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Central America

NEWS
October 10, 1986 | BY JACK MCKINNEY
Even in the briefest of conversations, which is the way he prefers them, Duncan Murphy comes across as an essentially private man. But contradictory as this might seem, it would be literally correct to say that he is starving for attention! Murphy, 66, is one of four decorated war veterans who have been fasting on the steps of the Capitol building in Washington to draw wider public attention to the immorality of U.S. intervention in Central America. The fast is total. Their only sustenance is water.
NEWS
July 17, 2014 | BY WILL BUNCH, Daily News Staff Writer bunchw@phillynews.com, 215-854-2957
THREE YEARS AGO, Jose Antonio Vargas was a 30-year-old with the kind of career that most young journalists only dream of - a share of a Pulitzer Prize with the Washington Post , a coveted byline in the New Yorker - when he decided to risk everything on the truth. The former Daily News intern confessed in a magazine article that he's been in the United States as an undocumented immigrant - brought here without papers from the Philippines at age 12 - and then announced he was leaving journalism to fight as an activist for the rights of some 12 million people who share his plight.
NEWS
June 2, 1986
I am against U.S. policy in Central America, especially concerning Nicaragua. I don't think that the government is asking the right questions when forming foreign policy for Central America. As a Christian nation, the United States should be asking what is best for the people of Nicaragua. Americans should be concerned about their poverty, health and standard of living. We are instead worried about our best interests and an over-discussed East-West alignment. Washington is imposing impossible terms on all the countries in Central America, not allowing them to get aid from communist countries, nor giving them meaningful aid from our own huge wealth.
NEWS
July 15, 2014
THE PUSH and pull of Washington politics too often comes across as zero-sum nonsense, alienating Americans who want to care. That's how it must look to much of the country, and especially to residents of Texas, who are struggling with an immigration crisis of mounting proportions. It places into stark relief such silly ploys as Speaker John Boehner's vow to rally the House to pass legislation allowing it to sue President Obama to force him to "follow his oath of office and faithfully execute the laws of our country.
NEWS
June 8, 1997 | By David Gonzales, FOR THE INQUIRER
Since I'm male, I feel a little ludicrous leaping atop a soapbox and pontificating about budget travel for women. But I find it infuriating when I relate one of my travel experiences - a bike tour on Washington's San Juan Islands, a jungle trek in Central America, or a solitary exploration of Croatia's Adriatic coast - to a female who says, "It's too bad women can't travel like that. " Wrong. Women do travel like that in every corner of the world. No matter how obscure or inhospitable my destination, I've always encountered women traveling alone or in pairs.
NEWS
May 18, 1987 | BY ROBERT C. MAYNARD
When obsessions become substitutes for policy, good intentions can yield disastrous consequences. This was true of our misadventure in Vietnam. What started as a policy of containment became an obsession with the desire to win. The result was not victory but disaster. For many reasons, it is dangerous to make glib comparisons between Southeast Asia and Central America. The regions are different, and so are the social and political realities with which we must deal. All the same, there is one way in which they are surely similar.
NEWS
July 1, 1986
The real scandal overlooked by Professor Arthur Schmidt of Temple University in "Contra aid: Bad money after bad" (Op-ed Page, June 25) is that the Democrat-controlled House of Representatives up until its change of heart June 25 steadfastly refused to approve appropriations in support of President Reagan's policy designed to combat totalitarianism in Central America. With the President's resounding re-election and the continued overwhelming vote of confidence shown by public-opinion polls, it should be clear that the great majority of American opinion has not been reflected by the majority of the members of the House.
NEWS
March 3, 1987
Norman Podhoretz' prescient Op-ed Page article telling us that Mario Cuomo would be the next president and send U.S. troops into Central America was pure balderdash. I've got news for him: We already have U.S. troops in Central America, lots of them. Thousands of troops (some regular, some National Guard) are stationed in Honduras; we have 12 air bases in Honduras, and our Navy cruises the area constantly. What we haven't done is invade Nicaragua, which, no doubt, he meant with the phrase "send American troops into Central America.
NEWS
March 24, 1988 | By Alfonso Chardy, Inquirer Washington Bureau
The Reagan administration in the next few days will give new powers to a special envoy to Central America, a move that could lead to a resumption of direct negotiations between the United States and Nicaragua, administration officials said yesterday. Morris Busby, who since May has served Assistant Secretary of State Elliott Abrams as a roving ambassador in Central America, will be named special envoy to the region, reporting directly to Secretary of State George P. Shultz, the officials said.
NEWS
March 9, 1986 | From Inquirer Wire Services
President Reagan said yesterday that Nicaraguan rebels needed U.S. military aid because "without power, diplomacy will be without leverage. " Reagan, one day after announcing his decision to send trouble-shooter Philip C. Habib to Central America as a special envoy, used his weekly radio address to press his campaign for $100 million in aid to the rebels, who are known as contras. The President's push has been getting a cool reception, particularly from the Democrats, in Congress.
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