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Central America

NEWS
June 8, 1997 | By David Gonzales, FOR THE INQUIRER
Since I'm male, I feel a little ludicrous leaping atop a soapbox and pontificating about budget travel for women. But I find it infuriating when I relate one of my travel experiences - a bike tour on Washington's San Juan Islands, a jungle trek in Central America, or a solitary exploration of Croatia's Adriatic coast - to a female who says, "It's too bad women can't travel like that. " Wrong. Women do travel like that in every corner of the world. No matter how obscure or inhospitable my destination, I've always encountered women traveling alone or in pairs.
NEWS
May 18, 1987 | BY ROBERT C. MAYNARD
When obsessions become substitutes for policy, good intentions can yield disastrous consequences. This was true of our misadventure in Vietnam. What started as a policy of containment became an obsession with the desire to win. The result was not victory but disaster. For many reasons, it is dangerous to make glib comparisons between Southeast Asia and Central America. The regions are different, and so are the social and political realities with which we must deal. All the same, there is one way in which they are surely similar.
NEWS
July 1, 1986
The real scandal overlooked by Professor Arthur Schmidt of Temple University in "Contra aid: Bad money after bad" (Op-ed Page, June 25) is that the Democrat-controlled House of Representatives up until its change of heart June 25 steadfastly refused to approve appropriations in support of President Reagan's policy designed to combat totalitarianism in Central America. With the President's resounding re-election and the continued overwhelming vote of confidence shown by public-opinion polls, it should be clear that the great majority of American opinion has not been reflected by the majority of the members of the House.
NEWS
March 3, 1987
Norman Podhoretz' prescient Op-ed Page article telling us that Mario Cuomo would be the next president and send U.S. troops into Central America was pure balderdash. I've got news for him: We already have U.S. troops in Central America, lots of them. Thousands of troops (some regular, some National Guard) are stationed in Honduras; we have 12 air bases in Honduras, and our Navy cruises the area constantly. What we haven't done is invade Nicaragua, which, no doubt, he meant with the phrase "send American troops into Central America.
NEWS
March 24, 1988 | By Alfonso Chardy, Inquirer Washington Bureau
The Reagan administration in the next few days will give new powers to a special envoy to Central America, a move that could lead to a resumption of direct negotiations between the United States and Nicaragua, administration officials said yesterday. Morris Busby, who since May has served Assistant Secretary of State Elliott Abrams as a roving ambassador in Central America, will be named special envoy to the region, reporting directly to Secretary of State George P. Shultz, the officials said.
NEWS
March 9, 1986 | From Inquirer Wire Services
President Reagan said yesterday that Nicaraguan rebels needed U.S. military aid because "without power, diplomacy will be without leverage. " Reagan, one day after announcing his decision to send trouble-shooter Philip C. Habib to Central America as a special envoy, used his weekly radio address to press his campaign for $100 million in aid to the rebels, who are known as contras. The President's push has been getting a cool reception, particularly from the Democrats, in Congress.
NEWS
September 17, 1987 | By Chuck McDevitt, Special to The Inquirer
Armed with tents and camping gear and a banner declaring "PA Guard out of Central America," a group of peace demonstrators slept on the grounds of the National Guard Armory in Media last weekend to protest U.S. military involvement in Central America. Amid gray skies and sporadic rain, about 200 demonstrators rallied Saturday outside the 111th Infantry National Guard Armory at State and Church Streets to protest U.S. aid to the Nicaraguan contras and the Pennsylvania National Guard's presence in Central America.
NEWS
December 5, 1989
All right, the Malta summit did have one moment of, well, prickliness. It was over El Salvador, the little country where the guerrillas have been literally knocking on doors of the capital - despite more than $4 billion in U.S. aid to halt them. President Bush said that Moscow could be doing more to stop its hemispheric pals - Cuba and Nicaragua - from slipping weapons to the rebels. Notice the President didn't say the Soviets were still shipping arms to Central America. "They've told us they're not, and we believe them," Secretary of State James A. Baker 3d explained.
NEWS
June 11, 1987 | By JOHN M. BAER, Daily News Staff Writer
A group of Democratic state lawmakers wants the Casey administration to help keep Pennsylvania National Guardsmen out of Central America, and has introduced House and Senate resolutions to restore control of the National Guard to the states. The effort is part of a nationwide movement coordinated by the St. Louis Pledge of Resistance in Missouri, a group organized three years ago to protest U.S. military involvement in Central America. At issue is whether the states or the federal government decide how Guard units are used.
NEWS
July 17, 2014 | BY WILL BUNCH, Daily News Staff Writer bunchw@phillynews.com, 215-854-2957
THREE YEARS AGO, Jose Antonio Vargas was a 30-year-old with the kind of career that most young journalists only dream of - a share of a Pulitzer Prize with the Washington Post , a coveted byline in the New Yorker - when he decided to risk everything on the truth. The former Daily News intern confessed in a magazine article that he's been in the United States as an undocumented immigrant - brought here without papers from the Philippines at age 12 - and then announced he was leaving journalism to fight as an activist for the rights of some 12 million people who share his plight.
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