were there to keep order.
NEWS
May 5, 2013 | By Jim Kuhnhenn, Associated Press
SAN JOSE, Costa Rica - President Obama, concluding a three-day visit to Mexico and Costa Rica, is cheering Mexican economic advances and pressing other Central American leaders to deal with poverty and security while reaching out to a politically powerful Latino audience back home. Boosted by reassuring jobs numbers, Obama is calling for greater trade and economic cooperation with the U.S.'s southern neighbors, arguing that economic prosperity is the best antidote to drug and gang violence and, by extension, to the illegal immigration that the United States is seeking to control.
NEWS
March 24, 1989 | By Susan Bennett, Inquirer Washington Bureau
Soviet Ambassador Yuri V. Dubinin said yesterday that the Soviet Union was open to any and all discussions with the United States about working together on a peaceful resolution of the conflict in Central America. Although senior Bush administration officials previously have reported no progress in talks with the Soviets on this topic, Dubinin told reporters that the Soviets had set no preconditions to talks. "We are open to discussion on all the subjects of common interests," Dubinin said at an appearance before the Overseas Writers Club here.
NEWS
January 15, 1989 | By Sam Dillon, Knight-Ridder News Service
Fighting in Central America, fueled by the superpowers over the last decade, has killed and maimed more than 100,000 and pauperized the region. But it has wrought little change in the regional balance of power. President Reagan mounted the most aggressively anti-communist policy in a generation, hoping to roll back what he called "Soviet expansionism" into the Americas. Yet he leaves office with revolutionaries still in charge in Cuba and Nicaragua. "Where's Reagan's success?"
NEWS
March 22, 1990 | By Anne Fahy, Special to The Inquirer
Against a black backdrop hung black and white scenes of brown-skinned peasants scratching out a meager existence. Those pictures, and the realities of life they exposed, brought most of the visitors to St. Joseph's University for the beginning of the 27th annual Pan American observance. In an upstairs room of the student center, visitors could see a tight shot of a leathery old man carrying a rusty pail on his bony shoulder and a wide- angle shot of little children standing in dust, gripping the web of a fence that keeps them in a refugee camp.
NEWS
March 7, 1986 | By Patrick J. Buchanan
Whether Central America follows Southeast Asia, Afghanistan and Angola as the next appendage of Soviet Empire is a question to which the Democratic Party in Congress now holds the answer. The President's position is clear, and Moscow has shoved its stack in. To the routinized liberal piety, "This conflict does not lend itself to a military solution," Moscow responded in 1985 with $350 million in tanks, armored vehicles and helicopter gunships. Daniel Ortega and Fidel Castro are going for "a military solution.
NEWS
February 12, 1991 | By Christopher Marquis, Inquirer Washington Bureau
With the Cold War over and regional turmoil dying down, the Bush administration appears to be moving Central America and the Caribbean to the back burner with startling speed. U.S. financial assistance to Central American and Caribbean countries for fiscal 1991 has been slashed by 40 percent over the last two years, according to State Department figures. In 1989, the Soviet bloc began to crumble. Soviet leaders have since moved to end years of competition with the United States in Latin America and elsewhere.
NEWS
January 21, 1989
Once it obsessed the Reagan White House, Nicaragua did. But when it came time to bid the nation farewell last week, Ronald Reagan didn't mention the place. That's standard in polite company these days. Nicaragua tends to start arguments. On no other foreign policy issue has America remained so closely and passionately divided. Nor for so long. It did come up - as well it should have - in the questioning of Secretary of State-designate James A. Baker this week. He is playing well in his pro forma confirmation hearings before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee.
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TRAVEL
September 12, 2016
Answer: Lake Nicaragua. Its area is nearly 3,200 square miles, and it's in southwestern Nicaragua, roughly 10 miles inland from the Pacific Ocean.  
TRAVEL
June 20, 2016
Answer: El Salvador. It's the smallest - but also the most densely populated - country in Central America. It also holds the dubious distinction of being the most violent country in the world, with a murder rate in 2015 of 115 per 100,000 people.  
SPORTS
June 4, 2016 | By Jonathan Tannenwald, STAFF WRITER
SANTA CLARA, Calif. - After all the hype, controversy and anticipation, the Copa América Centenario is finally here. But with just hours left until Friday's opening kickoff, one of the biggest questions about the tournament hasn't been answered. Just how big a deal is it, really? It's not the World Cup. It's not a traditional Copa América, the championship tournament for South American national teams. While that event usually has a few guest teams, this one has six from North and Central America and the Caribbean, and they're on equal footing.
NEWS
February 4, 2016 | Dom Giordano
THIS COLUMN is a limited tip of the hat to Congressman Brendan Boyle. Boyle represents Northeast Philadelphia and parts of Montgomery County. He was on my show last week voicing his opposition to bringing the "unaccompanied minors" to Northeast Philadelphia. These kids from Central America and Mexico were brought to our borders by coyotes or others and are in various spots in our country waiting for their legal status to be decided. Boyle confirmed to me that the Obama administration has briefed him on the fact that the Naval Support Activity complex in the city's Lawndale section would house those minors.
NEWS
January 11, 2016 | By Michael Matza, Staff Writer
A drive by federal agents to round up and deport Central Americans who entered the U.S. illegally after 2014 and have exhausted their asylum appeals is rattling immigrant communities nationwide. Representatives from Juntos, the Latino advocacy group with offices in South Philadelphia and Norristown, say they have been fielding "countless phone calls and Facebook messages" from people in "absolute fear" of the new effort by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement. "They can't keep going after these families who are coming here as refugees," Juntos executive director Erika Almiron said Friday.
NEWS
August 2, 2015 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
On Lansdowne Avenue, next to two benches and a bus stop, stands a new historical marker, blue with gold letters, 10 feet tall. "Looks nice," said Robyn Young, 61, the woman responsible, seeing it for the first time this week. "Taller than I thought it would be. " She pushed on the pole, kicked at the fresh dirt. "It's in there nice and firm. " Dedicated to archaeologist Tatiana Proskouriakoff, who "published a paper that revolutionized the world's understanding of Mayan hieroglyphs," the marker culminates years of effort by Young.
NEWS
October 10, 2014 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
"KILL THE Messenger" tells the story of newsman Gary Webb, who reported on links between CIA meddling in Central America and crack sales in California. Webb (richly portrayed by Jeremy Renner) was a journalist at the San Jose Mercury News , where, in the late 1990s, he was tipped to testimony from a protected government informant with information on CIA activity in Central America. Webb investigated, and found the agency's counterinsurgency activity in Nicaragua to have allies among groups who raised money via the drug trade (information previously uncovered by a Senate Intelligence Committee)
NEWS
July 26, 2014 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
His mother sells empanadas from their home in Honduras. He shines shoes - $5 a day. Add to their woes the constant threats: Join or be killed by deadly gangs. Now, gap-toothed Kevin, 14, is atop a speeding Mexican train called "the Beast," aiming to cross the U.S. border illegally, to face new uncertainties amid the "big towers" and "great cities" he sees on TV. Officials say tens of thousands of children like him are fleeing Central America, primarily Honduras, Guatemala, and El Salvador.
NEWS
July 22, 2014
THE SHINING SUN didn't produce much illumination as the New Sanctuary Movement and Juntos, both illegal-immigrant enablers, hijacked a protest in front of the Mexican Consulate at 11 a.m. Friday. By noon, Juntos and New Sanctuary (and the press) were gone, leaving several dozen members of the Independence Hall Tea Party to protest in front of the Bourse, where the consulate is located, above the food court filled with visitors from many lands. The visitors from many lands are here legally, I believe.
NEWS
July 17, 2014 | BY WILL BUNCH, Daily News Staff Writer bunchw@phillynews.com, 215-854-2957
THREE YEARS AGO, Jose Antonio Vargas was a 30-year-old with the kind of career that most young journalists only dream of - a share of a Pulitzer Prize with the Washington Post , a coveted byline in the New Yorker - when he decided to risk everything on the truth. The former Daily News intern confessed in a magazine article that he's been in the United States as an undocumented immigrant - brought here without papers from the Philippines at age 12 - and then announced he was leaving journalism to fight as an activist for the rights of some 12 million people who share his plight.
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